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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, February 22, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 22, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              WEATHER Continued Mild SUPPORT YOUR Y.M.C.A. VOLUME 49, NO. 5 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 22, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Airport to Be Dedicated June Strong Atlantic Treaty Demanded By Jack Bell group of senators prepared today to flght any move which might water down the terms of the proposed Atlantic de- fense treaty in Senate debate. Five members of the Senate foreign relations committee said pri- vately they are ready to demand individually the strongest sort of pledge of an automatic war this country will its friends in Europe if they are threatened by communist ag- gression. It is their view that the tentative treaty language on this point, as shown the Senate foreign relations committee last week by Secretary Home Relief to All Needy Urged Close Ups Red Root Endangers U.S. Society By Upton Close immediate losers from Stalin's latest rough stuff are, as usual, the American com- munists. Again and again they have to "take it." They were do- ing well, indeed, when Moscow ordered the Hungarian puppets to condemn Cardinal Mlndszenty. They were playing horse with the Judge In the New York trial of the 11 communist heads (Foster left out of State Acheson, is satisfactory if it is not weakened in Senate debate. Language Secret The exact language has remained I secret but an Influential democratic senator said it will give signatory u Soclallst cabmet of Bollvla nations assurances the tnited States will not stand case of attack. Cabinet Quits In Bolivian Political Revolt Country Under 'State of Siege' Since Saturday La Paz, Repub- Idly by in: resigned yesterday to permit Presi- dent Enrique Hertzog to form a Some other senators said they coalition of all groups which sup- fear the drive to get approval the revolution of 1948. the treaty by the necessary two-j broadly representative cabl- that would destroy Us usefulness as a psychological weapon. Senator Var.denberg (R.-Mlch.) I already has told the Senate what psychological value of the proposed agreement between this country, Canada, Great Britain, France, Belgium, of bad four'the Netherlands and Luxembourg. because weeks while a week cost to the taxpay- ers and a hundred thousand dollars worth of publicity for com- munism. Tom Clark, our "minister of jus- tice" (1) was smoke-screening communist Infiltration as usual. Quacked he: "Whenever you hear there Is a communist under every desk In Washington that Is a slander on over govern- Inet is believed to have a better chance of meeting renewed threats of an extreme right wing d'etat. Bolivia has been under an offi- cial "state of siege" since Satur- day when the government claimed to have thwarted a plot by the Na- tionalist Revolutionary movement Congressional Reception May Be Cool By Francis M. Washington Lawmakers gave this answer today to President Truman's request for a vast ex- pansion of the social security sys- tem: Some of it may pass but not the whole thing. The bill Mr. Truman sent to Cap- itol hill yesterday proposed (A) Providing direct "home relief" to all needy persons; (B) Blanketing more persons under old ate insurance; (C) Greatly In- creasing the benefits; (D) Raising In some cases, tripling the tax on paychecks and pay rolls. It was the "home relief" idea which ran Into the closest scrutiny coupon Congress. Top Democratic managers of security legislation Chairman ment employes ask that per- son to name one, and then send the name to Tom Clark, and he will do the And how! THE CAKKS (actual name. do- by a Jnterwt talite fader Dictator-President any aggression >lberto was lynched. But Senator Donnell (R.-Mo.) al-i junta restored civil right ready has made it plain he will in- democratic freedoms which Vma- thPro no advance com- ro.'l had suppressed and in March, mltaenUeven an Hertzog, leader of the Re- tnaUhisCountry wlU right Publlcan Socialists, was inaugur- _.......reporter he hasn't ated president following an elec- SBCU the language submitted the foreign relations Committee, He! Many leaders of the M.N.R. went Intn pYilft in Argentina and Peru. ore will haveI to Judge "for'lflrSeir exile in Argentina and Peru. hens) caught by accident by the P.B.I., long wanted ringleaders of Canadian spy case, stood a good chance of not being extradit- ed a chance of being released as was Browder In an earlier ad- mlnlstratlon-Moscow love feast, or of being let out Indefinitely on ball, as Elsler was. But Cardinal Mlndszenty, whom the Hungarian under-secretary of state said would not be made a martyr much as he might wish it, j was condemned on orders of com- munist authority higher than the Hungarian government. The "Carrs" were thrown onto Ellis Island for deportation to Canada, where there is no Tom Clark to play clawless cat with Mickey Mouse. Judge Medina of the court trying the 11 commissars of the TJ. S. Communist party bucked up and ordered the pink lawyers to shut up and put up. state universities up. The smoothest! fellow-traveler (member of such organizations) in academic whether to oppose or support it, he said. Outright critics of the treaty are likely to gro much further than Donnell did In trying to tie down action under the measure. Mrs. Dorsey Badly Burned, House Razed Borbank, Jimmy Dorsey, wife of the orchestra leader, remained in serious condition today from burns suffered when fire de- stroyed most of the couple's home, a Tolucr- lake showplace. yes- terday that they had continued agi- ttition for overthrow of his regime by force from those countries. A government spokesman said the coup was "planned on Peruvian teiritory with the cooperation of thei Peruvian Ministry of Industry Alfonso Lloza." (In Lima, Peru, the Peruvian ministry of information denied that any Peruvian elements participat- ed in the abortive Bolivian revolt. (The army seized control of Peru Doughton (D.