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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: March 30, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 30, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              RAIN TONIGHT, ENDING THURSDAY SUPPORT YOUR Y. M. C. A. VOLUME 49, NO. 36 WINONA, EVENING, MARCH 30, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES rrest Powers Denied Inspectors Search Continues For Babied Gun Search for the .22 caliber revolver which Milton Babich said he had flung into the Milwaukee river after Patricia Birmingham's weighted body continued today. A diver, Walter Richter, prob- ed the muddy river bottom yes- terday off the dead end street on the waterfront but was un- able to locate the weapon. Police said diving operations would re- sume today if weather condi- tions permitted. Hundreds of curious lined the area despite a chill wind yes- terday, watching two boats dragging magnets. Police called five motorcycle officers to help handle the throng which they sale! hampered their work. Babich, 19-year-old admitted slayer of his bride's 16-year-old sister, was scheduled to be driv- en again today along the route which he said he took February 10 after Patricia had been kill- ed at suburban West Allis. Babich, in a confession last week, said he was afraid Patri- cia would inform their parents that Kathleen, her 17-year-old sister, was pregnant. He added that he had bought a gun to scare Patricia. But he said she laughed and made wise- cracks when he protested her flippancy about her sister's pregnancy. The statement said he showed Patricia the gun, she picked it up by the barrel, he grabbed it and it discharged. His defense counsel, Arthur Richter, said yesterday he would make no further attempt to ob- tain bail for the youth, who will have his next court appearance April 12 at a hearing on first degree murder charge. s' Crime Bewilders Milwaukee seemed to be no reason why Milton Babich should become anything but a model citizen. Certainly, he was a model boy. But something went wrong and that is why Milwaukee is so bewil- dered by it all. Milton Babich, at 19, faces life in prison, if convicted of the first 15-Month Rent Control Bill Goes to Truman Federal Crackdown On 'Black Market' Operations Forecast By Francis M. Le May Washing-ton Capitol Hill icard predictions today that the new rent control extender will set! ff a government crackdown on a I rent "black market." President Truman was expected to sign, in plenty of time, the "home! rule" legislation that continues rent controls for another 15 months. Just two days before the present controls are set to die at midnight Thursday, Congress late yesterday tossed the new compromise bill to I the White House by overwhelming! votes. Then: 1. Representative Patman (D-Tex- as) said it will mean a "rollback Babson Predicts Mild Recession Winter Haven, Pla. Economist Roger Babson pre- dicts a minor recession from now until 1953, and offers this advice to business men: Prepare for competition, buy on a hand-to-mouth basis, keep expenses down, keep out of debt, and store cash. Babson told a civic club yes- terday that the recession will be less severe than the one in the early thirties because there are too many subsidy pensions, government mort- gages, high bank deposits and rental ceiling's, The Alsops Acheson Faces First Big Test By Joseph and Stewart Alsop G, Acheson is; about to meet his first test as sec- retary of state representing this country on the very highest level of International negotiation. Ernest' Bsvin and Robert Schuman are of- ficially coming to Washington for the formal unveil- on her way February 10. accidental. But, says McCauley, Milton ad- mits he bought a .22 caliber re- colver two weeks before the shoot- ing, intending to frighten pretty Patricia so she would quit making (Continued on Page 16, Column 3.) MODEL BOY Gas Tax Increase Bill in Wisconsin Arouses Opposition _____________ Madison, bill to in- ted States agreed at London over crease the state gasoline tax from 12 months ago to create a cents a gallon to five ran into German government, and to merge opposition yesterday. ing of the Atlantic But while the British and ?Fr e n c h foreign m i n 1 s t e rs are here, Acheson, will also try to get agreement on the German prob lem. This will be his first test, and, it must be added, none could be more difficult. During the last year, while no- bociy worried and everybody squab- bled, the Gorman problem has been allowed to become shockingly acute. Britain, Prance