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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 12, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              COOLER LATE WEDNESDAY SUPPORT VOLUME 49, NO. 47 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 12, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES ounci Treaty Hailed As Peace Step Truman Asks Quick Approval By U.S.Senate Hoax Hinted in West Coast Kidnap Story Within U.N., Constitution, President Says 'Y Set to Open Building Bids June I- Goal Short With the campaign for funds approximately short of the required amount, final plans and specifications for Winona's new Y. M. C. A. were approved here Monday at an all-day meeting. At the session were the "Y" building committee, the "Y" general secretary and the archi- tects. It is now anticipated that the printed plans and specifications will be available for bidders on or before April 30 and that bids Washington I.'IV- President Tru- man sent the North Atlantic de- fense treaty to the Senate today with a request for its approval as "one step on the road to peace." In a message. Mr. Truman said the treaty deals with the "realities! of the situation we face today." He also said it is set up "withtaj the terms of the United Nations] charter and the Constitution of the United "This treaty is only one although a long the road] to peace." the President declared.; "No single action, no matter howl significant, will achieve peace. We must continue to work patiently prac-, tical, realistic steps in the light jescuT little Kathy Fiscus. will be received and opened by the "Y" board of directors June 1. The architect and the build- ing bureau of the "Y" are hope- ful, said "Y" Building Commit- tee Chairman J. A. Henderson, that the stabilizing influence of firm material prices will result in competitive lump sum pro- posals, which will permit con- struction of at least the basic building plan. "However, the budget esti- mate, on which the fund cam- paign is based, was reviewed, and we are confident that all the funds are required to build the basic plan despite the de- cline in construction prices." The basic plan does not in- clude the construction of the dormitory section. Present at the meeting yes- terday were Mr. Henderson, Willard Hillyer and John H. Glenn, members of the building committee; Secretary H. O. Johnson; Bertram A. Weber, Chicago, the architect, and Wil- son Connell, Jr., of the national Y. M. C. A. building bureau. Hero Awards Asked MS For Kathy's Diggers must continue to work patiently San Marino, is opening her pocketbook today to fil a Pjjanf piTA and carefully, advancing with prac-'ard tne heroes who lost their race with death m their attempt f JJUIII I II V tical, realistic steps in the light ]rescue little Kathy Fiscus. I of circumstances and events as] The Los Angeies Chamber of Commerce reports that money is com- they occur, building the .nfromall parts of the country for the 50 to 60 men who toiled under of peace soundly and solidly." hazardous conditions long be- The treaty was signed here by! 12 nations on Monday of last wcek.j It pledges aid each other] in event that one of them is at-] tacked by an aggressor. To become binding on the United States, the treaty must receive the Senate's ratification. That means approval by a two-thirds vote. Administration leaders are con- fident that the Senate will even- tually ratify it, but a long debate is expected once the treaty reaches the Senate floor. The first step at the capitol will be for the Senate foreign relations committee to hold hearings. The Lie Prepares U.N. Peace Force Defense By Max Harrelson New al Trygve Lie was reported ready most hazardous conditions long be- yond the normal exhaustion point. The chamber has formed an over- all committee to consolidate the collections. The American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars are sponsoring fund drives. Willmar, Minn. Damage was placed at House Ready To Approve ECA Grant Final Vote Seen During Afternoon, Program Unchanged By Douglas B. Cornell House lined up the new European recovery pro- gram for swift passage today after a battle over how much it should cost. Approval looked like a cinch af- ter the way a team of Democrats and Republicans methodically smashed all but one attempt to change the program yesterday. Speaker Rayburn (D-Texas) pre- dicted the same lineup would mow down efforts to trim the total, hold- ing it "as is" at plus a guarantee to private investors. The Senate approved a European recovery bill by a 70 to 7 vote last Friday, after which swept a bulk in the oil plant at i Kandiyohi to peril that entire vtt i nQw shaping up the House. These 1 differences must be ironed out by Child Reports Abductors Were Kind to Him Beverly Hills, ing of a five-year-old youngster for 000 was reported today to po- lice, but Chief C. H. Anderson branded it an attempt by the father to "get publicity." Friends of City Engineer Rally; Meeting Called Informal Vote Shows 6 Against Reappointment The "Friends of Frank" commit- tee today called a public meeting in support of City Engineer Carl W. lage last night before firemen from a joint Senate-House committee i five communities quelled flames. Leo Treese, manager for the the I before I gram. final passage of the pro- juuoiuiub in..-- keo Treese, manager lor me President Earle V. Grover of the Kandiyohi Farmers Elevator Com- hamber said one of the commit- jDany said three storage tanks con- tee's first jobs is to consider rec-jtaining, more than gallons of ommending the engineers and ojl and Otner petroleum pro- Rayburn and Priest gave forecasts to a reporter arranging for the House to hogs for Carnegie hero medals. were destroyed with loss of He explained the purpose of the! about fund is not to pay the men for] xhe Litchfield Produce Company the long, hazardous hours they do-i estimated a loss in destruc- nated, but rather to give them fi-jtion of its buying station here, nancial- recognition. The fund ad- cim-immipri dress is: The Rescue Fund Com- their after hour "earlier than usual for the showdown. Rayburn said it might all be over in "a couple of hours or so." He said he expected plenty of attempts to slice the bill but "not much __________ .trouble" batting them back. Kandiyohi firemen summoned aid some members'who want to keep from Willmar, Paynesville, helping Europe think the aid the backers and critics of the treaty Congrcss-to express of their views. Throughout Mr. Truman's appeal Tor Senate approval of the pact ran the theme that neither the Uni- ted States nor any other nation can "achieve peace independently." committee to hold hearings. The al Trygve Lie was reported reaay aress is: me x- irum "i" Tn t0day fiBht taCk V the backers and critics o. the treatyIM_t Ma fnr an oil tanks and dousing roofjtive Lawrence Smith (R-Wis.) and fires in the village caused by flyingj Representative Preston embers.' jwho offered economy amendments Willmar police were also sum-] poes of the entire program made moned to miles east no ciaims they could block pas- i_ sage gut they said they did have I blast man force to guard U. N. peace missions over the world. The heat was taken off the husky Norwegian N. N. chief temporar- ily, however, when the delegates of the general assembly shifted this morning from committee Meantime, H. E. (Whitey) Blick- ensderfer, "a foreman" of the res- cue effort, expressed the feelings of his gangs when he said: "I'm no hero. It was just a mat- ter of simple humanity." of aid in controlling thou- sands drawn to the scene by the W efforts to bar detailed U. N. de-iher chest. bate on the communist prosecution j Dr. Hanson said the jack-knifed park, New York. Russia was expected to renew of Hungary men in Bulgaria. tviio mornincr Irom committee H Success to a ser- sibfe'To insure that of plenary meetings at Flush- tained in the knowledge that "We cannot escape the great possibility that goes with our great stature in the world." It was for this reason, he con- tinued, that the American people accepted the United Nations char- ter in 1945 and have sought since to make it "a more effective in- strument." He cited, too. the European Re- covery program as a move "im- Aether'' they could vote directly portant to the prosperity and peace] on bid for U. N. mem- of our country and the world." i His message went on: "The North Atlantic treaty is fur ther evidence of our determination to work for a peaceful world. "It is in accord with the action of the Senate last June when it i saiius uiawn LU me Dr. Paul Hanson, family column of smoke which cian. said three and one-half year-jwas Vjsibie for many miles, old Kathy might have lived through! the 53 hours of rescue work if her knees had not been jammed against e on e communs r r. anson Josef Cardinal Mindszenty in the 14-inch casing pre- gary and 15 Protestant clergy-'vented her from breathing except Iwith great difficulty, A preliminary