-N.C.) of the House ways and means committee and Chairman George (D.-Ga.) of the Senate finance committee took no position on the bill. The program would boost indi- vidual payroll taxes 100 per cent or more. The tax on a person mak- ing or more could be In- creased from a top of to a year. Would Cover The expanded Insurance program would cover a total of persons. Members of Congress said they had no idea how far unpre- cedented "home relief" program could go or what the over-all would be. Under this phase, the maximum! payment In which tha federal gov-l eminent would participate would be a month for one person; for the first additional person In a home, and for each additional person. States would contribute 401 old memories were recalled and to 75 per cent of the cost, according, old acQUBtatances renewed today Nlnety-Foor Tears Old and a resident of Winona since 1865, J. T. Bobb, 265 East Howard street, center above, was the oldest member of the Wlnona County Old Settlers association to attend the group's 81st annual meeting in the Red Men's wigwam this morning. With Mr. Robb are Mrs. Mary Tucker, 87, 608 Lake boulevard, a member of the association's reception committee, and H. M. Bierce, acting president of the association. In the background is the orchestra which played old- time music. Members of the orchestra, from left, are Dell Gleason, 468 West Banbom street; Rudls Houser, Wlnona route three, and Max Lewis, 105 East King street. Gleason and Houser are members of the original "Houser's who played for dances and celebrations in this area regularly Bepubllean-Henld photo by Merrltt Kefley more than 25 years ago. -OW Settlers Talk Over Early Days to state wealth. Such assistance from the fedwal Treasury's general fund, outside the Insurance program, now is lim- ited to needy aged persons, the and "has since blind, and dependent children. It: and has since October 31, 1948, ruled by decree.) An interior ministry communique !yeaf; said the country is now quiet with the administration In control. M.N.R. leaders in Bolivia, some of them former cabinet members, have been arrested. Police officl- to give any further de- Attendants at St. Joseph's hos- pital here added, however, that one-time beauty contest winner and dancer passed a "fair" night and rested well. She is 39. She was burned severely on the and face early yesterday when 131 a spectacular fire razed the 15-room circles, President Graham of the University of North Carolina, member of the Atomic commis- sion, is being questioned in his home state at last. Washington State university regents dismissed three communists are sticking to their decision despite pink threats to degrade the University The police department arson squad theorized that she was burn- ed when she tried to save valuables Wisconsin Trucker, Firemen Collide city firemen were injured last night in a colli- sion of their fire engine and a I (Mr. Truman, In response to a question at his news conference last Thursday, said he never had heard of a proposal to give "home relief" to aU needy people.) The new bill proposes ona other departure: Disability insurance, un- b 400 members of the Fillmore Recount Upholds Dry Vote Preston, Minn. PiU-jtln here Monday afternoon. more county officially was "dry" again today after the Winona County Old Settlers asso- ciation who met for their 61st an- nual session In the Red Men wig- wam. The group whose membership j is restricted to persons who havei resided in the county for 31 years j or longer began to file into wigwam before 10 a. m., and byi a. m. had congregated ten- deep around the door leading to the dining hall. Following lunch, members heard Introduced as evidence during yes- agaui wwy HILCV wic terday's 40-minute session, report) ported verdict of the county's special of an election recount made last liquor licensing election January 101 week by a special three-man can- had been affirmed at a hearing board revealed that the pro- fore Judge Martin A. Nelson of Aus-jposal to establish municipal liquor der which employes covered by old an address by Harry M. Reynolds, age insurance would get shorttlme sickness benefits. Doughton introduced the Presi- dent's legislation. But he told re- (Contlnued on Page E, Column 5.) HOME BELIEF from through the National Association make arrangelnents to cancel con- of University Professors. The tracts so that he could fly to her tlonil Council for American cation 420 Lexington avenue, New Tne said preliminary York 17, established to purge com- j investigation showed that apparent- munism out of our schools andjiy a defective furnace vent caused text books, has ready for release ure_ lists of fellow travelers on 30 other faculties as soon as regents show an interest. IN CHINA, too, the wolfisbness of communist leaders is showing. We begin to see the reason forj the scant credit given communist leaders Mao and Dju for over- throwing the Chiang Kai-shek na- tionalist government. Ten years ago Moscow degraded its Chinese favorite Lt Li-san to "up" Mao and Dju. LI went through a long period of contrition. Now, right on top of the communist occupation of all North China, Li Li-san ap- pears again, backed by Russian force in Manchuria, taking away from Mao and Dju, for direct Rus- sian rule, the only area of China that produces industrial surpluses and is industrialized thanks to the Japs. Manchuria has been marked for full inclusion into Rus- sia at China's expense, just as the eastern half of Poland! Stalin's empire will then stretch from the Baltic to the Pacific-warm water, as did the Czar's temporarily. One truth comes out of the Hun- garian spectacle. The Catholic church does not want war. The clergy throughout western Europe that almost complete de- struction would strike its congre- gations and properties before the United States could step in, and even then we might fail to win! Whether or not this defeatist at- titude is Justified, every American who prefers to live here rather than in Russia will agree with the injured church on the job of tear- ing the communist cancer, root and branch, out of American so- ciety, ._ semitrailer truck driven by Jo- seph Krary, 31, of Sauk City, Wis. thp librarv where the fire! of the flreroen were serl" SLarlBd hurtaThey are Captain Pat- on her bed by the Dorsey McNamara, 62, and Martin Ben Murphy, 66, an old time actor. Dorsey, on a southern tour with1 his orchestra, was in touch with his wife's doctor and was trying to 33. The mishap occurred as the fire- men were responding to an alarm. Krary is employed by the Mercury Motor Freight Lines of Chicago. He was charged with damaging city property, failing to yield the right-of-way to an emergency ve- hicle, and driving a vehicle of ex- cessive overall length. He posted bond for appearance in safety court March 15. Use of Draft Urged to Aid U. S. Reserves Suffering From Serious Burns, Mrs. Jimmy Dorsey, 39, wife of the famous band leader, is treated at a Hollywood, Calif., hospital by Dr. Carl E. Lund. She was carried through a wall of flames by Washington Use, Of the draft law to boost the National Guard and Army reserve branches to over men for "security" reasons has been urged by a civilian- military study committee. The committee, headed by former secretary of state and Supreme Court Justice James F. Byrnes, said last night the cost would be large but cannot afford a cheaper program. "Our full strength must be main- tained to preserve the peace of the the committee, named by President Truman, said in urging the expansion. The group proposed an Army National Guard of and an Organized Reserve Corps of for a total of with the selective service law providing the desired strength, if necessary. The group suggested that the state retain control of National Guard units as at present. The National Guard now about men, far less than i the it had last June when 'volunteers flooded recruiting offices to avoid the draft. Prewar strength was men. Present reserve strength figures were not available. Wadena Boost In School Bonds voters In a special election yesterday approved a increase in the worth of bonds voted last June for a new six-room grade school build- ing. The boost was made necessary by building cost increases since her butler as fire swept her home in Toluca States. .were drawn. Winona county Centennial observ- ance chairman and president of the state Congress of Parents and Teachers, and then opened a busi- ness session for the election of officers. At this afternoon's business ses- sion, the group drafted a resolu- tion which will be sent to the Wi- nona .board of county commission-! ers recommending1 that a room on the third floor of the courthouse! building be used as a museum for' the collections of relics and 'his- torical documents1 held by the Old Settlers and the Winona County Historical associations. H. M. Bierce, acting president (Continued on Page 10, Column 4.) OLD STEELEES 'stores in the county had been de- feated by an 80-vote margin. First unofficial returns of the election In- dicated that the measure had been turned down by 71 votes. Fillmore county, which has been "dry" for the past 30 years, has been Involved in a heated dispute over the election results for more than a month since a canvassing board dis- covered an alleged discrepancy in the reported vote count svhich versed the originally-reported sults of the election. Count Cited The canvassing board cited the vote count in Norway township McQuillen Leads Rochester Primary Rochester, Minn. Mayor Claude H. McQuillen wiH have Thomas M. McDonnel, a service station operator, as his opponent In the March 8 general election here. The incumbent paced the field as voters selected their candidates in yesterday's primary, featured by a turnout of about 38 per cent of the registration isults to the county auditor ap- Candidates for treasurer are Karl j Proved liquor licensing by a 120-23 re- re- which had first reported a 120-23 vote opposing the measure while re- was not i In the only other contest, Third Ward Alderman Harold R. Aken- head' was eliminated. Successful candidates who will seek his berth are John P. Miner, a real estate man, who drew 567 votes, and Ray- mond P. McPherson, a semipro base- ball player with 478. majority. Guenther J. Overland, chairman of the Norway township election board, immediately contested the canvassing board decision and, after a two-week legal wrangle, Judge Nelson ordered the appointment of a special canvassing board to make a recount of all ballots cast in the election. Monday's hearing convened at p. m., and Judge Nelson ren- dered his decision at p. m During the brief session Reuben jwordleman of Bloomfleld township a member of the three-man board reviewed his group's action and other members of the special boarc called to confirm his remarks Total Announced It was revealed that the final offl- Alfred Ivnt And Lynn Fontanne, center, husband and wife act- ing team, and Playwright S. N. Behrman, right, arrive at Madison, Wis., yesterday for the world premiere of Behnnan's play, "I Know My Love." Alfred and Lynn take the leads in the play which has its world premiere at the University of Wisconsin Union Memorial theater at Madison today. (AP. Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald.) Hopes Mount For Airline Service Then Gen. Vandenberg Invited to Be Principal Speaker Wlnona's new airport will be de- dicated In ceremonies June 4 ind 5, and the possibility that airline service can be Inaugurated then hag received further Impetus. Thte dates for the dedication were set by the city council Monday eve- ning on recommendation of Co- Managers William A. Galewski and Roy T. Patneaude. The commanding general of the U. S. Army Air Forces, Hoyt S. Vandenberg, been Invited to be the principal speaker. Simultaneously the council heard that action has been begun to clear one of the major obstacles to the inauguration of airline ser- vice here by Northwest Airlines. The co-managers have asked the federal Civil Aeronautics board to deactivate the certification of m nonoperating airline to serva Wi- nona, paving the way for Northwest. That action was taken, it was revealed, In response to a letter from Northwest President Croll Hunter. The letter follows: "I very much appreciated ths editorial appearing in the Janu- ary 18th issue of The Republi- can-Herald, which you sent to me, as it was highly Informative and complimentary to North- west. "We 3W, of course, thoroughly cognizant of the many out- standing characteristics of your fine community and Its splendid new airport. It is obvious that an Important city such as Wl- nona. must have adequate sche- duled air service. "As you know, the ClvJI Aero- nautics board awarded a oertl- flcate of public convenience and necessity to Parks Air Trans- port, Inc., In North central case on December 19, 1948, and was named therein. We are advised, that to date, Parks Air Transport have not acti- vated any of the routes awarded them by the CAB, although they have expressed Intention of doing so In the near future. "It Is obvious that the atten- tion of the Civil Aeronautics board should be called to this situation and probably a pro- ceeding Initiated to re-examine the air service needs of Wlnona, and the current stsitus of Parks Air Transport's ability to fulfill its obligations. "As you know, this Is a matter entirely under the Jurisdiction of the Civil Aeronautics board and your request should be ad- dressed to that board. "Again, assuring you that very much appreciate your in- terest, I am, with kindest per- sonal regards, Sincerely yours. Croll Hunter Mr. Hunter thanked the council for its resolution requesting North- west service. For the dedication itself, Council (Continued on Page 5, AIRPORT Appleton Widow Sues Delta Airlines Appleton, Wls., woman filed a damage suit against Delta Airlines yesterday In connection with a crash which took the life of her husband last March. She is Mrs. Mary L. Courtney, wi- dow of Daniel J. Courtney, an Ap- pleton woolen goods manufacturer. Courtney was killed last March 10 when a Delta airliner crashed from clal vote of the election was in an altitude of 600 feet a short dls- opposition to the measure and tance from the Chicago Municipal for licensing. airport. Judge Nelson ruled that 81 ballots Mrs. Courtney's suit charged that which had been disqualified by the an excessively steep climb caused canvassing board should be admitted! the plane to stall and crash. The into the vote count. "The intention of the voter on each of these ballots is easily appar- Judge Nelson stated, "and the technicality Involved in the count is not sufficient to warrant the disqual- ification of the ballot." Baby Sitting Aids Veteran's Grades Stale College, Pa. Baby sitting, says a married 30-year-old Navy veteran, helps Improve college grades. Russell T. McLauchlan, balding father of a two-year-old daughter, accident claimed 12 lives. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Cloudy to- night. Wednesday partly cloudy; continued rather mild. Low tonight 28; high Wednesday 40. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 34 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 35; minimum, 26; noon, 32; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at EXTENDED FORECAST _ Minnesota, Wisconsin Tempera- flunked out of Pennsylvania tures will average three-six degrees State College before he normal. Normal maximum 24 this secret to better marks. j northern Minnesota, ranging to 35 "The children go to bed southern Wisconsin. Normal min- McLauchlan says "and that leaves! nimum four northern Minnesota, the evening free for study." McLauchlan, a Philadelphian, ranging to 17 southern Wisconsin. Above normal Wednesday and originally worked part-time as a Thursday. Somewhat colder Friday short order cook but he gave it up j and Saturday. Precipitation will when his marks tumbled. Then less than one-tenth inch, tried baby-sitting. His own daughter? "Oh, Mrs. McLaucalan sits with occurring as scattered light snow northern sections Wednesday and scattered light rain or snow about   

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