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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, April 30, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 30, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              THUNDERSTORMS SUNDAY FM RADIO AT ITS BEST VOLUME 49, NO. 63 WINONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 30, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES N. Y. Mother Kills Blind Child, Self New shadow fell over the life of Mrs. Alice Mc- Geough, 36, when her youngest child, Allen, was born blind. years later and the boy were found dead in a gas-filled cellar of their Queens home. Her arms still hugged his body. A note left for the oldest of her other four children, Jackie, IS, said: "Here's a dollar. Take care of the other children. You know I've been unhappy and sick. I'm taking the little fellow with me. I .can't .go .on. .Mom .always loved you kids, but try to un- derstand." Another note said: "I'm at the end of my rope. I know you will understand why I can't leave Duke." "Duke" was the family's pet name for the blind child. Mrs. McGreough's husband, John, said his wife had brooded ever since "Duke" was born blind. The husband was at work when the tragedy occurred. Chinese Reds Now 23 Miles From Hangchow By Tom Lambert col- umns today rolled to within 23 miles of Hangchow in an appar- ent move to knock out that anchor to the whole Nationalist position on the Shanghai front. the four powers, with the West The newspaper Sin Wan Pao satisfied at the pres- government employes in Hangchow jent position. The delegates of the Progress Cited In Talks to Lift Berlin Blockade Britain, France To be Taken Into Discussions By Francis W. Carpenter New and the Western powers appeared today to be advancing slowly toward an agreement on lifting the Berlin blockade. This was the view expressed cautiously in some Western circles as the result of a meeting late yesterday between United States Ambassador Philip C. Jessup and Soviet Deputy For- eign Minister Jakob A. Malik. Western delegates said it is not yet time to become too optimistic about a settlement of the ten-month stalemate. But after hearing Jessup's report on his two and one-half hour talk with Malik they obviously 'were en-j couraged. Also, one Western source said the West found ao "jokers" in the deal suggested by Russia. The situation now is roughly this: 1. Tass, Soviet news agency, re- ported '.iiat Malik had informed Jessup Russia would raise the blockade of Berlin if France, Brit- ain and the United States would lift their counter-blockade, and if they would agree on a date for a meeting of the four-power coun- cil of foreign ministers. 2: Malik later officially confirm- ed that Tass report, and Western sources said no other conditions have been raised by the Soviet.! 3. The talks are going all right! Thousands March In Loyalty Parade Red Guerrillas (black arrow, right) in surprise coup seized Putang, just across Whangpoo river from Shanghai. At the same time Na- tionalist sources announced abandonment of Soochow, guardian city of Shanghai, 50 miles to the west. Nationalist forces shifted to a point six miles nearer Shanghai. A red column to the west took Ihing and was believed pressing on toward Hangchow. Another com- munist force was applying pressure to Changshu, north of Shanghai, after crossing the Yangtze in three places. Blacked in area is ap- proximate extent of communist control. (A.P. Wirephoto Map.) had been ordered to leave and that locally-organized militia took over police duties. This might indicate the National- ist soldiers had withdrawn from Republican-Herald photo tne coastal city, 121 rail miles four powers here are reporting to their home governments. It is not yet clear where or when the next move will come. One influential Western delegate said the time has almost arrived for the Jessup-Malik conversations, r----- eniifhwptrf nf Shanghai ThAro was Ior me Jessup-MauK convers It -Weighs six pounds and measures 25 inches in length, and is the biggest fish reported for the open- nothing official to bear out this! neld twice this week at the Babich to Claim 'Mental Coercion' Milwaukee A claim of "mental coercion" will be used next Wednesday, a defense attorney said, in an attempt to save Milton Babich, 19, from going to trial on a first degree murder charge. Barkley, Cardinal