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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, June 11, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 11, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              WARM, HUMID TONIGHT, SUNDAY LA CROSSE HAS A SWIMMING POOL VOLUME 49, NO. 98 WINONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, JUNE 11, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES The F-80 "Shooting Star" jet-propelled airplane. JETS COMING TO DEDICATION Airport Crowds to See Flight of 'Shooting Stars' Fire At Joliet Burns Half-Block Area Jollot, 111. A fire which raged for six hours early today destroyed n half-block, three-story! brick building housing a hotel and] six business establishments in the! Jet-propelled aircraft, rarely seen by civilians, will be a feature of the gigantic air show here June 19. A flight of "Shooting will be here for the airport dedication from the 56th Fighter group at Selfridge Air Force base, Mich. downtown district. There were no! fatalities, I Fire Chief Arthur T. Dillon said! the blaze unused damage estimated nt The fire started about u. m. and was put under con- trol about n. m. Firemen from, Bust Jollot and Lockport aided In fighting the blaze. aomo 16 guests fled from the 50- HO-room Hotel Hobbs, whloh occupied the two top floors of the building at the southeast! corner of Ottawa and Clinton Mtrootii, Dillon salt! the fire wax believed to have developed In the basement of Davidson's cnfctci'ln and spread through the hotel. The Alsops Depression Felt Behind Iron Curtain lly Joseph AIsop although busi- no.s.M IH growing worse In this coun- try and Britain and the other Mar- shall plan countries arc running tutu new economic difficulties, there Is ivt least one consolation. Tim niKiw suggest that the Soviet The are in the 600 mile-an-hour class, will Wlnona's municipal airport several times, just above the runways. Their brief, but thrilling, per- formance will be just one feature of a four-hour military and civilian air show, including the world's finest flyers and aircraft. In ad- dition to the jets, the huge air- port dedication crowd will see: The U. S. Navy's superlative Blue Angels squadron from the Naval Air station at Corpus Christl, Texas. It is recognized as the world's outstanding exhibition team. A flight of Air Force F-82's, twin engine Mustangs, all- weath fighters, from Berf- strom Air Force base, Austin, Texas. A squadron of 12 F-51's from the 109th Aero squadron, Min- nesota Air National Guard, Holmnn Field, St. Paul. The Midwest Air show, which includes several of the out- standing civilian stunt fliers in the country. The dedication program that Sunday at 1 'buzz" Scott Plugging For Republican Congress in '50 Los tional Chairman Hugh Scott is busy mending the western fences, work- West Trying For Berlin Rail Strike Truce Russians Asked To Reopen Trade Talks By Thomas A. Reedy Western powers are making a new move to settle Berlin's three-week-old rail strike and clear the way for an east-west trade agreement, it was learned today. A series of proposals was draft- ed at a combined meeting of Amer- ican, British and French officials with members of the west Berlin city government and the striking union. The plan is to be placed before1 the executive board of the west1 Berlin board this afternoon. The City government then is expected! to submit the proposals to head-j quarters of the Soviet controlled1 railway system. Details of the plan are being kept, secret to avoid antagonizing any! of the factions concerned. The move toward a labor peace followed swiftly, on the decision of the Big Four conference in Paris instructing: the occupation com- mandants in Berlin to try and wind up their trade and transport talks by Monday, The Western economic chiefs ask- ed the Russians to reopen trade and transport talks over the week- end. They have not yet received any reply. The rail strikers suddenly called off their picketing last night at, the Russian-run headquarters. They said it became useless af- ter west German police first or- dered them from in front of the building and then told them to cut their ranks to 15 persons. Only some Russian officers a few eastern sector German police! entered the building this morning.1 Office work is being done in im- provised headquarters hastily set up in the Russian sector on Thurs- day. Truman Warns Europe Needs Full U. S. Aid Rescue Workers inspect the wreckage of a brick cafe-dance hall building at Belvidere, Neb., where three persons were killed as a tornado swept down this Southeast Nebraska town of 300 persons. The three dead and seven persons injured were in this building when the tornado Wirephoto) ing for 1950. a Republican congress in "The salvation of our Scott told a western states party conference last night, "demands an ;et along with itself. We can get Strike leaders said the Russians! Snyder Cites Factors Against Boom and Bust take Geneva, Secre- jtary of the Treasury Snyder said plan to set up complete tne fear Man Mentioned in Coplon Spy Trial Data Ends Life By The Associated Press A man mentioned in secret FJ3.I. papers read in the Judith Coplon espionage trial yesterday committed suicide by slashing his throat. Police said today they were positive the man took his own life. He died last Saturday during a canoe trip on the Potomac river. The suicide was Morton E. Kent, 48, Russian-born former State repetition of the boom-bust cycle ters In the Soviet zone. The strikers walked out on followed the first world war. I department aide. The F.B.I, papers lines May 21 demanding full pay- ment in west marks, job security and1 union recognition. No rail traf- adminis'tration which can at least talks by Minnesota Senators Hu- bert H. Humphrey and Edward J Thye. First District Congressman August H. Andresen and Lieuten- ant General Edwin W. Bawlings, Washington, D. C., air comptroller of the Air Force, who will re- cratjc Congress has a record that of the world Is economic. also suf- lumbago. particularly In the satellite aren In ICurupc. In fact this Is believed to have been the cause political crisis only a tew weeks ago. And from of a rather ucute In present the Air Force at the two- day celebration June 18-19. General Rawlings, a native Min- nesotan, will be the speaker at the dedication banquet at the Oaks next Saturday evening. But for speed, the Sunday