Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: March 7, 1949 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 7, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              VOLUME 49, NO. 16 WINONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 7, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES om Beats Storm Over Pacific Wearing His Globe-Circling "lucky suit" and a new Homberg hat. dapper Bill Odora waved a cheery salute to well-wishers at John Rodgers airport in Honolulu last night before sitting down at the controls at his single-engined Beechcraft for attempted non- stop flight from Hawaii to New Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) West, Puzzling Over Red Shift, Rushes Defenses By John M. Hightower i Washington (flV- Western governments still puzzling over the Moscow foreign ministry shakeup are acting speedily to bolster their "frontier" against communism. The main conviction in Washington, London and Paris is summed up by diplomats this way: Whether Moscow's diplomacy toward the West gets tougher, softer or continues unchanged the primary respon- liblllty of the western powers now is to be prepared to meet any con- Bill to Shield Intelligence Agents Drawn Measure Goes Before Hpuse in Secret Debate By Howard Dobson Washington A carefully guarded bill to shield U.S. intel- ligence agents and give them some new powers abroad went before the House today in almost complete se- crecy. House leaders said it had to be that way. They arranged for strict limits on debate, with no oppor- tunity to amend the bill on the floor and little time to inquire into its details. Chairman Vinson (D-Ga.) of the House armed services committee said no details will be explained to Congress. The committee held brief secret hearings on the meas- ure, but kept no stenographic rec- ord of them. The bill was cleared last Friday by the House rules committee after Representative Short (R-Mo.) as- sured it "the subject matter is highly secret and deals with our national security." TJ. S. Nerve Center It would give the central intel- ligence agency permanent statu- tory authority the things it does now under executive orders and emergency powers of the President. The agency, highly secret nerve center for the cation's intelligence operations around the world, would be allowed to hide its annual bud- get in the budgets of other gov- ernment departments, as it does now. It also would be excused from publishing its payrolls and ex- penditures, as other departments are required to do. Then the agency, with the ap- Hawaii-New Jersey Air Record Sought San Francisco A brisk tail wind speeded Distance Flier BUI Odom toward the California coast today on his record-seeking, light plane flight from Honolulu to New Jersey. He said be was ahead ol i schedule and past the worst ol a Pacific storm. His latest report showed him well past the half-way mark on long ocean hop. It was estimated that he was less than (statute) miles from San Francisco, already having flown more than miles without the slightest hitch. Odom made a a. m. (C.S.T.) report to the airways communica- A Car Plows through Missouri river flood waters covering the highway near Winthrop, Mo. Emer- gency striped markers outlined edges of the pavement.-CA.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Longer Credit Payments Made Effective Today Washington V V w Left Homeless By Floods in Iowa Army Secretary Royall Expected To Quit Cabinet By The Associated Press One man was dead and two university students were missing today as floods inundated or threatened hundreds of homes In western Iowa You can go and Nebraska. By Ernest B. Vaccaro Key West, Fla. Presidential! confidants disclosed today that Sec- retary of the Army Kenneth C. Royall is the next high ranking administration official to go. These reputable 'but unquotable- by-name officials said Royall wtil 'step out within ten to 20 days.. His [successor has not yet been decided iupon, they reported. Meanwhile, the President settled down to the enjoyment of a fort- night's vacation at this naval sub- marine his sixth trip to Flor- ida. He flew in yesterday, lading at the Boca Chica and a half miles irom here. He will fly to Orlando tomorrow tions service. An escorting B-17 turned back to Hawaii at the mark after reporting Odom was at feet and finding the weather much bet- ter than it was in his last attempt to set a new small plane distance record. He was forced down In that attempt on January 13 at Oakland by bad weather over Cal- ifornia's mountains after flying new record in Itself. Odom planned to ride the beam of Radio Station KGO in San Fran- cisco to the West coast. Another military plane from the coast was scheduled to pick him up about miles from San Francisco. The balding, 29-year-old flier eased his gasoline-heavy Beechcraft off the