Spellman Help With Celebration New York of marchers streamed down both sides of Manhattan and across Brooklyn today in Loyalty day and May day parades. There were two "American Loy- jalty day" down Fifth avenue and the other in Brooklyn. Trooping down Eighth avenue was the left wing "United Labor and People's May day" parade. Vice-President Alben W. Bark- ley, Secretary of Labor Maurice J. Tobin and Francis Cardinal Spellman joined in the "loyalty" de- monstrations, initiated in opposi- tion to the "May day" march. Veterans, religious and school or- ganizations participated in the two "loyalty" parades, consisting of some marchers. An estimat- ed marchers were in the "May day" trek. Although May 1 has been ths traditional date for the leftwing- groups to put on their show, they switched the date to today this year in order to vie with the "Loy- alty day." Governor Thomas E. Dewey gave official recognition to "Loyalty day" this year, after it was ori- ginated here in 1946 by the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Following suit, New Jersey and Los Angeles, Calif., also have planned. "Loyalty day" celebra- tions, but the events will not be observed until tomorrow. In Trenton, N. J., Governor Al- ired Driscoll yesterday proclaimed May 1 as "Loyalty saying: "It is particularly fitting in a day of false and devious propagan- da that we engage in voluntary expressions of individual liberty and obligations of citizenship." In Hollywood tomorrow, city of- ficials and gold star mothers will m ing day for Southeastern Minnesota. This beautiful brown was caught early today in East Beaver creek in Beaver State park near Caledonia by Dwight Coulson, pictured above, 223 West Broadway. It battled 'or more than 45 minutes before Coulson succeeded in landing it with the aid of his brother, Joseph, Houston, who put the net under the fish. Dwight was using a light fly rod and fishing with worms. The Alsops Backgroun Trout Fishermen Of Carrier Out En Masse, Big Decision Reported By "Lefty" Hymes By Joseph Alsop a.s ins on ecie ary o e-j was woncjerful morning for fishing and hundreds of fishermen Icnse Louis Johnson has been along tne many trout streams ot Southeastern Minnesota to- Ing the easy decisions so far. He'day to enjoy the perfect fairly good fishing. has shifted offices. He has Early morning fishing was generally good on the Whitewater and ished boards. He has put a burr'0ther. scattered. creeks of winona, Houston, FiUmore and Wabasha however. neia twice uus wees at the faoviet Delense counsel Arthur Richter said that "mental coercion." Jnuf' delegation building on Park Aven- _-. tn an statement from Babich about the OI nique said that one communist column had reached Teching, 23 road miles north of Hangchow. Earlier the garrison said Nation- alist troops had withdrawn from Wukang, 12 miles west of Teching, Sin Wan Pao reported artillery and Jean Chauvel, France. The first Jessup-Malik meeting took place February 15 in a United Nations-corridor. Then the' talks moved to the Soviet building. A four-power parley here would, in effect, be an advance meeting under the tal of the Joint chiPfs of Staff to hasten them in their task of evolving a unified strategic concept. And now he has stopped work on the Navy's giant carrier. It may seem odd to call this lastj decision easy, when it has caused! so much commotion. But a simple listing of the factors involved will show why the decision was simple; to the point of being unavoidable.: At any rate, it was inavoidable if counties' to a survev of and 'ust Wisconsin Fires Burn 8r084 Acres Of Forest Lands fire could be heard in Hangchow. the council of foreign ministers. The city was quiet and most shops [it also would lay the groundwork were closed. [and set a time-table for the coun- (The communist radio boastedjcil. that the main battle raged 70 miles' or so northwest of Hangchow, where it said seven government! armies were trapped and were being "annihilated." (This would mean more than 000 Nationalists, or nearly one-third of the total force assigned to defend ;he now-punctured Nanking-Shang- hai-Hangchow as little to indicate the were putting up much! resistance on the Hangchow front, although previously strong govern- Chicago The Truman ad- ment forces were reported moving ministration is "selling out" labor, to block the red advance.) to shooting of pretty Patricia Birmingham, girl he is accused of murdering. Wallace Charges Truman 'Sell Out' Of Labor Control The garrison communique said "Fishermen were satisfied with red troops in the vicinity of Kun- their catches and happy over thejshan, on the railway 35 miles west William Drazkowski, Winona Of Shanghai, had moved but little. county warden, stated on his re-i Nationalist troops were said to be turn from the Whitewater area I "vigilantly watching" them, shortly before noon. He.had beenj The U. S. liner Gordon will dock on the creek since I a. m. I in Shanghai Sunday to take on Henry Hanson, superintendent than evacuees. There the state hatchery at Lanesborojwill be 700 Chinese, 100 Americans reported that most fishermen in j and 200 other foreigners, that area had fish. There were a! The U. S. Navy withdrew the Richter said he believes if the statement is not admitted to evi- dence at the youth's preliminary hearing Wednesday, the state's first degree murder charge "will fall and the court will re- fuse to bind Babich over to mu- nicipal court for trial. The statement, released by Dis- Attorney William J. McCau- ley, quoted Babich as saying Pat? ricia was shot by accident Feb- ruary 10, when she picked .up a .22 calibre pistol which went off when Babich grabbed for it. He said he had produced the pistol to frighten Patricia so she wouldn't reveal that her sister, Kathleen, was pregnant. Babich and Kathleen eloped to. Michigan just two days before Pat- ricia's weighted body was pulled from the Milwaukee river March 20. The couple was located in Min- says Henry A. Wallace, March 22 and returned under the North Atlantic pact for questioning. the "cold war, the. military men) Richter asserted that during the want control of labor.' Wallace told a rally at the Chi- cago coliseum last night that "the reactionaries know that if the ad- ministration wants an armed pact and an arms economy, it must demand the right to control labor, the right to interfere with labor's rights." time Babich was in custody from Tuesday until he made his state- ment on Saturday, "he was not permitted to see anyone, includ- ing his lawyers. "The police wouldn't let him call Weckler Girl's Disappearance Still Mystery Fort Atkinson, Wis. Two years ago tomorrow a cute eight- year-old girl started down a lane toward her farm home near here. She never reached her home nor was she ever seen again. What happened to Georgia Jeanipeace. ovpr over speak- ers as part of a "loyalty" parade which will move over a two-mile route. Part of the theme of the New York "May day" march this year, sponsors announced, was a demand for "a peace pact with the Soviet Union instead of the Atlantic war alliance." Sponsors said the "May day" paraders, at the end of their trek at Union square in downtown Man- hattan, will take a pledge, includ- ing these words: "We declare our loyalty to our nation, to our people and to our great democratic institutions. "In the spirit and ideals of our jreat leaders we pledge to con- tinue the struggle for the complete destruction of fascist barbarism everywhere in the world, so that our people and all peoples can i prosper in a world of security and Weckler became, and still is, a na- Labor Secretary Tobin served as grand marshal of the Fifth avenue "loyalty" parade, while Cardinal tion-wide mystery. The family of the girl is resigned that Georgia is dead. "But we'd fee' a lot better if her body were dis- says her father, George Weckler. Seven thousand dollars in re- ward money still await the person who can. clear up the disappearance A convicted murderer now serving timp Truman unie J.IUIUB..I cal force was used on him, but there was mental coercion. Here was a boy kept away from his wife, U1CCA, JU31, UC1UW iiwtr uilliac j. j i j been painting of himself. [ported today that 521 forest fires 'hatchery, shortly before the open- chored at Woosung at the xnouthjis a direct and open interference lawyer and ques- Among the factors against destroyed acres in Wis-1ing hour at 4 a. m. That sector of the Yangtze. with the right of labor to run continually, first by one set carrier, cost was most obvious. The'ccnsjn tmc VPPT ----n" -4---1__' nwn ouicers ana men oy anotner. i price tag on tho carrier itself was between S150 and S200 million. The the creek, heavily stocked from No comparative figures were cited ithe .natchery, is slightly over aircraft to fly from it had not beenjbut the headquarters said this year's perfected, but were expected to cost I total was not much above average., At 0_ ramD a great many millions more. Then'if anv U wn the vast, expensive vessel, with its 7' than reported. to eibowjFormer Minneapolis Broker Succumbs Washington C. Hill, create a need for a very or unusually high, staggeringly expensive supporting! force of flak ships, smaller carriers! Generally good visability is enab-l to provide fighter protection, des-jling tower men to forest blazes troyer and other escort, etc. jmuch quicker than last year, the THE OVER-ALL investment in'headquarters said. i check is survival. (Continued on Page 12, Column 4) TROUT department': division, died yesterday of a heart attack. Burial will be in Arlington own affairs loyalty oaths, union financial statements, 'free speech' for employers which means free- dom to attack unions where do all these come from if not from the determination to interfere with la- bor's rights? "These are not compromises. ;torney In the plain words of labor, these are sell-outs. And the administra-. anybody on the telephone and they a life term in the Wisconsin state wouldn't call anybody for him. We prison at Waupun said he knew are not claiming that any physi-iwhat happened to Georgia Jean. Bu- ford Sennett told authorities he and an unnamed companion abducted the girl in their car. She died of an overdose of sleeping pills while they rnld her, said Sennett, so they j weighted her body and threw it into cemetery after funeral Tuesday. tion sells out labor because, under But McCauley discounted Rich- ter's claims, asserting, "There is no chance of the confession being thrown out. The treated. As far as not ask for counsel. He wasn't de nied his constitutional rights. He wasn't abused." The district attorney added that at a habeas corpus hearing March ,lthe Wisconsin river from the bridge at Blue River, Wis. Despite frequent and thorough the pact and the cold war, the 26, shortly before Babich made his services military ilabor." (Continued on Page ALSOPS Column 2) A. J. Rockne Returns Home A special warning that fishermen exercise care in the woods also was issued to coincide with the opening of the pan fishing season today in northern regions. There were 30 forest fires yester- j day which consumed 147 acres, the' Rochester, Minn. Former headquarters said. The loss by district for the yeai State Senator A. J. Rockne was back! at his Zumbrotn home today, fol-itlius far: lowing an operation at the Mayoj In district 3, with headquarters! Clinic to permit him to sit up. I tit Brule, 26 forest fires have burned! Rockne, 89 years old, suffered alBSl acres; district 2. Spooner, 77 broken hip some time ago and was [fires and 747 acres; district 3, Mer- brought to Rochester for treatment.leer. 26 fires and 11 acres; district 4, The operation was performed so helAntigo, 65 fires and 501 acres; dis- could sit up rather than being txict 5, Wsusaukee, 82 fires and 315 forced to lie down. Girl Flown to Mayo Clinic Recovering Rochester, Minn. Betty Ruth Milatn, 17-year-old Gadsden, Ala., girl, today was "recovering nicely" from amputation of her left leg by surgeons at the Mayo clinic. Miss Milam, a victim of a bone tu- mor, was 1'own to Rochester a week acres; district 6. Park Palls. 31 fires and 165 acres; district 7, Harvard. 61 fires and 635 acres; district 8, Rhinelander, 64 fires and 108 acres; district 9, Friendship, 59 fires and 4.729 acres, and district 10, Black River Falls. 30 fires and 138 acres, j Unusually light fire destruction! was noted for the Nicolet National forest which extends through seven northeastern counties. There have been only 18 fires and a total burn of only 25 acres so far this year! Forest protection headquarters said ago by an Air Force C-46. The low loss was due to above- ation was performed Thursday rainfall in the Nicolet doctors said her condition was good, [forest. men want control of statement, one of the youth's at- torneys, Edward T. Berkanovic, "publicly in the courtroom admit- ted that he deliberately permitted the police department to have cus- tody of Babich and to question him because he did not believe that Babich had any connection with the crime.' Berkanovic told the Associated Press that McCauley apparently iad misinterpreted his statements. He said he had stated that police dragging of the river area there, is I know he did'hlowever' no trace of the SWs body was found. Sennett is serving life for the shooting of Carl L. Carlson, a Uni- versity of Wisconsin medical stu- dent. Carlson's body was recovered; from the Wisconsin river at th same spot where Sennett later said Georgia's body could be found. The girl's father says he doesn' believe all of the convicted mur derer's story. Weckler says he be< lieves Sennett had something to do his daughter's vanishing, bu that he doubts the body was thrown into the river at the Blue river bridge. Georgia Jean was coining home from school on that May 1 day ,in 1S47. A neighbor had given her a ride to the lane entrance to her jnad the right to hold a suspect a home, Books to handj Georgia start- I reasonable length of time in a down the larle jof that nature, but he believed Bab- jich had been held "more than a reasonable length of time." Berkanovic said he had not been retained by the Babich family un- til about p.m. the night before he brought the habeas corpus ac- tion and had no earlier opportun- ity to try to free the youth. 'If I thought they were justified in holding him that he said, I wouldn't have brought the hab- eas corpus action." Richter earlier had said he would Spectators View wreckage in Manchester, Ga., after the engine of an Atlantic Coast Line freight crashed through a rain-weakened trestle on a mountainside. The engine, tender, and one car left the tracks and Engineer Guy Pressley, Fireman Frank Terry and Brakeman Johnny Hill, all from Man- chester, perished when they were buried in the wreckage. Manchester is in west Georgia near Warm Springs aad the Alabama V not object to introducing- Babich'Stake them t statement at the teal because it Austin Sewer Bonds Sold for 1 Vi Per Cent Austin. low interest rate of less than one and one-half per cent will be paid by the city on an bond issue for intercepting sewers which was sold Thursday night by the city council to Halsey Stuart Company of Chicago. Seven firms bid for the bonds. In :fered to one-half per and ic addition pay the city a Spellman acted as reviewing offi- cer. Numerous city officials also participated. Some school children were among the paraders in Brooklyn where Tobin and Mayor William O'Dwyer spoke. The Roman Catholic archdiocese of New York will hold a rally at the Polo grounds tomorrow In up- town Manhattan to pray for peace and protest injustices of "God-hat- ing Vice-President Barkley and the Right Rev. Msgr. Fulton J, Sheen, of Catholic university, Washington, D. C., are scheduled to address an expected persons at the rally. May I was declared an Interna- ;ional labor holiday by the Inter- national Socialist Congress in Paris n 1889, and has since been cele- jrated in many European coun- tries. Communists and leftwing groups in recent years have ob- served the day in this country. In Russia, it is an official holiday. Except for the parade in New York this year, few "May day" demonstrations are planned la tr. S. cities, a survey shows. In some states, such as Maryland, new anti- communist laws have put a dam- per on such celebrations. Narcotics Raids not kill Patricia But last night he said it is his opinion that the- state has no other evidence strong enough to bind the youth over and that without the in- troduction of the document, there premium brings the city's actual interest cost on the bonds to 1.4776 per cent. The bonds will mature serially, with due annually in the years 1951 through 1953; in the years 1954 through 1958: and probably would be no trial. 1S59 through. 1962. Net 17 Arrests per- sons, including two women, were ar- rested last night in narcotics raids. A. M. Bangs, Federal Narcotics bureau agent, said he hoped the arrests would reveal the source of ;upply of narcotics which have been distributed illegally. Police worked with federal agents in carrying out the raids. WEATHER LOCAL WEATHEK Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 83; minimum, 50; noon, 80; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at FEDEEAL FORECAST Winona and -Vicinity: Increasing- ly cloudy tonight with showers by early Sunday morning, low tonight 53; Sunday showers and thunder- storms followed by cooler. High Sunday .66. Additional weather on Page 12.   

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