after- noon performance of the jets will be tops. In the 600 mile-an-hour class, the "Shooting Star" weighs pounds and has a service ceiling of feet. With a one-man crew, this versatile aircraft has an operating radius of over 500 miles. Recently a flight of 15 F-80's left Selfridge for Furstenfeldbruck, Germany, making the over-Atlantic in easy stages: Bangor, Goose Bay, Labrador; Blulo West One, Greenland; vlk. Iceland; Kinloss, Scotland; Mansion, Englar Furstenbeldbruck. Carries Ten Wing Rockets The "Shooting Star" can carry two bombs and six 50- callber machine guns in the nose. It will also carry ten wing rockets. Normal dimensions of the F-80J 34 feet, six that kind of administration by since May 26. starting next year with the elec- tion of a Republican Congress." He .said that President Truman where strikers occupy'installations, also include brief cas demonstrated inability to get along with a Democrat Congress or a Republican Congress: "Every- one is out of step but Harry." He said that the SOth Congress showed that promises are made to be kept, but the 81st Demo- "an almost perfect string of goose-eggs." Scott contended the Truman ad- ministration hasn't delivered on its promises because "it doesn't want! Gen. Wainwrighl To Address DAV .Mankato, Minn. General Jona- than M. .Wainwright, hero of the Bataan death march, will speak at police. Another fantastic story made public in the Coplon case: told of a red spy ring which indulged in nudist sprees thrown for co-operat- ing Army and Navy officers. As a result of such parties, an told 500 members of Boy F.BJ. report indicated that Russian Scout councils In Illinois, Wisconsin, (secret police managed to obtain Indiana and Michigan. jdata at one time from two War de- It is normal, he said, to aides. 'He pronounced the country "ex- ceptionally strong both as to individuals and as .to business. "This places the economy in an unusually favorable position for a further Secretary Snyder minor declines in business even! when the general trend is upward, (j Auto Accident Fatal to Five In Wisconsin Oconto, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Fye, the parents of The P.B.I. reports have been mak- 18 were kiUed, along with Business close to continues to record levels operate even headlines like this, entirely un- the Minnesota Disabled American Veterans convention to Mankato June 17 and 18. Wainwright, national DAV presi- wants to keep intact Mr, Tru- man's collection of counterfeit are a inches 39 foot lengUi span, and 11 feet four bills in hope he can sell the same bills all over again to the voters next year and in 1852." The people, says the G.O.P. head, "bought some gilded promises last November, which turned a sickly green by January." He urged they "do not buy the same fake jewelry in 1950 or 1952." PhikoHead Dies During Address Philadelphia John Ballantyne 3oard chairman of Phllco Corpora- Jon, dropped dead Friday while de- ivering a commencement address at Meadowbrook school. Among the wife; ident, is expected to report on re- sults of a survey among DAV chapters to determine opinion of disabled veterans on national is- sues. The report, as released by Wain- wright yesterday, shows 63. per cent of World War n members be- lieve World War m can be averted, as against 66 per cent two years ago. HIP Kremlin's viewpoint, this isjlnches height, particularly grave, since Czech in- has boon relied upon. In all The 56th Fighter group that now flics this remarkable ship was j activated in June, 1941, and went Soviet economic planning, to con- tribute heavily toward meeting the Into combat from an Eighth Air Indvwtrlnl deficiencies in thu rest! Force base in England in April, of the Soviet sphere, 1 1942. It flew and destroyed IN UK IKK, AT the time of Iheimore than enemy airplanes. communist, coup d'etat at Prague, It was deactivated in September, the (Jwlw had the highest strui- 1945, but was reactivated at Sel darcl of llvlns in Europe; their in- fridge in May, 1946. Since March, du.Mti'lul potential had actually beenU947, the group has had jets. Increased by the German occu-l Pilots of the jets which will par- and they possessed large for- tlcipate in the Winona airport riedi' elKn exchange, reserves, both Inicatlon will be Captain Roland J. cash and credits. Slnco the and Lieutenant Patrick J. took ovct. however, Among World War I DAV menl- bers, however, 66 per cent believe another war can be averted as against 64 per cent three years ago. The needs of the disabled vet- eran, in his own opinion, are the same as three years ago, according to Wairiwright's report: employ- ment, compensation, proper reha- bilitation, hospitaliation and medi- cal care, and housing. the first study, 80 per forld War EC members lieved a disabled veteran could lead percentage cent be- three years of unprecedented output, he added. "The readjustment period which we are going through is not a sud- den development. It has been going on, in fact, since the very end of the war. as industry after industry has made its transition to a buyers' market. "It is a remarkable testimony to the good sense and caution of-the American people that the three record-breaking years of peacetime activity have resulted neither in over-extended credit, in excessive! speculation or in a dissipation of; personal or business assets. to the Coplon girl, ever Defense Attorney Archibald two of their sons last night when! their car was shoved into the of a truck. Palmer began reading them Tues- Two other children were Injured day after forcing the government prosecutors to produce them, des- pite protests disclosure might in- volve national security. But late yesterday Palmer sud- denly and unexpectedly announced that he would read no more of them. He said he figured he had proved hot as the the documents weren't as government had con- tended. He also indicated he might reach an agreement with the prose to to out critically. Killed instantly were' the par- ents, Edward, 60, his wife, 46, and Robert 14. Edwin, 15, died an hour and a half later at an Oconto hos- pital. Lloyd, 20, and Marion, 13, are in critical condition. All are of Abrams, The accident took place one mile west of Stiles Junction on highway 22 at last night. County Traffic Officer Gene Berken said typewriter used in of the .crash were sketchy hiif. 
                            

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