runway at last night. Assumed favorable tailwinds most of the way, he expected to be over San Francisco in 17 hours, on the ground at Teterboro in 32. mm from out and buy an automobile on 211 At Missouri Valley, Iowa, more than persons were homeless irom VIAU MM., ____ ______ _____Al... n n A T51rT Tallin The dead man was George W. The Alsops tingency. Actually many responsible au- Russia Seen Redoubling War Plans By Stewart Alsop Washington The basic aims of Boviet policy remain the same, whe- ther Andrei Vishinsky or V. M. Mo- lotov is foreign minister. These aims, as they are now understood by many informed officials and expert ob- servers in Europe, will be discussed In the next report in this space. Yet those best equipped to speculate are Inclined to believe that Molo- tov's replacement by Vishinsky may presage an important -change, not In Soviet aims, but in Soviet meth- thorities here believe that the re- moval of V. M. Molotov from the foreign ministry and his replace- ment by Andrei Vishinsky, a man of lesser standing in Russia, means ithat the Soviets are about to in- 'tenslfy their internal programs and let up on communist expansion temporarily. This may mean a new period of extreme Russian Isola- tlonism. It may also mean further com- authorize tne munist crackdowns on the satellite! for m. countries of eastern Europe to research or training cure absolute control over the or foreign institutions, 01 tne re-jgardless Of whether they are pub-l privately operated, er Military Bills ods. To understand what Vishinsky's appointment is believed to mean, it Is necessary to examine the atti- tude of the Kremlin to the post of foreign minister before Molotov succeeded Maxim Litvinov in 1939. months credit today. Refrigerators, radios and televi- river. In Nebraska, sion sets, also had their installment buying limits raised to nearly two years. The Federal Reserve board, be- sieged by complaints of shopkeep- ers and car dealers, and after the nation's time buying feU of in I and disaster threatened some towns along the Missouri and Big Blue January for the a. bit. proval of the attorney general, would have authority to bring up to 100 aliens into the country every year In return for information from them. Representative Sasscer who had charge of armed services committee hearings, told the rules committee the bill would permit entry "of aliens with the highest potential intelligence value." Rep- resentative Brooks (D-La.) said open debate of the bill would cause the country "serious embarrass- time In three Johnson, about in his flooded 77, who drowned Missouri Valley, Iowa, home. The missl ng are Thomas M. Nolan, 22, and Charles Wermuth, 20, students at Crelghton university, Omaha, missing since j yesterday in the flooded area near; i Omaha. They were on a hunting Previously you had to pay when they disappeared ernments and peoples glon. Speculation continues that Moscow may be moving ually toward absolute, absorption! credit over in 18 under, in 15 months. Down payments were duced by the board to 15 per cent (previously it was State Traffic Crashes Kill 2 Over Weekend By The Associated Press Traffic accidents took the lives of Qther military bms persons in Minnesota over the _-, i A. ill CC UbLJCl j uiiiu i kWU iii of some of the eastern European i the injured In countries into the Soviet Union. tomorrow: 'other crashes were the wife and In addition, a few highly Placed wouid- I daughter of Lieutenant Governor inCnun-ini'if n VionOVP rnflT. J __ _ .i. _- .1 countries into the Soviet Union. In addition, a few highly placed Informants privately believe that Premier Stalin and his associates in the politburo may be preparing for a spring showdown with Mar- shal Tito over control of Yugosla- via. American officials say they would not be surprised If Russia and some of its completely con- trolled states neighboring Yugosla- via should move openly to crush Tito. Western officials frankly did not know over the weekend whether the Molotov-Vishinsky switch meant attlt de had something in toughening or softening of Rus- wth thaof attitudes toward the West. lish family to the family _ UBPtinn The solicitor is trusted to hour Meeting the unpleasant business of dealing; Discussed in Moscow with strangers. But he is expected) By Eddy Gilmore to obey orders. And he is not asked) to dinner he is one of the family. Foreign observers 1. Create the office of an under ]c. Elmer Anderson. secretary of national defense. Be would rank above the assistant sec- retaries of the Army, Navy and Air Force, and would be in charge of administrative work under the sec- retary of national defense. 2, Authorize establishment of a radar net to guard the nation's strategic air approaches. The system would be built in coop- eration with a similar warning screen being constructed by the Canadian government. 3. Put the Air Force to work building a proving ground to test guided missiles. The range, with its base and launching site in the continental United States, would be for the joint use of the Air Force, Army and Navy. definitely not here speclllaiedtoday whether theJThe total cost has been estimated _________ dramaticshif irSoviet" foreignat MOI OTOVS "TWO predecessors ministers might bring about new gory. Neither an "old bolshe- Influence in forming policy. By'the Politburo members, the foreign com missar's task was considered menial.j of Andre: Vishinsky J successor to V. M. Molotov might the groundwork for another try xszi of maintaining relations with the "bourgeois" world while the real Instruments of Soviet foreign policy, the international Communist parties, worked to destroy that world. Molotov's accession to the foreign ministry marked a basic change in the Kremlin's' concept of the foreign minister's role. Molotov is a member of the politburo, nnd has been con- sidered second only to Stalin in Molotov handled the last top- Truman Cheers Fire Heroine 14 year old fire heroine got a cheering note Berlin proDiem and today from President Truman. Roberta Lee, recovering from turns suffered when she saved her level discussions of the Berlin sit- four younger sisters and brothers nation in Moscow last summer, butifrom their burning home, received Vishinsky was present at most of this letter, signed by a Preslden- At Missouri valley, hardest hit town in the flood areas, the town also without gas, heat and water and authorities said none was in prospect for several days. All the town's inhabitants were to be in- oculated today against typhoid. Water still stood from three to three and one-half feet deep in more than 300 homes but it was re- ceding. Red Cross disaster relief head- quarters said It had spent to buy shoes for homeless children in the town, and Mayor Maurice M. Kirlin has asked Representative Jensen (R-Iowa) to apply for fed- eral relief funds. The trouble spots in Nebraska appeared to be the towns of Crete and Seward, in the Elkhorn valley. Volunteer crews worked through- out the night to protect the town of Ashland from the rising Platte and Elkhorn rivers and Wahoo and Salt creeks. Nebraska city escaped a flood crest of the Missouri river yester- day but hundreds of acres of near- by lowlands were inundated. Cold Weather Halts Threat Of Area Floods A drop In temperatures over the weekend and prospects cold wave Tuesday have reduced flood hazards In this area, according to the La Crosse Weather bureau station. The colder weather brought a and snow flurries for for tomorrow. MyrI D. McCorry, 27, Minneapolis, was killed early Sunday when the car in which he was riding skidded on an icy road at Clear Lake, and hit a telephone pole. Two others _ were Injured. They were taken to for but colder St. Cloud hospital. J Mrs. Anderson, the lieutenant governor's wife, and their daughter, Patricia, 4, were Injured Saturday! night in a headon crash between1 the Anderson car and a pickup truck whcih had! skidded on an icy road near St. Cloud. The lieutenant governor escaped injury. A passen- ger in the pick-up truck was In- jured but not seriously. Mrs. Julia Spika, Minneapolis, was killed Saturday and four other per- and drive to Winter Park where will speak and receive a degree some time after noon. fee made The Presi- lonely Hearts' Arraignment Fight Rages dent will fly back to Key West after lunch. It was reported by the Presl- __________ dent's associates that he wants chances of getting, two con- John L. Sullivan to remain as sec- retary of the Navy and W. Stuart Symington to stay on as secretary for air. fessed "lonely hearts" slayers for trial were apparently bettered to- day. Kent County Prosecutor Roger stop to freezing several days temperatures of above- j that sent numerous streams to near-flood! or flood stages. Tomorrow's cold wave will find the mercury dropping to about 10 degrees above zero, A. D. Sanial, j federal forecaster, said today. "This will mean that water from melting snow In the upper part of the state will be held back a good two Sanial pointed out. Streams Drop The feneral slacking off of high water stages found streams drop- ping as much as five feet. Sanial reported that the Zumbro other changes in Mr. Truman's ad- ministration will come gradually. The President himself said he had no other plans here than to work official papers Gown to him daily from the White House, except for his trip to Winter Park tomorrow. Spellman Refuses To Compromise In Cemetery Strike New York Cardinal Spellman has refused to soften his stand toward striking gravediggers at Calvary cemetery despite the pleas of their wives. "We got no place and -are dis- couraged and Mrs. Sig< river, which feet Sunday hit a peak of morning about 37.2 two feet over flood has dropped lOWiailUb WC1C II.IHHUCLUWH. f L f TIJ Some slight relief was promised to 32.9 feet and is falling fast today in the form of rising tern- The Root river at Houston reach- rot, hut. rower ed a peak of 14.1 feet about 4 p. m. Pope Requests No Celebration Vatican City Pope Pius 3OI expressed the wish today that no celebrations be held March 12, the tenth anniversary of his coronation. Instructions were sent to all ponti- Minn. They were returning from the funeral of a relative. Army Snow Rescues Cost Ten Million Washington (IF) The Army re- ported today it had cost the federal government an estimated for rescue work in -the snow bound areas of the Midwest during January ami February. tions under which the church strives- in many abroad emphasizing the people's concern "for the sorrowful condi- Catholic ___ Therefore, the usual receptions of- fered by pontifical representations abroad on the anniversary of the pontiff's coronation should not be held this year. Sunday, which was about a foot below flood stage. It dropped a foot yesterday and at present is re- corded at 9.8 feet. mund Czack said after a con- ference with the cardinal. She was one of a committee oi five women named to represenl families of the 240 strikers. They conferred with Cardinal Spellman to give him the strikers' side of the story. Grand Mich. New These same sources said that McMahon, who Is strongly opposed to Michigan's giving up the couple, said he did not plan to attend an extradition hearing In Lansing Tuesday. The two killings which the capture of Raymond M. Fernandez, 34, and Mrs. Martha Beck, 29, oc- curred near Grand Rapids in Kent county. McMahon said it was his personal desire that the couple "spend the remainder of their lives" In a Mich- igan prison. Life Is the maximum sentence in Michigan, while New York has a death penalty. McMahon contended Michigan, had an "airtight" case. There had been some doubt abouf the possi- bility of a first degree murder con- viction in New York. Michigan Attorney General Steph- en Roth, however, has ruled that this state can get the prisoners back if they're acquitted In New York. That seemed to weaken the case against their extradition. The couple is accused of killing Mrs. Deliphlne Downing, 29, and her baby daughter Rainelle near here last week. They are also charg- ed with .the murder of Mrs. Janet Fay, 50, In Valley Stream, N. Y. Machinist Wins Jackpot The cardinal promised us noth- ontinued. "He' back to work nine-room as union men house of Benjamin Hubert, he wouldno? aCw machinist is the focal where wlter'was rising-at of the strikers' committee toterest en s, Wis where the Trempealeau river i go back to work because they are ami is reported at the top of its banks, ringleaders. i Hubert's 58-year-old wife, Julie, The Trempealeau may hit its peak "The cardinal was nuow" this afternoon. At noon it stood at 5.9 feet. Mississippi Falls The Mississippi at Winona drop- ped to 6.01 feet today and will flcal diplomatic representatives continue falling, Sanial reports. nartnio'e nn-ar nf watpr has been reduced The flow of water has been reduced from locks at Alma down to No. 9 pool, Sanial said. Only at Hastings and Prescott, Wis., Is the river reportedly rising. Roads in this area are not block- ed by water, he .said. A section of highway 76 near Brownsville was flooded Saturday afternoon by the The commemoration of the event, swollen Root making it an informed Vatican source said, have a strictly religious char- acter." necessary to reroute traffic through Hokah. The tie-up lasted only a short time, however. VpriiJSst increase but not as union me: wants no part of the union." Clay Approves 19 German Sentences Berlin General Lucius D. Clay approved today the sentences of 19 Germans convicted of the mass murder of more than one million persons, mostly Jews. Thirteen were sentenced to die. The defendants were convicted by an American war crimes court at Nuernberg in April, 1948. the four-power meetings. i (The Russians have made a meeting of the Big Four foreign ministers on all German problems one of the conditions for lifting their Berlin blockade.) The appointment of Andrei A. old bolshevik he has been at old boisneviK ne nab ministry mea Stalin's right hand for almost 30, indication Anrf Mnlnrov s first act as JT 1 fc -L1JC that powerful body. Molotov is an ihe second spot m the _ hP has hPon at, meanwhile was no sweeping change in Soviet policy is In pros- pect. Gromyko has been an outstand- ing spokesman for the policies of Molotov, who, on the basis of offi- years. And Molotov's first act as foreign minister was to negotiate the Nazi-Soviet pact with the ob- scene Joachim von Ribbentrop. Until that time, it had been the cardinal rule of Soviet policy that, j announcements so far, contin- Sovlet aims could only ultimately bei achieved by the disintegration