and the Uni- degree murder charged. with which he is year old The state of Wisconsin says that this good-looking, well-mannered, quiet youth killed 16 Patricia Birmingham. It charges that he did so be- cause Patricia was flippant about her sister's sister, Kathleen, 17, with whom Milton had been keeping company, and with whom he eloped two days before Patricia's bullet pierced weighted body was found in the Milwaukee river. Hard to Believe Many people still find It hard to believe, despite Milton's state- ment to District Attorney William J. McCauley, that he shot Patricia home from school Milton said it was of illegal as well as in- creased rents on some properties where landlords are not now show- Lag a. profit. He said it will put an end to the rent "blackmarket" that Tighe Woods, rent administra- tor, reported to be growing through- out the country. Tornado Lashes North Central Oklahoma Towns By The Associated Press A tornado struck communities in north central Oklahoma early to- day, killing at least two persons, injuring several others and causing heavy damage. The twister first hit Canton, a community of about 75 miles northwest of Oklahoma City. The Senate Heads Fight Move to Cut ECA Fund Defeat for Taft Proposal Seen by Senator Connally By Jack Bell foreign policy leaders of both parties stood pat today against a move by Sen- ators Taft (R-Ohio) and Russell (D- Ga.) to whack about ten. per cent off the European re- covery program. But Senator George (D-Ga.) threw his powerful weight behind the Taft-Russell proposal with the as- sertion that unless some cut Is made this country may face "a ser- ious financial deficit." Senator Connally who heads the Senate foreign relations committee, predicted defeat for the Taft-Russell proposal. But the Tex- an admitted the vote might be close. The committee's top Republican, Senator Vandenberg (Mich.) would not comment publicly. But he was reported to have told colleagues he tornado moved northeastward andjis sticking by the full authorization" 2, House Democratic Leader Me- struck Longdale, a town of aboutj Vandenberg has taken the stand Cormack (Mass.) said in his and ripped through the south I that the Economic Cooperation ad- ion there won't be any big increases! part of Blackwell, a city of ministration should have elbow in rent for anyone, and most rents! Two bodies were found in the probably won't be increased at all. 'ruins of Canton and Longdale, and 3. Paul V. Betters, executive di- 1 the total known injured in all three rector of the U. S. Conference of (communities is 12. Mayors, predicted no major city I The first tornado smashed into room to defend before the approp- Britain's Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin, left, smiles and waves from the rail of the liner Queen Mary in New York harbor as he arrives today on his way to Washington, D. C., for the signing of the Atlantic security pact. Standing alongside him is Hector McNeil, Britain's minister of state. CA.P. Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald.) General Bissell Faces Court-Martial Probe Frankfurt, of an unspecified nature have jeen preferred against Major General Clayton L. Bissell, headquarters of the U. S. Air Force in Europe announced today. The announcement said the charges are being investigated to deter- mine whether they warrant a trial by court-martial. amount it says it needs. If the authorization In the pend- ing- bill is cut, ECA would have was military and air attache at the embassy in London will drop rent controls under thejCanton, a town of at stay under that ceiling in its bid May- 1946- to 1948- Air rule" provisions of the m. without warning and went actual funds to carry out its pro-'Force offlcials declined to say what the charges were. Officials would not even say -what! rule" provisions of the m. without warning and went that allows states or localities to (right through the home and busi- ,hrow off the controls. (Governor Thomas E. Dewey of New 5Tork ias said he will not approve res- dential rent decontrol in that state without "clearest proof that con- rols are neither necessary nor de- Mr. Truman was described byjulation and injured five. ness sections. Moments later it crashed into lit- tle Longdale, located seven miles northeast of here with 400 people. Less than three hours later an- other twister of lighter force struck the south side of Blackwell, pop- riends who talked to him as "ela- Continued on Page 14, Column 2.) RENT BILL Britain Pushes Oil Sales in Dollar Market New step up her sale of oil in dollar markets. At the same time she is being given American which to purchase oil. "This town looks like it had been gram. Meanwhile, Senator Malone (R- Nev.) charged that Marshall plan (article of war Bissell is accused of! countries helped by the United (violating. States are actually using that aid to "rearm Russia for the third world war." "The recipient nations are ship- ping everything from locomotives to jet engines to Russia and Russian ground in a said the first (satellite Malone said In state patrolman who reached Can- ton. "It's ripped to bits." A low pressure area which cen- tered near the stricken section moved northeastward. Thunder- storms were reported throughout Oklahoma, southeast Kansas, Mis- a speech prepared for delivery as the Senate resumed debate on the authorization bill, "Those supplies are produced with the. raw material and money furnished by the United a Bissell arrived in Germany yester- day. During the Investigation he Is being represented by a special counsel, John K. Hughes, an at- torney from Chicago and Wash- ington. The investigation of the charges against him is being made by Ma- jor General Edwin B. Lyon, the Ah- Force announced. -n.ai.woo, wniie we are severely souri and Texas. Rain was forecast! restricting our own exports to the for most of the north central states: iron curtain countries." by tonight. I Malone proposed an amendment More snow fell to the central j to restrict ECA aid to private busi- Rockies, western plains and some] ness loans in Marshall plan coun- north central states today. There tries repayable in ten years. He was six inches of snow on the said the loans would be granted ground at North Platte, Nebr., three! on the same basis as Reconstruc- inches at Denver and Cheyenne, ition Finance Corporation loans are The Air Force announced Washington last August 14 that i nymous letters charging Bissell in hone? rn Wyo-' and two inches at Pueblo, j given to firms in this country. rhe snow belt covered Col- George told a reporter he is ba< eastern their zones of German occupation. with wltn George told a reporter he is back _. western) jnjr the proposed ten per cent cut Nebraska, southern] because he thinks prices are level- i South Dakota, southwestern ing off and a dollar of American look as sota and northwestern Iowa. will buy more materials to if she could scarcely lose on a deal area aroundjship to Kurope next fall than was ui _ e j 011 a. aeai {reeziDg ]owest reading again estimated when the ECA budget t was at Butte, Mont, where! was made up last November. like that, although the sum she Is getting to buy oil is too small to ._._.._.. mean much in her larger campaign mercury to six degrees Senator Lucas of niicois, the to sell oil. But it does open Up mar.ra.tic: Ipadpr. oiroosfid the entire foreign oil policy of the! Om'ted States to the puzzlement of! i 11 Some American oilmen are Dill 10 MOnOf Representatives of the petroleum Since then, however, nothing has industry, taxpayers groups and re- been done to carry out the and vacation interests attack- agreement. or to find some other way to liquidate the increasingly pernicious system of direct mili- tary government of Germany. WITHIN GERMANY, the political effects of this Allied aimlessness are already grave. They will shortly become disastrous if the dissension continues. Acheson has got to achieve some sort of practical so- lution. Yet he has almost all the ed the assembly highway commit- tee's bill. Several opponents suggested the .hat they find the international oil situation both confusing and dis-! 'couraging. j They note the following this week and wonder: 1. 'Britain must increase its earn- ings by increasing of oil to dollar says Sir Frederick legislature should try to get more Bairii president of the Federation of for its money out of present high-British Industries. others quoted I 2. The Economic Cooperation ad- ._ jvjinjstratjon tjjis approved an allocation to Britain of to buy crude oil and petroleum. highway department officials as saying a year ago that the state had ample money for highways and that the big problem was lack of material and personnel. Only proponents of the bill, which (Continued on Page 14, Column 4.) proposes to collect annual- 3. is reported to be ne- gotiating to purchase all its foreign Fairbanks for Work In CARE Program "unauthorized transactions" had led to an Investigation. G.O.P. Leans To Isolation, Lucas Charges Washington Lucas (D- Hl.) said today that G.O.P. attacks on United States foreign policy mark a return to "the Isolation ism that has lost Republicans elec tions before." The Democratic leader told a re porter he thinks the voters will de feat senators who have leveled criticism at the European recovery The statement said the accusa- (Program and the North Atlantic tions made in the unsigned letters'treaty scheduled to be signed here were not proved by a preliminary I April 4. investigation. mocratic leader, opposed the contending that the full amount is] needed. He said in an interview! that Republican, attacks on the Mar-i shall plan and the North Atlantic' alliance "come from the same kind! j of isolationism that has lost Re- i publicans elections before." raft and Russell proposed a ten per cent cut in cash outlays, but left intact a contract authorization. If their amendment were adopted, the over-all total of retary Symington had ordered further inquiry. Bissell at one time commanded the T7. S. Air Force in India and then was brought back to the United States to tecome assistant.chief of the Air Force staff for intelligence. Father Conneally Succumbs at 70 Doug Fair- be knighted by the king of England. Douglas Fairbanks Jr. was noti- fied yesterday that he had been! made an honorary knight command-) the bill would be (President spend what's left of the funds voted for nationalist last year. The amount in- Liquor Control Bill Killed by Committee, 8-5 Dernek Joins Senate Majority In Rejecting Plan St. senate liquor control committee today killed by an 8-5 vote a bill to give state liquor control inspectors the power of ar- rest. The measure was a key part of Governor Youngdahl's law enforce- ment program for this session- of the legislature. As finally acted upon, the bill was a watered-down version of a pro- josal introduced by Senator Harry Wahlsfcrand of Willmar. It would have limited inspectors' powers of arrest to certain types of liquor law violations. An exchange between Dudley C. iricson, state liquor control com- missioner, and Senator Helmer Myre of Albert Lea spiced the discussion eading to the vote. Myrc, a former sheriff, said the tate sheriffs association opposes he bill and added that his exper- ence as sheriff was that the liquor inspectors are "not very reliable." "My men are honorable said Ericson, "I resent any sugges- tion that they are not reliable. They have done a good job but they need the power to mate arrests to do a better job." Ericson declared sheriffs all over the state ask for help from his de- partment but want the inspectors kept to the status of "mere inform- ers without authority." Voting to kill the bill were Sena- tors Walter Burdick of Rochester. Sam Dennlson of South St. Paul, Leonard Dernek of Winona, William Dietz of Montgomery, Myre, Her- bert Rogers of Duluth, George Siegel of St. Paul and Julius Spokely of Crookston. Spokely, like Myre, Is former sheriff. Against the motion were Raymond Julkowskl of Minneapolis, B. G. Novak of St. Paul, Wahlstrand and Colvln Butler of Fergus Palls, chairman of the committee. The house liquor control commit- tee, meeting separately, tabled the power-of-arrest by a 12-6 vote. Some legislators considered thli bill "dead" for the session. Syrian Army Commander Seizes Rule Damascus, Syria Brigadier losay El 2aim, commander of the Syrian army, took over the Santa Monies, Dormell and Watkins have de- has taken Monselgneur Nicholas nouncedjthe pact and demanded the Conneally, inspiration for Leo Me- Carey's academy award picture "Going My Way." The kindly, humorous Irish priest right to question witnesses. Taft has indicated support of the treaty but died yesterday at the age of 70. He had served the Roman Cath- olic church for 42 years was pastor of St. Monica's church, moved yesterday to cut recovery funds 10 per cent. Senator Wherry of Nebraska, the Republican floor leader, retorted "'that Lucas was "just talking pol- 'itics Most Excellent Order] He said the amendment was of- nsfivo ong purcase a s oregn e sa e amenmen was o- petroleum requirements from Bri- j ff ibsh for _his work f ergd 3t direction o{ the because a senator wants to ALSOPS City Manager Plan Refused V St. Louis Park, yesterday turned down a city man- ager form of government. The vote was ag-ainst and for. The new charter would have tain. ly to build new bridges, were As- i furnished semblyman Romel (.R-Adamsl, Formerly D. S. oil Anglo-American relations and for hed most of Argentina's for.jms chairmanship of C. A. R. E. j relations committee and a constant visitor at his B commlt the gtate department! And the Priest's many anecdotes involve doesn't mean he's an iso- r in member of the Highway committee, I 4. For the fourth time this year ithe 39-year-old actor shortly after and State Highway Commissioner I Texas in April will cut the amount was notif'ed of the award, prob James R. Law. of oil that can be produced. The boosted council membership from bridges that are too weak or nor- "Our present horse and buggy United States has been producing era bridges can't take than it consumes loads and Law told thej j. The U. S. government has just committee. Fifteen bridges have resumed licensing shipments of collapsed in the last 15 years, ex- steel pipe to the Middle East. It elusive of flood washouts, he add- will be used to bring huge quanti- fies of Arabian oil to the Mediter- ranean coast. There the Arabian oil will be ed. Law testified that was needed to replace more than 200 five to seven besides provided for'row. a city manager. Fred Elliott, of the Wisconsin ably unprecedented to any Amer- ican in the acting profession. He said he was "taken completely by surprise" by the joint notification from the British consulate here and in Washington. "It's a tremendously fine declared Doug. "I am only representing the feelings of the av- erage American in the work I have Only a little more than a third I Petroleum Industries committee, jher planned sale of oil in dollar of the registered voters went .toj0PPosed the increase, contending [markets. In the meantime, she that available highway funds are (might use her ECA dollars for buy- available in time either for shipment! Deen doing." to the United States or to Europe.] He plans to go to Buckingham England might use some of it forlpalace to receive the knighthood in the polls yesterday. A similar proposal 1940. lost out in British Scientist To Confer on ECA Aboard the Queen Henry Tizard, the British govern- ment's top scientist, said today he Will confer in Washington next "more than ample." He cited fig- ures and surveys to show that Wis- consin will receive in highway funds from 1949 to 1953. This includes unused federal funds due to the state and anticipated collections at the current rate. of increased ing oil in the western hemisphere and selling to such, ail-scarce'1 na- tions as Argentina. American oilmen formal ceremony in late spring or early summer. Besides his C. A. R. E. post, Fairbanks is vice-president of the United Nations association in this country. He has been prominent in various civilian diplomatic mis- construction Americans right out of the world "And in the fact revenues, highway costs are going he added. I trade picture. Joseph Handles, of Vilas county! said, "We should reduce the' gas! tax, if anything, because the mon- some have said so loudly-whether sions, starting with duty as "if n in our zeal to rebuild European In- fnr scientists in a conference on what this cyclotron dustries we may not be fattening up a few that in time will push Wednesday with Paul Hoffman, we're collecting now isn't doing ECA head, on using Marshall plan funds to improve British industrial productivity, Tizard is chairman of Britain's committee on industrial productiv- ity. He also heads the Labor gov- ernment's advisory council on scientific policy and its defense, research and policy committee. the job." James Burk, of Marshfleld, who identified himself as "an average gruy and a little said the state needs more control over the money it hands out. "If we had that we wouldn't have this patchwork of roads in he argued. Nazi Button Too Much for Bull Hamburg, valu- able prize East Friesian bull, ser- iously ill, recovered after on oper- ation. A veterinarian removed a nazi party button from its stomacn. envoy for the late President Roos- evelt. During the early years of the war he served with Lord Mount- batten's Commandos; and later dut- ies as commander in U, S. Navy destroyer forces brought him many honors. Medals he has already re- ceived; The British Gallantry Award, French Legion of Honor and Croix De Guerre with palms, the Italian Cross of Valor, and the American Silver Star and Legion of Merit. Now knighthood, which has come to only a handful of Americans, General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Winthrop Aldrich; among j ward China. Meanwhile, a first-year birthday party was scheduled for the Mar- shall plan for next Wednesday, with Vice-President Barkley heading a list of British and American speakers. about his work in the parish and St. Monica's school gave the dir- ector the idea it would make a wonderful story. It did, winning "Going My Way" seven academy awards in 1944. Mc- Carey himself won two, for the best director and the best original story J Third Life Force Sought By Howard W. Blakeslee, Associated Press Science Editor Rochester, N. third great force in the universe Is the goal of the new cosmic ray cy- clotron dedicated last night at the University ot Rochester. value of -can do for mankind. The other two forces are gravitation and elec- tro-magnetism. All the power, chemistry and med- icine known in the world up to now Is based, on these two forces only. The third force, which' the new cyclotron Is revealing, is something mysterious and far more powerful than the other two. It is the force which packs tightly together the heavy particles which form the nuclei, or cores, of atoms. This is the force which, lets go to make atomic bombs when atoms split. It is the force which in the splitting process produces Hie heat for atomic power. It is the force which makes the new iso- topes, or radioactive atoms, that half the medical and scientific world is now getting Jrom Oak Ridge, Term. "The country is behind the bi- jpartisan foreign policy as it is be. carried on by President Tru- man and Senator Vandenberg (R- Lucas said. "These attacks on the pact and on the European recovery program come from the same kind of isola- tionism that has lost Republicans elections Lucas singled out Senators Don- nell Watkins (R-Utah) of Taft (R-Ohio) as among those has President predicted will be defeated the nextj9uwath and hls entire cabinet and time they face the voters. Donnell ls.ln compete control of the city, and Taft are up next year Master James Hugh Watkins in 1952 Keeley, Jr., said the army accom- plished an early morning coup d'etat. He said the army described Its assumption- of power as a tem- porary measure toward achieving a truly democratic regime. Military leaders accused the present rulers of Syria of despot- ism. They were quoted as saying- that they were not themselves seek- ing power but were acting only to achieve a true democratic re- gime. Last December there was rioting hi Syria. It expressed popular re- sentment over the government's handling of the Palestine war with Israel. As a result of the riots, Premier Jamil Mardam Bey ?nd his cabinet resigned and Mardam Bey fled the country. A successor cabinet was formed under Premier Khaled Bey Azem. Seven Apartments Damaged in Fire Janesvllle, building containing seven one-room apart- ments was badly damaged by fire yesterday after all the occupants had departed for work. The blaze had spread from a first floor apart- ment to the attic before it was discovered by a passer-by. Fire Chief Prank Murphy said the blaze might have been caused by a cigarette spark. aheroposed security treaty, Wherry told a reporter. it will work and what it will lationlst. "There are a lot of people who think the way to prepare against the next war is to put our money in building up our defenses here and not into building up land ar- mies in Europe that couldn't stop the Russians if they attacked." Fragments of this new force are appearing In the electron-volt beams which the new cyclotron produces. The fragments are somehow part of or closely connected to energy, meaning the energy of your body as well as of anything else, your entire body is known to be made up of only three kinds of particles two heavy kinds, known as protons and neutrons, and light weight electrons. Until now these three particles have been ap- parently unchanging. The Rochester cyclotron is producing protons which change themselves into neutrons, and then back Into protons. What this may mean to human bodies is unknown. But it is important to science, because this is a new source of a different kind of neutrons. Why this is important scientifically may be clearer if you remember that neutrons are the particles which split the atoms that make bombs and atomic power and that manufacture hundreds of the new kinds of radioactive atoms. Other particles called mesons, which arc weak cosmic rays, also are made by this cyclotron. But the mesons are only a small fraction of things which the cyclotron produces. All appear connect- ed with, the third force. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and nt rain tonight, diminishing Thursday. No important tempera- ture change. Low tonight 36; high Thursday 45. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 48; minimum, 36; noon, 37; precipitation, .34; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at Additional weather on. Page 16.   

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