little autopsy report blamed suffocation There appeared to be chance the Russians would succeed in side-tracking this debate. Some delegates also hoped the assembly would be able to decide for her death. Dr. Hanson and Dr. Robert Me Cullock said the child probably died painlessly and likely within an hour and a half after she fell 90 feet on israei s DIU iur v. jnt0 the abandoned well at bership without sending the appli- Friday afternoon. They said n yn-trYiT-rtltfoO riP-l____ n frtno TVCIQ! Woman Says 'Urge To Kill' Caused Her to Choke Child elderly neigh- bor woman four-year-old Bobby "a. chance" of putting across a cut. The House bill would authorize the Economic Co-operation admin- istration to spend be- tween now- and June 30 and he wants a lot of publicity to sat- isfy gambling debts." The boy, blond Joey Goodman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Goodman, was released unharmed after his mother said she paid over the 000. In his hand was an envelope containing _ Anderson said he considered that Goodman, "by the hop- 'ed to convince his creditors that he couldn't meet their demands be- cause he had been forced to pay out a large sum of money.' "If this were a case of kidnap- the chief declared, "there would be no money returned." The chief identified Goodman, 40, as a "known and said he is an ex-prizefighter from Nor- folk, Va. The chief said he had quizzed Goodman for several hours and "he hedged on every point of the story." Anderson said he believed Good- man's wife, Mary, a sunset boule- vard dress shop owner, had acted by the new Wlnona city council. It will be held Friday at 8 p. m. in the community room of the city building, Chairman M. L. Cieminsld said. At a caucus session behind closed doors last night the council in- formally voted six to two to oust Mr. Frank as city engineer. One new councilman did not vote. Firing would be accomplished by refusal to reappoint him for an- other year. His present term ex- pires May 2, and he has applied for re-appointment. Only the two fourth ward alder- James Stoltman and Joey Goodman YarO. dress ouup UWHC.L, in good faith when she obtained the I Pfeiffer, both holdovers, and First from her bank account and Warder William Holden and Second Indiana Banker Wounded, Three Gunmen Escape New .Castle, Hinshaw, 51-year-old bank presi- enineer for one.year term. The new Alderman-at-Large Joseph Krier withheld his vote last night. Voting for firing were the council president William P. Theurer and his fellow alderman from the third ward, Howard Baumann, both "old" on the council; Second Warder Jos- eph. Dettle and First Warder Loyde a safety deposit box yesterday without her husband's knowledge. The boy is a military academy student. The chief said the boy reported he had seen his abductor in the Goodman home "with papa one night. But he was wearing dark j glasses today (during the kidnap- Anderson said the report of the incident runs like this: On Sunday night, a man phoned the Goodman home and said: "This is the Page Military Acad emy. We will be unable to pick up Warder Henry V. Parks, both newly- elected. The vote is not final; it was taken at the caucus of the new council. one of three gunmen late last night after he answered a knock on his door at his home. Hinshaw, president of the Citi- zens State bank of nearby Shirley, was taken to the Henry county hos- one will be over Have him ready at a.m. The parents sent the boy on out in the morning, when the car ap- peared and honked. At 11 a.m., the phone rang again and the man said: pital. His condition was reported 'fair." Indiana state police and Henry _____ auu uuuv. county authorities, who joined in in the following year. search jor the gunmen, said they tier provision is intended toiwere unable to find a motive fnfl de private businessmen to shooting invest up to in Euro- Kinsbavl-s wife, Urpha, 45, re- "we wau, pean recovery projects, with t d hearin tbe callers ask her !f. Jat Meeus ernment guarantees as an induce- band u his naroe was Hinshaw. throat Iment. she said she heard him answer in two hours thejubway ternun 'We have your baby and we want money." Then to answer Mrs. Goodman's :he gunmen, saiainey boy was put on the to find a motive to talk. The man followed: 'We don't want you to cry out 'Heat's' On This would require no taxpayers' money unless the government had to make good on some guarantees, such as against loss through con- fiscation. cation to a committee for more de- bate. was conscious when a rope waskhoked the chUd to deatht m .her Soviet attack on Lie, guard fflK 7. signified its approval of our coun- try's associating itself in peacetime with countries outside the western hemisphere in collective arrange- ments, within the framework of the United Nations charter, designed to safeguard peace and security." This reference was to the so- called Vandenberg resolution in which the Senate went on record as favoring a regional security ar- rangement along the lines of the Atlantic treaty. That resolution was introduced by Senator Vandenberg "Without referring directly to the me -j v" ;iit; uciiotu iu committee number two at Lake her legs iusz Katzsuchy clwged ttie Lie a body and both legs to- proposal violates the U. N. charter., to do t.h. Maschmeier's UUillllll ULCt w.w ji.iliiL IIUI cess. Both Soviet Delegate Jakob her chest. A n "Dnlicli .Till- 'became 7 statement last necdine weubcu, D tu i-jiHno- nctpf-i I night admitting the killing, Detec-j live Lieutenant David E. Kerr said.j A-MaTik and Polish Delegate rope was entwined iiisz Katzsuchv charged the hnth as y. ;_. Forrestal Terribly and then a single shot was fired. Hinshaw collapsed on the door- step. The three men fled to a big black 1949 sedan parked at the curb and drove away. Witnesses said the car carried Nevada license plates. A nephew, J. R. Hinshaw of New i !5Hc IlttU. UcciJ. uwn-u Malik went farther and describ-1 shouti above. But her ed the plan as a scheme to bypass position prevent the security council and give the d behid the Maschmeier's see Mrs. Masch. tne security uuumju lifted United States and Britain a chance Autopsy surgeons also suggested for military and political interfer- t tng child may have died from ence in the affairs of other count- ht ries. A. H. Feller, director of the U. N. legal division, retorted in the committee that Lie had initiated the idea for the guard force "with- Washington James For- restal, hospitalized former secretary I of defense, "is terribly exhausted Imeier yesterday afternoon, she said in the statement. When the woman's husband, Hen-Jin every way, his son said rv F Maschmeier, a plumber, Navy physicians said yesterday came home from work about 6 p. The parents, Mr. and Mrs. David m he {ound Bobby lying On the H. Fiscus, said in a statement that I room floor_ thousands of messages of condo- Coroner Sarnuei R. Gerber ruled Soviet Union, the the people of the _ community" have seen "solemn agreements" broken, the rights of small nations destroyed and the people of small nations "deprived of freedom by terror and oppres- sion." "They are Mr. Tru- man said, "that their nations shall not, one by one, suffer the same late." At another point, the President said "the 12 nations which have signed this treaty, undertake to ex- ercise their right of collective or1 individual s e i f-defense against armed attack, in accordance with article 51 of the United Nations charter, and subject to such meas- ures as the security council may take to maintain and restore in- ternational peace and security. He added: "The treaty makes clear the de- termination of the people of the United States and of our neighbors in the North Atlantic community to do their utmost to maintain peace with justice and to take such action as they may deem neces- sary if the peace is broken." 30 Years Given On Rape Count Faribault Earl Gulbranson was sentenced in district court yes- terday to seven to 30 years in the state reformatory. He had pleaded guilty to a charge of rape. al building. We will know you." Mrs. Goodman went to the bank, got and went to the ter- minal. There she said a dark, cur- ly-haired man approached her, took! the money and told her to wait in a telephone booth for word of the child. Five minutes later, a man phon- said his uncle never and said: been in Nevada and had no known "come to the back of the Am- enemies. "We haven't any reason to suspect anyone. We can't imag- could have done he I to the (Conned on PaKc 12, Beared HERO AWARDS the act of a deranged per- officials." _ _ that the 57-year-old official, who retired at the end of last month, is suffering from "occupational tjoroner samuei -n.. ueruei IIUGUIfatigue, wmcn is direct y lences have been received. The par- death was caused Dy strangulation, suit of excessive work_ during the war and postwar years." His son Michael, 21, said his fa- ther must have plenty of rest. "He hasn't been eating properly because he was too he said. Forestal has been in the naval medical center at nearby Bethesda, Md., for 11 days. He was flown there from Florida, where he had gone for a vacation after giving up his government post. A bulletin issued by the hospital yesterday said Forrestal showed symptoms "characteristically seen in states of exhaustion" and added: "The only psychiatric symptoms present are those associated with a state of excessive fatigue." Representative Rankin (D.-Miss.) told the House that Radio Com- mentator Drew Pearson on his ABC broadcast Sunday night made a "vicious attack" on Forrestal. Ran- kin did not say what Pearson said, but the congressman announced he was going to ask the Federal Com- munications commission to "prevent such inhuman abuses" in the future. Albert Lea Prohibits Grocery Beer Sales Albert City council last night adopted an ordinance prohibiting the sale of beer in gro- cery stores. The council doubled the fee for "udozer Which Besan work immediately after her lifeless body was removed, puts the finding The fee, touches to filling in the well in San Marino, Calif., where three-and-one-half-year-old Kathy Fiscus died. The Jaw became effective imzne- AU vestiges of the death trap have been obliterated. lately upon passage. ine who said. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Generally fair but with some cloudiness to- night and Wednesday. A little warmer tonight; low 44. Turning cooler late Wednesday; high 64. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today 69; precipitation, The "heat" was on City Engi- neer Carl W. Frank today fol- lowing a caucus of the new city council last night. It was voted, 6 to 2, to oust Mr. Frank who has been engineer here since May, 1945. noon, bassador hotel and get your boy." She said she did and found the boy there. Joey said: "They were real nice to me. They gave me a yo yo and milk." Twin Girls, Father Killed in Home Fire Eau Claire, baby girls and their father died today in a fire that destroyed their home about ten miles west of here. They were La Moine MacLaugh- lin and his daughters, Trudelle and m none; sun sets Judith, 17 months Mrs Mac- tonight at sun rises at 5T2g tne nouse wnn Additional weather on Page 12. I daughter, Helm. Flames Poor Forth a heavy column of black smoke as over gallons of oil burn Monday in a fire which swept the bulk storage plant at Kandiyohi, Minn., operated by the Farmers Elevator Com- pany. Neighboring towns sent firemen to help fight the blaze. The loss was estimated at (AP. Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald.) Technically, Aldermen Prondzinski, Parks, Holden and Krier are not in office until day for their first session. However, since new councils are faced with a variety of appointments at their first meeting, it is custom- ary for them to meet informally prior to that formal organization meeting to decide important issues. Re-appointments of all city offi- cials with the exception of the city engineer, were agreed to last night. President Theurer is slated for re- election, come Monday night, as president, and Alderman Dettle, oldest councilman in point of ser- vice as vice-president to succeed Ben Deeren, retired first ward alderman. The "Friends of Frank" commit- tee was formed at a meeting of 14 persons at the Winona Athletic club last night. Public Invited Chairman Cieminski said that all aldermen will be invited specifically to this meeting, as well as the gen- eral public. Said he "We're going to have some peopie there who will get up and say why we believe Mr. Frame should continue as city engineer. We want those aldermen there, so that they can get up and say pub- licly why they don't want him as sort of a "town meet- ing1." The city engineer, in office since May 14, 1945, has been under fire at intervals during the past two years, particularly from the Asso- ciation of Commerce. That criticism reached its height during 1946-47, when the engineer presented plans for extension of the city's sanitary sewer system. Before advertising, the associa- tion insisted, the council should have the plans reviewed. After long wrangling, the council agreed to submit to the association pressure. Late in 1947, the consultant en- gineer made a report, declared Mr. Frank's plans were "consistent with, good engineering practice." How- ever, the consultant indicated that the expanded drawn by Mr. serve a city twice (Continued on Page 12, Column 2.) CABL FRANK.   

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