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Winona Republican Herald: Friday, April 15, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 15, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              FAIR, WARMER SATURDAY VOLUME 49, NO. 50 FM RADIO AT ITS BEST WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 15, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES Russ Charge 'Hypocrisy' in Pact State Bonus Voted by House Senate Slated To Accept Bill In Main Form Maximum Payment Financed 'By New Taxes SoushtbyNWA The Northwest Airlines crash in which 37 persons were killed in Wisconsin four miles north of Winona last August 29, has become the focal point of a federal court suit in which the airline seeks damages totaling from the Glenn L. By Jack Mackay St. bonus for World War n veterans was virtually as sured today when a bill, passed! overwhelmingly by the house, wasj laid before the state senate. j Approved by the house, 127-2, thej measure provides: Maximum bonus of for 'vet- erans with domestic service. Maximum payment of to vet- erans with overseas duty. Payments of monthly for home service and for foreign December T. 1941 and ending September 2, 1945. Veterans with at least 30 days overseas service would be eligible to receive more than but not more than Taxes Proposed To finance the estimated cost of over r. ten-year period through sale of certificates of in- debtedness, the proposal calls for the following additional taxes: A flat payment by all persons, corporations and banks filing state income tax returns. (Applies to married persons with annual earnings and single persons with income.) A five par cent surcharge on all state income taxes. (For instance, a person whose tax is computed at would pay an additional 50 cents, or a total of Includ- ing the S5 flat payment.) Viroqua Feared to Have Escaped Police crash. The three-quarter million dollar eral district court in Cleveland, Ohio, by Northwest which claims the Martin company sold the airlines five defective Martin 2-0-2 planes- one of which plunged into the Wis- consin bluffs. In its petition for suit, the air- lines alleges 34 passengers and three crew members were killed near Winona when one of the airplanes a wing of flight" Northwest asks for the lost plane and its equipment, for the loss of services of four other planes and in workmen's compensations for which Northwest Airlines became liable. Not Suitable The planes Northwest claims, were not suitable for passenger ser- vice and were obtained from the Baltimore plant within a year be- Acheson Sees No Early End To Cold War Western Powers Take Lead Away From Russians By John M. Hightower Washing-ton Secretary of State Acheson evidently expects the cold war with Russia to last a long time. He gives the impression that the Western world has taken the ini- tiative away from Russia during the last year and a half, but that the end of the struggle is not yet in sight. The final outcome will take the form of a victory for the Western democracies provided they display "unending diligence" and "unend- ing courage no matter how difficult conditions may be." This estimate of the Western con- flict with Russia came from the 11 airplanes. {UI--i American secretary of state yes- i-jterday during a luncheon meeting delegates to the council of the i inter-American defense organiza- i.ltion. Acheson had first delivered a pre- pared address in which he dealt testified that examination 01 in general and farmUar terms with of the 24 2-0-2-type planes delivered the world situation. Later he spoke to Nortowest Airings revealed informally and without prior structure defects and that such a j Preparation in response to a toast testified that examination of five Joseph- Spiker Viroqna, armed car A ten per cent surtax on liquor d' safecracker remained at SS? levy ST3- large today and authorities feared on liquor; ten cents per barrel on he had slipped out of the state 3.2 beer 'and 20 cents per barrel on strong beer.) Extra one per cent occupation and royalty tax on iron ore. These levies would produce more revenue a year, ac- cording to Representative Law- rence F. Haeg of Robbinsdale, after yesterday's hairbreadth es- capes from the law. The fugitive was identified by his captured companion as "Mr -vninV ftR nf "Mi in IMP. inn. Ver-i Affiniaio rfince JEV. xiutf5 chairman of the bonus subcommit- said, tee. Estimate Yield With 80.000 persons and corpor- ations filing income tax returns, have been by faulty corrected in each plane. A spokesman for the Martin com- pany stated in Baltimore, Md., last night that his company had not yet received a copy of the pe- tition. He said he would make no The companion, who identified himself as Joseph Spiker, 18, also 000. lvies worthier calling for a constitutional ment to make it possible to put the revenue from the extra one per cent iron ore tax in the pro- posed "bonus compensation fund." The constitution provides that 50 from Western Wisconsin officers, Monick stole four cars and engaged in a gun battle with Deputy Sheriff Floyd Poter. Dr. Raymond Hirsch, owner of one of the stolen cars, was cut Riedel, Barris Go Past 726-Hour Flight Mark Thp constitution provides mat ou par cent must go into the general fo bullet-splintered glass, revenue fund; 40 per cent into the permanent trust fund and ten per cent to the iron range resources and rehabilitation fund. Representative Haeg said he ex- pects that veterans will get their bonus payments "for a Christmas present." He anticipated that first checks would be issued about next is if the senate agrees to the plan. Governor Youngdahl is expected to approve such a bill. Majority Leader Roy E. Dunn of Pelican Rapids said he was con- fident the senate would approve the house bill. Dunn told the legisla- tors he considered the vote on the! bonus question in the last general (Continued on Page 9. Column 2.) STATE BONUS Austin Taxi Strike Settlement Lagging taxi drivers' strike ended its first week today with no signs of immediate set- tlement, A I Miller, business agent of Local 867, United Auto Workers, CJCO said no meetings were plan- npd The situation, he' added, remained unchanged from the start! Riedel and Barris, however did last Friday. officially receive credit for a The disputes centers around thejnew record until they rut the 727- drivers' work week. Drivers now hour mark at p. m. P.S.T. Olivers __ __ -Rorric wax i portance to his words to the ex- Northwest Airlines representa-1 tent that they reflected the views hearing stated that the of America's foreign 2-0-2's were immediately withdrawn at the end of a particularly suc- from passenger service for Periods cessful period of Western diplom- In his brief talk he declared that "in the past 18 months the forces of liberty have gained the initia- tive." "We are approaching the he added, "when we can speak on equal terms with those who do not agree with only in a spirit of friendship but with equal strength. However, he made clear that he does not believe the newly won unity and the growing strength of the Western world mean that the Russians will quickly come to terms. "I should like to say our troubles are, in my opinion, only temporary and that they will shortly dis- Acheson declared. "But I cannot in honesty say this." He told the meeting that there are "two forces at work in the and added: "The outcome will be decided by our courage in meeting the exigen- cies before us, by unending dili- gence and attention to the danger before us. We need unending cour- age no matter how difficult con- ditions may be." Monick, 36, of Muncie, Ind. ver-jsuit were avaaabie to officials of non County Sheriff Morris Moon the firm. in! Glenn L. Martin, president of the (defendant company, said the suit was a "quarrel between insurance companies which does not affect us at all." The only way to settle the suit, he added, is through the courts. Martin contended that insurance companies representing Northwest Airlines seek to make his firm lia- ble for the crash while the Martin company's insurance firm is unwill- ing to pay for Northwest's mis- fortunes. In Washington, a CAB spokes- man said that a full report of the Winona crash hearing will be made shortly but that no information would be released until then. Riedel and Barris salute their wives. Fullerton, a new world's endurance record on their log. Dick Riedel and Bill Barris droned on today toward their goal of weeks aloft. They sailed past the 726-hour mark established in 1939 by Wes Carroll and Clyde Schlieper of Long Beach, Calif., and radioed to their home field here: "We feel wonderful and the en- gine's purring as smoothly as it did on take-off 30 days ago." Riedel and Barris, however, did refueling crew traveling in a second plane. r work a 72-hour week and at first asked for a 48-hour week but later modified this to 60 hours The four cab companies have agreed to a increase in the guarantee -to on condition the 72-hour tained. k week be re- Between 25 and 30 drivers are involved in the strike, many of them part-time drivers. Pickets have been stationed around the cab a 24-hour basis since tion of, a few hours from last night when a snowstorm started until 10 a.m., this morning. m. C.S.T.) yesterday. Barns was hours. The new record holders were con- gratulated by Carroll and Schlieper. the men whose mark they bettered. Carroll, now an American Airlines ip m USTJ yesreiaay. BOJ.I.U. woo at the controls of the little Aeronca captain, and Schlieper, an air opera- monoplane Sunkist Lady and swoop- tions concern hands ed low across the field to salute the crowd. "We'll see you in a couple of weeks or a the pilots told their wives over a loudspeaker on the field. Barris estimated the Sunkist Lady had traveled nearly miles since taking off from Fullerton at a, m. last March 15. On this, e-eon a strike started, with the excep- their fourth try at the record, Bar- _i_i_i. f, -naiir tilrirt ris and Riedel added a new twist to endurance flying by heading cross-country to Miami, with, their airport facilities for the city. Relief for Aged May Help World. Physician Says By Rene J. Cappon the aches and pains out of old age may re- lieve the world's chronic political ills at >tbe same tune, a noted Brit- ish scientist suggested today. Anyhow, said Dr. Vladimir Kor- enchevsky, this business of grow- ing old nowadays is a "disease" a normal physiological pro- cess. And it's largely unnecessary. But to return to prospects for making the globe a likely place to grow old, or even up in, here's how age ties in: "The world is generally run by older men. Because of their age they have the wisdom that comes with experience." But they also have the mental and physical weak- nesses that come with age, the Ox- ford university scientist explained. What to do? Get younger men ,auCr run the world? Well, they don'1 Their best previous mark was 568 have graybeards' infirmities, "bul at the same time they haven't got the experience that makes for wis- dom. So the eventual answer, Dr. Kor- enchevsky told a reporter, is to "get rid of the infirmities of olc from a jeep with the fliers as they passed the record. Two thousand spectators were at the airport. The Fullerton fliers refueled at Thermal Field, Indio, last night and stayed aloft over the desert away from coastal fog. The flight so far has cost It is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of this'ltttle city of whose businessmen chipped in for Republican-Herald photo Parishioners "of St. Thomas Pro-Cathedral had to pick their way through melting snow this morn- ing after attending Good Friday services. The surprise snowfall started Thursday afternoon and de- posited two inches here. By noon today, only a trace remained. Blue Skies Promise For Easter Parade f By Adolph Bremer Don't let this snow worry you, ladies, you'll be able to wear that new outfit in the "Easter Parade." The weatherman won't "Let it Snow" any more, and you won't needj a raincoat to protect you from, those "April Showers." There's nothing but "Blue Skies" ahead for the weekend. "I To Test U. S. Plant Defense Deny Claim Alliance Not Aggressive Release of U. S. Relief Worker in Czechoslovakia Asked By The Associated Press The first round of the East-West battle over the Atlantic pact wound up in the United Nations assembly last night with a final Russian charge of "hypocrisy." The accusation was voiced by Andrei A. Gromyko, Soviet deputy foreign minister, in reply to a state- ment by American Delegate Warren R. Austin that the alliance is not aggressive and that the United States does not want war with any- one. The Russian delegate declared Austin's speech concerning the de- fensive character of the pact was "thoroughly hypocritical and false." Gromyko charged that the truth about the purposes of the treaty would be found in speeches by American political leaders instead of by "pompous phrases about the struggle for peace and security." The communists still were hold- Ing up their end in the battle of words. The cominf orm bulletin in Bucha- rest declared today that reds all over the world will unite to "smash; the aggressors" in any future war. It said Russia, China, the "peo- ple's democracies" of eastern Eu- rope, the colonial peoples and -com- munists in every country would Join to win any war that might be un- leashed. The United States demanded to- day the early release of Vlasta Vraz, American relief worker held in a Czechoslovak prison for a week by Czech police. Miss Vraz told a consular official she is be- ing detained during an investiga- tion of "suspicion ol political ac- tivity." Westerners speculated today that the failing health of Bulgaria's communist Premier Georgi Dlmi- trov has taken a turn for the worse. The Sofia government said yester- day Dimitrpv had gone to Rus- sia for medical treatment. The Greek government reported today that fighting has broken out again all over Greece. It claimed 107 rebels recently were killed and 114 captured. It placed government losses at 18 slain and 56 wounded. Pope Pius XH in a Good Friday encyclical from Vatican City asked that an international regime be instituted for Jerusalem and its surroundings. The plea was sent to all Catholic bishops in the world. says the weatherman. The snow that covered much of Minnesota and Wisconsin and other areas overnight win be short-lived. Above-freezing weather today was melting it away, and tomorrow tem- peratures up to 48 degrees will wipe away the remainder of this unwel- come snow. Tonight the mercury will dip down to just below before the advent of milder weather. The weatherman sees mild weather way into next week. Setback for Spring By that time it may really be good. Yesterday spring suffered a real setback. Yesterday morning the "heat" or something set a tree afire at the Westfield golf course; yesterday afternoon a true blizzard had sheathed the same tree in snow and ice. Winds up to 40 miles an hour first drove -rain, then sleet and finally snow. The Minnesota high- way department had its plows out this morning; the Winona street department, on a Good Friday, holi- Co-op Manager Confesses Fake Burglary day, care decided to let the sun of the snow removal. take When the blizzard was over this morning, the Winona observer dip- ped in his official stick and said that the snow measured two'inches. He-melted it down and said he had .13 of an inch of water. Snowfall General Much of the Midwest was talking in terms of snow today, however. There was heavy snow in a belt 50 to 100 miles wide Jrom northern Iowa into central Wisconsin and Southeastern Minnesota. Snow .was reported from Iowa and northwest- Albert Rein- from By Elton C. Fay series of war games starting next month will testj Air Force bomber and fighter fleets' the vulnerability of vital Am- erican industry to enemy attack. Strategists have calculated that the initial blow by an enemy would be directed at slugging into paraly- sis the great war munitions cities such as Detroit, Pittsburgh, New York, Chicago, Boston and Balti- more. Thus, the code name for the war games has ominous if not in- tended significance. "Operation Actually, the code name is taken A.M.A. Opposition To Truman Health Plan Protested Washington A committee backing President Truman's health' insurance program contended to- day that comprehensive voluntary insurance plans are blocked by "or- ganized medicine's monopoly con- artz said today the manager of the Mower Co-operative Service Com- pany in Waltham village has con- fessed he stole and merchan- dise from his own. firm and staged a fake burglaryto cover the theft. Reinartz identified the manager as Glenn Shawback, 30, and said Shawback had signed a statement admitting the theft. Waltham is in Mower county 14 miles northeast of Austin. County Attorney-Wallace C. Sieh said he would file a charge of sec- ond degree' grand larceny against Shawback Saturday. Mower county tne game. Air Force officials said today that details on the numbers and types of planes to be used in the test by the Strategic Air Command and the Air Defense Command, definite dates, etc., are still to be worked out. Also important in the games will be the radar warning network and radar aircraft control nets from which intercepting fighter forces will be directed to defense of the target cities by the attacking bomb- 's. While plans up to now refer only to B-29 and B-50 type bombers, some officials thought it probable county societies "are B-36's be court was closed today because of the' Good Friday holiday. .Shawback reported on February 27 that his company had been burg- larized. Mower county authorities and the state crime bureau have been conducting an investigation. Reinartz said Shawback confessed he took a bag containing in cash from the safe In the company office. The dial of the safe was -and have wisdom unfettered I em Missouri to northern lower knocked off and a window kicked in ag_ for a better world." How to achieve this? The Russian-born gerontologist (meaning scientist studying the pro- cesses of aging) has been doing research since 1907. And he notes that science still doesn't know standards of normal aging and normal old age. Besides, "gerontological research can't al- ter in a few months, or even years, Michigan. More than seven inches of snow fell in Mason City, Iowa. There was light snow as far south as St. Louis and some was forecast for Chicago. Rain fell over parts of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois as the storm moved through the southern wnose ciupjjeu m J.WA LCJ. the expenses.. Purpose of the flight what hereditary development has is to point up the need for better fixed in a million years" with re- spect to man's aging. to make it look like a burglary, the confession stated. Shawback also related in his con- fession, Reinartz said, that he took Great Lakes region. The strong from the firm, northerly winds to the west of the storm center carried cold air from central Canada southward to the northern plains Mississippi valley, and the Upper 'Operation blackjack" is the first of a program of annual air-war games planned for this and the next jfour years. 65 La Crosse Truckers Strike La Crosse, Sixty-five drivers for 12 local trucking firms left their jobs today following a breakdown of negotiations for wage three automobile about worth w the theft following the detector test. increases. However, ten drivers returned to work when four of the companies haHpriPs and siet the demands, batteries ana Arnold, representing lo- ot spark plugs a trols." The committee on the Nation's Health, headed by Dr. Charming- Frothingham, past president of the Massachusetts State Medical soci- ety, sent a report on- the subject to Mr. Truman. Senator Murray (D-Mont.) said the administration health cluding a compulsory insurance will be introduc- ed within ten days. The report submitted by the Frothingham, group said "monop- American state and depriving' American families of better and more comprehensive medical in- surance plans at reasonable costs." The American associa- tion is an outspoken critic of com- pulsory health insurance, calling It socialized medicine. Senators opposed to President Truman's proposals already have jumped the gun on the administra- tion by offering legislation of their own to expand medical and hos- pital services. A bill introduced yesterday by Senators Taft H. Alex- ander Smith and Donnell (R-Mo.) provides for federal ex- penditures of over in the next five years to aid states in developing health programs. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity Clearing to- night with, hard freeze: low 28 in the city, 25 in.rural areas; diminish- ing winds. Fair with rising temper- ature Saturday; 'high 48. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 Shawback was given a lie detector ApriM. when the union's test in Minneapolis Thursday. The sheriff .said the manager admitted contract expired. He did not disclose the union wage demands lor the settlement reached with the four companies. 38; j 'minimum, 23; noon, precipitation, .13 (2 'inches of sun sets sun rises tomorrow at Additional weather on Page 3.   

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