of! the non-Soviet followed by world revolution. The pact signal- ized the first Soviet attempt to substitute diplomacy for revolution. The Kremlin clearly expected that in his all-important jobs as first deputy prime minister and member of the policy-making pol- itburo. The announcement of Gromyko's promotion early yesterday caused no surprise at the U. S. embassy OLil V the consequence of the deal with where opim0n had already Hitler would be a war between thejbeen expressed that he was a likely (Continued on Page 6, Column 2.) I candidate to step into Vishinsky's ALSOPS [spot. tial secretary: "The President asked me to send you this note of good wishes while you are in the hospital. He feels sure that the courage and bravery displayed by you in rescuing your) little sisters and brothers will notj leave you now when you must bej patient and confident. i "Your presence pf mind in thej face of danger is most praise-wor-j thy, and the President is happy to I join your host of friends in ing you along the road to a rapid and complete recovery." Meanwhile. 24 union carpenters continued working without charge in building a new home for Rober- ta's family, and more gifts, money and letters arrived at Robert's bed- side. Just so Roberta won't have to worry about fire taking her new home from her, the Hartford Fire Insurance Company donated a five year all-coverage policy on the new Cape Cod style cottage. Plan to Abolish State Bookies Offered By Jack Mackay St. "rural legisla- tor-banker, Senator Hans C. Ped- ersen of Ruthton, today intro- a bill in the legislature to wipe out "bookies" which he claims are flourishing in Minn- eapolis and St. Paul. Senator Pedersen pointed to campaigns in Florida, New York and other states in "crack- ing down" on activities of "bookies" because of their "co- rrupting influence on many clean, young men." "They are responsible, to a great Pedersen said, "for the -corruption of your young people and from their operations stem the attempts to 'fix' players in athletic con- tests. "Many high school and col- lege youths lost their money by placing, bets periodically with these outfits. And, having lost their money, they are led into other questionable activi- ties trying to recover their los- ses." Pedersen's proposal would make it unlawful for a person or corporation to "incite, en- courage, foster or aid" in gambling through advertising and distribution of information- concerning laying of wagers or bets, or selling of "pools or betting odds" on any race, con- test or game. The lawmakers emphasized that the bill is drafted so that it applies to only organized to make profit from gambling and gambling "pools" through utilization of tele- graph, telephone and various other means. The bill further provides that it would be unlawful for such establishments to "post in his or its place of husiness or in a conspicuous place any betting odds or other gambling infor- mation." Telephone and telegraph companies would be prohibited from contracting with any per- son or corporation "for exclu- sive use of any telephone or wireless circuit or channel when such, company knows that the mcr-ea-se but not as union men. He Music" program. Within a matter of minutes after Mrs. Hubert Identified the mystery tune as "The Navy and the Army, the Army and the she was deluged with telephone calls and a mob outside the house. Police Seize Guns Before Indian Strike Calcutta, India Police have seized all guns and ammunition from the city's 15 gun shops. They (said their action was a precautlon- lary measure against the possible outbreak of violence Wednesday, when communists have called a rail- way and postal strike. The arms will be returned after the strike, police said. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Cloudy and rather mild tonight; low 28. Tuesday cloudy and colder with decidedly colder Tuesday night. High Tuesday 35. Strong northerly winds Tuesday. Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 44; minimum, 22; noon, 30; precipitation, none. Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, .41; minimum, 21; noon, 41; precipitation, none; sun sets tonights at sun rises to- morrow at Additional weather on page 13. same is to be used to aid, in- cite, foster or assist in any manner gambling, betting or wagering." Pedersen's measure would extend to all types of athletic football, baseball, hockey and the like also to political elections, horse races, auto contests and dog races. "It shall be one provision reads, "to record or forward any bet or wager, thing or consideration of value or wagered by or for another person upon the result of any trial or contest of skill, speed or power of endurance of man, machine or beast, or upon the result of any political appoint- ment or election.."   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication