Share Page

Winona Republican Herald: Monday, February 14, 1949 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 14, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              VOTE IN CITY PRIMARY TODAY POLLS OPEN UNTIL 8 P. M: VOLUME 48, NO. 305 WINONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 14, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES Pope Flays Hungarian Persecutors M m Another Storm Hits West, Cold In California Strong Winds Lash Southeastern Kansas, Texas By The Associated Press The misery-dealing great plains; blizzards had opened up a broad j new front In North Dakota today! with the worst 24 hours of weather1 the West has had in two weeks. Six North Dakota counties were added to the disaster area as a result of weekend storms which stalled relief and rescue operations In some parts of Nebraska and re- duced them by 50 per cent In others. A minor tornado damaged a few buildings at Edna, in southeastern Kansas, and at Alvarado, Texas, strong winds lifted some residences from foundations and scattered them over a wide area. There were no fatalities at either place, but dam age at Alvarado was estimated at In Southern California, tempera- tures sank deep Into sub-freezing levels again, necessitating more or- chard heating. Minimum readings of 24 degrees were expected today In some sections of the citrus fruit region. 500 Rescued The 500 passengers on three trains stalled for several days at Rawlins and Hanna, Wyo., were rescued and taken to Cheyenne in buses. The new North Dakota emergency area embraces six southwestern counties. Additional snow fighting equipment was moved Into the square mile area today from other sections where the need for it was less acute. The Red Cross has begun a survey of urgent need with the use of six ski planes. Farmers and At St. Paul ranchers were reported in need She food and fuel. I Miss Mary Durey, 17-year-old Springfield high school girl, is the queen of the Minnesota Ter- ritorial Centennial which is be- ing observed throughout the state this year. She was chosen at the St. Paul Winter Carnival yesterday in a contest with beauties from 36 other districts of the state. Miss Durey repre- sented the New Ulm district. (A. P. Wlrephoto to The Repub- lican-Herald.) St. Paul The St. Paul winter carnival hit another high point Sunday when Minnesota's territorial Centennial queen was se- lected at festivities that brought out all carnival royalty. The queen is Miss Kary Durey, 17-year-old Springfield High school reign over scores PCSe of events throughout the state dur- quarters for the rescue work at Fort Lincoln in Bismarck and ordered 24-hour duty at the post. Two crews have been dispatched on 50-mile snow-removal drives, one Mott in Hettinger county, the other from Belfleld to Bowman. Prospects were that weather condi- tions would not be favorable for the work. General Pick said that the storm In some parts of Nebraska was the worst in the relentless series since February 2. At Nellgh and Alliance work of removing the snow was virtually halted during the worst of the Saturday storm, and at Val- entine about 80 per cent of the equipment had to be withdrawn from operations. 931 Miles of Road Open In South Dakota, the Army had opened 921 miles of roads but thel-p openheaa-ing 1949 as Minnesota celebrates its 100th birthday. Brown-haired, hazel-eyed Miss Durey was selected from a field of 37 contestants. She is the daughter New Jewish Parliament In Session 120-Man Assembly Will Write New Constitution of the first modem Hebrew parliament assembled here today, nine months to the day after the new Jewish state was first proclaimed. The 120-man assembly will write a permanent constitution and work out a government to succeed the provisional regime that has hand- led the nation's affairs to this time. The meeting in Jerusalem, an- cient Hebrew capital, emphasized Israel's claim to the city. The United Nations assembly has instructed the Palestine concilia- tion committee to work out a plan to internationalize Jerusalem, a holy city to three religious sects: Jews, Christians and Moslems. However, Prime Minister David Ben-Gurlon last night repeated Is- rael's claim to Jerusalem and said it would remain a Jewish city. The Jewish population now lives in about four-fifths of the city. The Arab legion holds the old wall- ed city, with Egyptian troops sta- tioned to the south in the Bethle- hem hills. United Nations observ- ers and the conciliation commis- sion have their headquarters in a southern sector. Recognized by 40 Nations The first day's meeting will see deputies sworn in. Dr. Chalm Welz- mann, president of the state's first provisional council, is scheduled to speak. Dr. Weizmann, one of the out- standing figures In world Jewry, Is' expected to be elected by the as- sembly the first president of the permanent government. The new state already has been recognized by 40 nations. Thousands of pennants In blue Construction of New 'Y' to Start This Spring: Drive Opens Friday of Mr. and Mrs. William Diirey white _ the colors of the first This Is The Architect's Drawing of Wlnona's new Y. M. C. the campaign for which gets under way this week. Its impressive 29- foot-high portico will face Wlnona street, at West Fourth street. This drawing shows a thlrd_ dormitory section. However, the current campaign goal does not include funds for building that section. Russia Attempting to Crush All Opposition in Red Bloc By Edward E. Bomar European assaults on churchmen have stirred American suspicions that Moscow may be getting ready to discard the "peoples democracy" system in Soviet Satellites. They also have revived the idea that Russia is moving toward absorbing the Soviet bloc states into an expanded Soviet union. Top authorities on relations with the communist world said today the trend appears to be in these directions, although it is too early to be sure either will come about. Officials are virtually unanimous, however, on one point: under pressure from Moscow the process of shaping the Springfield, and represented nation In years New Ulm district In the contest. greeted assembly delegates on Herzl snow. Despite additional snowfall of The carnival queen of the snows will be selected at ceremonies Tues- day evening. Also selected Sunday were Cen- tennial princesses from seven con- gressional districts. They are Jac- queline Davis, Faribault, first dis- trict; Lois Anderson, St. Peter, sec- ond; Jo Ann Hemqulst, Almelund, third; Lois Fitch, Park Rapids, sixth; Trese Carstens, Redwood Patricia Pagnucco, and Betty Ann Gulrud, Thief River Falls, ninth. Miss America Withdraws from two to six Inches in Only note of discord In the queen the Union Pacific railroad hoped was withdrawal of BeBe clear today the last stretch of its! Shopp, Miss America, from the pro- snow-clogged right-of-way Edward S. Shopp, Hopkins, Kawllns and Rock Springs, father of the Miss America, said and to resume operations of his daughter was "not given a posl- but strong winds again were whip- tion on the stage with visiting Dine up new drifts. Two tralnloads queens" so "I could not permit her street, the city's main thoroughfare. A gate of honor was erected for jthem on a Judean peak where the road from Tel Aviv enters the city. The first spring sunshine bathed the city yesterday after a long period of rain and snow. Today is the feats of trees, an ancient He- brew spring festival. It has been observed in more recent years as Palestine day. Delegates met in the Jewish agency building near the walls of the old city. War at Standstill The Israeli-Arab war was at a standstill as the new assembly met. This war began simultaneously with the birth of Israel last May after Britain surrendered Its 25-year mandate over Palestine. tr.N. ne- gotiations aimed at a permanent ping up of hay arrived at Green River yes- terday and ranchers started clear- Ing roads for quick movement of to appear." Miss Shopp was to have played the vibraharp. She took a one day leave from the feed to their hungry livestock her contract at jthe Jack Frost final meeting of the Jewish pounds, 20.6 and 16.7. herds. Freezing rain was reported falling today In portions of Illinois, Mis- souri, Kansas, Oklahoma and North i carnival in Fargo, N. D., to make the St. Paul appearance. In other events Sunday, nearly Texas with the rainfall extending i fishing contest at White Bear lake, eastward through the Ohio valley An estimated spectators look- to New York and ed on. central New England. northwestern Wisconsin, northen satellites into the Soviet mold has now been speeded up. Authorities read this meaning into, Hungary's trial of Cardinal Mlnd- szenty and defiance of American displeasure, the indictment of 15 j churchmen In Bulgaria, and the! current purges In Poland and! Czechoslovakia. A by-product of the Mindszenty trial was the case of Selden Chapin, Americans Still Eat Very Well peace have been under way atipoundSi 388 Washington Americans are expected to eat about as well this year as last, the Agriculture department said today. A survey of food supply prospects and of consumer buying power Indi- cates, It said, that an average eater will munch through the following (compared with last year and the 1935-39 prewar Meats 145 pounds this year, 146 last year and 126 before the war. Eggs 380 eggs, 388 and 298. Chicken 47.5 pounds dressed weight, 48.6 and 37.3. Turkey 3.8 pounds, 3.5 and 2.6. Fluid milk and cream 370 340_ seven pounds, 6, and that Israel will oppose the interna-i5.5. tlonalization of Jerusalem at the Condensed and evaporated milk ed assembly. This was the repre- sentative body of the Jewish com- munity In Palestine under the Kuhn Protests 10-Year Term By Richard K. OTMalley Munich, Germany Fritz Kuhn, 52, former German-American Bund leader, angrily protested to- day against German justice on ap- peal from his ten-year sentence as a major Nazi offender. and peared before a three-man German appellate court. He was sentenced In absentia after he escaped from prison at Dachau, near Munich. He later was recaptured and has determined toTcrush been held since in a prison camp Construction of Wlnona's new Warns Society Attacking Churcli Can't Endure Declares Faithful Bound to Resist Unjust Civil Laws By Frank O'Brien Vatican City Pope Puu XH declared today that when a civil government contradicts divine and human rights "bishops and the faithful themselves are bound by their conscience to resist unjust laws." Addressing a secret and extra- ordinary consistory of the College of Cardinals ol the Roman Cath- olic church on the case of Josef Cardinal Mlndzenty, the Pontiff asked prayers to the end that: who rashly trample upon the liberty of the church and the rights of human conscience may at length understand that no civil so- ciety can endure when religion been suppressed and God, as It were, driven Into exile." The Pope said "Our soul Is crushed with most bitter grief" by the trial and condemnation of the Hungarian primate. In a brief speech to 16 cardinals closeted with him In the Consis- torlal hall of the Apostolic palace, the Pontiff declared the Hungarian primate's trial had not been fairly Y.M.C.A. will start this spring. That was revealed today by the "Y" board of directors, who also released details of the construction and a drawing of the projected structure prepared by Bertram A. Weber, Chicago architect, In co-op- eration with the building bureau of the' National council, YJVI.CA, The drive to finance the construction will begin this week Friday, when the special gifts solicl- tr. S. minister to Hungary. Hungary charged that Chapln was involved with the cardinal In his alleged offenses, and asked the diplomat's removal. The U. S., disputing this, called Chapln home "for consulta- tion." The tr. S. expelled a Hun- garian legation aide in retaliation for the forcing out of two U. S. representatives from Budapest. The Mlndszenty case, the .Bul- garian, Polish and Czechoslovakian developments all are taken here to support the conclusion that the Butter 10.6 pounds, 10.1 the last remaining opposition quick- ly so as to present a solid front against the western world. The satellite "peoples democracies" permit a continued existence of seme opposition political parties, while the communists have a free rein in putting their totalitarian system into effect. The course of recent developments has been in the direction of one-party states like anglers tried their luck in a British mandate. The old assembly was dissolved after the meeting. His statement served as a formal notice to the U.N. Palestine con- Ai Thoemke, St. Paul, won first; cuiation commission of the new Temperatures were below zero in prize with a five and three quarter pound northern pike. state's position. It was also Interpreted as a re- 256 and 235. 16.7. Other food fats 325 32.1 and 28. Fresh fruits 133 and 137.7. Fresh vegetables 256 pounds, What has taken place In Bulgaria last two months is expected lav-w-wm, j ne J Iowa Minnesota, the Dakotas, east-j Events today included northwest ply to diplomatic and consular Sugar 90 to 95 pounds, 36 and ern Montana and parts of handball championships, of foreign powers Wyoming and Nevada. In the southland squash rackets competition, con- declined invitations to attend the; m northwest and eastern sections of; tract bridge tournament, finals in the country the mercury was around! the national drum majorette contest and figure skating exhibitions. ______ ......____ Flour and flour in bread and the new assembly (bakery products 136 pounds, 136 because it is being held In Jeru- and 152. salem. by officials to set the pattern for the other communist-run countries. In Bulgaria the communists and so- cialists combined forces to form an overwhelming dominant workers party which Is communist in all but the label. of combining socialists with the communists. The one step remaining Coffee 17.5 pounds, 18.4 and 14.communlst. canvass will start March 1. Wlnona firms and individuals have already contributed The new said the directors, will be entirely fireproof. It will be j built of reinforced concrete, faced with brick, and highlighted with limestone and granite. The main block of the building, which will face Wlnona at West Fourth street, will measure 139 by 118 feet, but as its longest dimension the "Y" will measure 185 by 118 feet. Its Winona street frontage will be 118 feet, and that dde will be domi- nated by a 29-foot high portico which will sweep across the center section. A boys' entrance and a men's entrance will be at opposite ends of this limestone portico. These two main entrances will be of Min- nesota granite. The directors said that it Is planned to advertise for bids March 15 and to open them 30 days later so that the winning contractor can begin construction at the start of the construction season. Construc- tion would take about 18 months. Bids will be accepted for a two- story and also for an alternate, which will include construction of a third- story dormitory section. However, the goal of the current campaign does not include funds for Less than 30 spectators watched construction of that dormitory sec- at Nuernberg. Questioned about the purposes of the German-American Bund, Kuhn denied it had political ties with the third German reich, and strove only to cement relationships between the two countries. At a court recess Kuhn gestured angrily and cried: "This German court justice, it is not justice. You don't get justice in a German court." Asked if he would prefer an American court, he replied loudly, reported. "The Object of Trial principle object of the the Pope said, "was to dis- rupt the Catholic church in Hun- gary and precisely for the purpose set forth in the Sacred Scripture: "'I shall strike the shepherd and the sheep of the flock shall be dis- persed.'" (Mat. XXVI, The Pope declared Cardinal Mindszenty's physical condition during the trial was "inexplicable except as the result of secret in- fluences which may not be pablicly tation is opened. The general gifts revealed; to prove this there is the time." as Kuhn testified. Asked if he would make an at- tempt to return to America if freed from his sentence, Kuhn said: "America, excuse me, I am too Poland likewise is in the process nervous to talk about that now These German courts. This is the first time I ever have appeared be- is to outlaw all parties but the fore a German court. It is not justice here." The Candidates For Mayor Vote: J. Roland Eddie, taking time out from his laundries to vote, comes out of the voting booth at the second precinct of the second ward; Walter Dopke, about to leave on a business trip to La Crosse, confirms his legal voting residence to Mrs. A. W. Schmeling, election judge at the same pre- cinct (two mayoralty and two aldermanic candidates were voting In the same High Cyril Smith, whose off-sale liquor store is closed because of the election gives his bal- lot to John Wise at the second of the first ward as Mrs. Smith and daughter Stephanie watch the proceedings in the West End fire station. Voting was extremely light early in the day. RepnMican-Bferald photos tlon. The goal Is based on the es- timated cost of a "Y" without the dormitory section. It is not planned to build the third-story dormitory at the present time unless extremely favorable bids are received. fact that a man endowed with tie full vigor of a forceful nature sue. denly appears weak and mentally unbalanced." Ths Pontiff branded "completely false" the Hungarian government's assertions that "the whole question at issue was that this apostolic see to furtherance of plans for political domination of nations gave Instruc- tions to oppose the republic of Hungary and its rulers." "We are the Pontiff told the 16 assembled princes of the Roman Catholic church, "what the outraged rights of the church and the dignity of the human person clearly demand." All Involved Dropped This apparently was a reference to the excommunication of all those involved in the arrest, trial and imprisonment of the Hungar- ian primate and his sentencing to life imprisonment In Budapest last week. The Pontiff's allocution contained no mention of further ecclesiastical punishment. 'It was a speech phrased in sor- row rather than anger. "Let us all pray to God fervent- the Pope said, "that those who suffer persecution, imprison- ment and hardship, may be con- soled with the necessary help of Divine Grace, that those who rashly trample upon the liberty of the church and the rights of .hu- man conscience may at length un- derstand that no civil society can endure when religion has been suppressed and God, as it driven into exile." The Imprisonment of the Hun- garian cardinal was "a most serious outrage which inflicts a deep wound (Continued on Page 4, Column 2J POPE WEATHER If the bids are unusually favor- FEDERAL FORECASTS __ Winona and vicinity: Mostly able and only a relatively small dowdy with occasional snow and amount of additional money would cloudy and warmer. Low to- be required to build the dormitory mgnt 14; high Tuesday 30. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. Sunday: section, the third story would be built, the indicated. The projected the two stories high. At the rear of the main building by 118 be a 44 by 46 foot addition for two band- ball courts, each. 20 by 40 feet. The building will be generally 29 feet high, except that the gymna- sium, approximately in the center of the building, will rise to a height Maximum 32; minimum, 9; noon, 15; precipitation, trace inch of Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 16; minimum, noon, 10; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Prec. Bemidji 2 18 Denver 23 10 Des Moines 10 1 Duluth 12 Int. Falls Kansas City of 42 feet. This gymnasium will bejChicago 38 over the swimming pool. Both the gymnasium and the pool will have glass block windows, while all other windows in the new "Y" will be double hung aluminum win- dows. The reinforced concrete will be faced entirely with brick, although the trim and portico will be "of limestone. In addition, limestone will form the base course around the structure. -14 Los Angeles .......50 Miami............76 Mpls. St. Paul 5 New Orleans.......79 New York.......... 56 Seattle 35 28 13 33 72 Phoenix 55 Washington '.......68 Winnipeg 67 51 33 34 52 .10 .02 .03 .02 .02   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication