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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, January 18, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 18, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              VOLUME 48, NO. 282 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES City Requests to Legislature Drawn __________________________________---------------------- m A m it Pre-lnaugural Rites Keep Truman Busy By Max Hall Truman, a man with a pay raise and; a new lease, gets out his dinner jacket today and starts celebrat- iriET His inauguration for a new term as President will take place at 11 a. m, Thursday. This flag-decked city of nearly Is considerably agitated about it, with the prospect of several] hundred thousand visitors adding- themselves to the confusion, j .---------------------------------------------Mr. Truman has Just about ished his inaugural address. It is expected, to be a foreign policy speech primarily, although it would not be surprising if he also talks about his "fair deal" domestic pro- gram as a foundation for foreign policy. Voted Kaije Yesterday Congress completed ac- tion on a bill raising the President's regular salary from to a year, and raising his tax-free expense allowance from to Tonight Mr. Truman and his fam- ily are drawn into the storm of festivities that has begun roaring here. They will break bread with members of the Truman- Barkley club at a formal dinner. That's only the beginning. To- j morrow the President appears at a I Democratic party luncheon (Then a reception given by the gov- iernor of Missouri Then a din- ner of the presidential electors Charles Ponzi Dies in Rio Charity Ward Charles Ponzl Rio De Janeiro (IP) Charles PonzJ, whose financial swindles rooked Americans a generation ago, died Saturday in a hospital charity ward. His body still lay unclaimed today In a public morgue. When death came, he was semi- paralyzed and partly blind. He was unable to move his left arm or leg. Most of the sight had gone from his right eye. He was 71. Ponzi's colossal financial hoax was perpetrated in 1920. He promised 50 per cent returns within 45 days. When he finally was brought to book on charges of using the malls to defraud, federal Investigators estimated he had bilked Am- ericans of more' than President Traman, center, gets silver plaque as the "champion of world peace" from A.F.L. Presi- dent William Green, left, and an honorary membership in the American Federation of Musicians from James C. Petrillo, president, during White House ceremony. President Truman plays the piano. (A.P. Wirephoto.) Youngdahl Budget Due Wednesday Then a fantastic concert and stage show known as the "Inaugural to be held in a huge armory. By Adoiph Johnson On Thursday, the big day, Mr. gt Youngdahl on Wednesday will hand S-year the legislature "the bill" for the broad program he outlined in term, after having been President! his inaugural message two weeks ago. Death of Baker Heir Puzzles Florida Police Fall of Peiping Expected Within 3 Days City Officials Granted Power To Decide Fate By Spencer Moosa were strong Indications today that historic Peiping would surrender or fall the communists shortly. National Commander General Fu Tso-yi's own newspaper hinted at the expected turn of events here. His newspaper, Ping Min Jih Pao, asserted the National governnment in Nanking had authorized Peiping officials to decide for themselves on peace or war. But whatever the decision, the encircling communists made It plain they would dictate the terms. The reds turned deaf ears to a proposed mission from Peiping to talk terms. The reds reportedly said they want- ed total surrender. With Tientsin, 90 miles south- east, and Tangku, Tientsin's port city, already in communist hands, the ration short populace of Peiping had little choice. Ping Min Jih Pao said "Peace negotiations are now under way" but gave no inkling whether these involved any part of China other Council Asks More On-Sale Pay Adjustments By Adolph Bremer The city council, concerned each biennium with lobbying in the Minnesota legislature for passage of laws affecting Wlnona, passed a five-point legislative program Monday evening. The program, consisting of a series of resolutions for presenta- tion to the three Winona county legislators, includes: for three years, nine months, and about eight days. Then comes a mammoth parade up Pennsylvania avenue to the White House with volleys of warplanes shooting across the sky. Took First Oath Quietly When he first became President there was no lnaugural--addressr.no parade, no celebration. The nation was hushed in a great tragedy. Franklin D. Roosevelt had died. Vice-President Truman hurried to the White House and took the oath, with primness and humility. That] was April 12, 1945. Roosevelt made four Inaugural addresses In his time. It has been Both houses have agreed to his request that they meet in joint session at 10 a. m, Wednesday to hear his budget message. He deliver the message in person. Nine Game, Fish Men Suspended For Violations St. Paul 20 years since an Inaugural addressj connected wlth by of conservation President except Roosevelt. Nine employes state depart- were sus- pended today by Frank D. Blair, Mr. Truman, it apepars will of the Minnesota game and up where Roosevelt left division, on charges of violat- keynote of striving toward a dur-jjng deer hunting regulations in St. The governor Is required by law to give the legislature detailed esti- mates of the cost of running the state for the next two years and suggest ways of raising the money. tfntil he actually delivers it, con- tents of the budget will be secret. However, the governor has given ad- vance hints about it. For some weeks he has been say- ing that it will be necessary to scrape the bottom of the barrel just to keep present activities going. Such im- provements as his mental health program will require new money. Tax Study Asked Several weeks ago the governor said he had asked the tax depart- ment to explore the entire tax field for new sources. And he has said that some present taxes will have to He was deported from the UnitediaDie peace..For that was Roosevelt's Croix state park. States to_his..native Italy_and he theme four yeals ago. And Mr. Tru- The njnei six of whom have came to Brazil in about 1930. man, in a possible prelude to his Doctors said hardened arteries] inaugural address, said In his "State and a blood clot in the brain caused !0f the Union" message January 5: his death. Trial of 12 Top U. S. Reds Slows Down New York making trial of The history- 12 top American communists, slowed down at the start by lengthy arguments of de- fense counsel, headed into a new lepal skirmish today. The main question before the "The heart of our foreign policy is peace our guiding star is the principle of international coopera- tion." The Inauguration will give the country a vice-president for the first time since 1945. Senator Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky will take the vice-presidential oath on the same platform with the President. North Dakota Discusses Bonus veterans' bon- us question took the stage today in the North Dakota legislature. Senate bill 1, which provides for a bond issue to pay the bonus and earmarks increased cigar- court was whether trial of 11 the defendants should proceed ofjette and liquor taxes to1 help pay off bonds was slated for a hearing once In the absence of the William Z. Foster, communist na- tional chairman, who is ill with a heart ailment. That issue was left unsettled at the end of yesterday's opening ses- sion in federal court, where the de- fendants face charges of working for forcible overthrow of the gov- ernment. Defense lawyers were turned down in a lonp series of delaying of which had been arpucd before. U. S. Attorney John F. X. Mc- Gohey moved for immediate trial of the il men present and asked a separate trial for the (17-year-old Foster, who was not in court. Lawyers for the defense contend before the senate finance and taxa- tion committee. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and begin- ning this afternoon or early tonight. Wednesday occasional snow flurries; pleaded guilty to the violations and Tallahassee, Fla. (IP) Thej than Peiping. death of wealthy Grenvllle Baker, j Occasional communist shells whis- who was found beside his wrecked tie into the city One fell 150 feet jeep with a pistol wound in his head, presented a puzzle to police today. A coroner's Jury, after four hours of testimony from witnesses last night, found only that the 27-year- old heir of a New York banking family was killed by a pistol "held by a party or parties unknown." A divorced tavern waitress who was with Baker when the jeep was wrecked said she could give no explanation for the bullet wound. Sheriff Frank Stoutamire offered no theories, and no one was being held in connection with the case. The yo'ing amateur aviator died about a. m. Monday on one of the many winding trails of his mother's "Horseshoe where the Duke and Duchess of be raised or especially Windsor were entertained two years on such Items as liquor and tobacco. ago Presentation of the budget message will open the way for committee have paid fines In Justice court taitivity one case at the governor's financial Pine county, are: Game Neumann, New Ulm; Sheridan Greig, Dan- details were available. Further hearings by the house ap- bury: M. M. Meixell, Mankato, committee on public in- Pat Tomlinson, Breckenridge. stitutions can be held. Governor Bureau of Game Youngdahl asked, after these hear- Stephen Sokolik, Walter H. Petra-lings began last week, that the mat- bork and Donald Ledin. jter be held up until after he present- Bureau of Administration em-1 ed his program, Lien, Red Wing, andi Committee hearings on a variety Theodore Fishbach. of soldiers' bonus proposals also have All except Greig, Tomlinson and deferred in the expectation the Ledin, whose cases have pleaded guilty. are New Cold Rolls Into Northwest By The Associated Press Another batch of bad weather moved into storm-harrassed mid- continent today. An area from the eastern Rockies to the Texas Panhandle braced for a new wave of snow, sleet, rain and cold. Near blizzard conditions were fore- cast for the Dakotas, Montana, Ne- jraska and parts of Minnesota. becoming colder with cold wave winds and snow hit the that Foster is a vital defense wit-fat dicated Wednesday night., Low to- night 15: high Wednesday 18. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 22; minimum, 6; noon, 22; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow ness and that the mem- bers of the communist national not be absence. EXTENDED FORECAST Minnesota, Wisconsin. Tempera- tried in hisjtures will average six-eight degrees 'below normal northwestern Minne- sota to near normal southern Wis- consin. Normal maximum 14 north- ern Minnesota to 26 southern Wis- consin. Normal minimum six be- southern Wisconsin. Below normal Man Being Held In Student's Death Tacoma, Wash. A man was held today in connection with the death of pretty Noreen McNicholas.jwill average one to two-tenths inch, nude, frozen body was found I Snow flumes Wednesday, snow under a blanket of moss. again about Saturday. Detective Captain John Kendersi! TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pep. section today and sharp drops in temperatures were predicted for tonight. Lows of 15 to 25 below were forecast for North Dakota and 15 below In South Dakota and Min- nesota. Freezing rain fell today from northeastern Texas and Oklahoma northeastward into southern Indi- ana. Sleet and snow storms were In prospect for most of the north central and southwestern states. Meanwhile, hundreds of motorists field introduced bills to add about 50 was accidental, by himself, or some- miles of Meeker county roads to the I body else. state trunk highway system It was noted that Larkin Badger, Two years ago the senate refused a Negro tenant fanner on the Baker to consider any such bills. It took! plantation, told authorities that he 'heard two shots after hearing the Mexico were picked up by rescue ;rains. They left their cars in the low northern Minnesota to nine nuge drifts but highway crews were busy clearing roads in the path temperatures Wednesday, colder of the heavy fall of snow which r 4- >1D Via If fvt XTOTTT Thursday, warmer Saturday and colder again Sunday. Precipitation refused to disclose the man's namej. or the circumstances surrounding I Chicago 25 his arrest. Byrnes to Get Citizenship Msdal Kansas City James Byrnes, former secretary of state, has been awarded the good citizen- ship medal of the Veterans of For- eign Wars. Denver............ 32 Des Molnes 21 Duluth 19 Intl. Falls 16 Kansas City 24 Los Angeles 59 Mpls.-St. Paul 12 F.I New Orleans 69 New York 54 Seattle 43 Washington 60 Winnipeg 12 17 7 14 2 .01 3 .04 21 36 6 Trace the southern half of New Mexico. Temperatures continued mild In the southeastern states and in most of the eastern states. Cooler weather was forecast for southern Calif- lornia but no severe below freezing readings were expected. 64 36 33 43 4 .63 .04 .02 raising the or more ex- pected to be needed for this purpose. 30 New Bills Nearly 30 new bills were presented at short house and senate sessions late Monday. They included proposals to cut the interest rate and increase the maxi- mum permissible amount of small loans from to to remove present monthly limits on old age and aid to dependent children, in line with the governor's recommendatons; to establish state boards to regulate real estate and accounting businesses; to make the state director of social welfare the coordinator of displaced persons pro- grains; and a resolution asking Con- gress to set up a farm program: which will provide parity prices, tak- ing .present farm costs into consid- eration. Senator J. A. Simonson of Litch- sald waitress Mrs. Thelma Grif- first met Baker Sun- from the American apostolic dele- gation's mission but there .were no casualties. The general opinion here was that the next three days would tell the story of Peiping. (At Tangku, the government eva- cuated troops by small boats and junks. The fleeing Nationals picked up across Taku bar by larger ships which headed south. (Before Nanking, government forces were grouping. Their chance of stopping the overwhelming red forces, which seized Pengpu, aband- oned earlier by the Nationals, was considered slim. (No large scale red movement on the Yangtze valley had been re- Inaugural Timetable 1. Boosting the number of al- lowable on-sale liquor licenses here. A state law for second- class cities now permits 15. 2. A hike in the minimum fund for firemen's and police- men's relief association from to 'and a boost In the maximum allowable pen- sion payable from those funds from to This legisla- tion also affects the second- class cities of Rochester and St. Cloud. 3. A hike in the annual pay for aldermen, council president and mayor. The pay rates, set in 1887, are: Aldermen, council president, and mayor, Proposed: Alder- men council president, and mayor, This legislation would affect Winona alone. 4. Permitting; the Winona municipal court to pay its civil and criminal case jurors a day or portion thereof. Present- ly criminal case jurors get nothing; civil case jurors a day. This legislation would af- fect Winona alone. 5. Transferring Latsch island from the county of Winona to the city of Winona. This would also be special legislation. Copies of the resolution will mailed to Winona County Senator Leonard W. Dernek, City Repre- sentative A. R. Lejk and County Representative J. R. Keller. More On-Sale About liquor licenses The re- solution asking more on-sale for the city is a bi-annual one for the council. The council Is of opinion that in addition to pro- viding additional revenue for city, an Increase in the number of Washington Here's a timetable of major events for Inauguration day Thursday: 7 a. m. Tru- man has breakfast with World War I comrades of Battery D, 129th field artillery (at May- flower Noon The President and Vice President Elect Alben Barkley take oaths of office. Mr. Truman delivers his Inaugural address. 1 p. m. Inaugural parade lasting: two and one-half hours. 5 p. reception at National Art gallery. 10 p. ball at National Guard arrnorv. Congress Moves Into High Gear By William F. Arbogast Washington The 81st Con- gress rolled along In high gear to- day, with two bills already on the President's desk and Mr. Truman's j Censes" would reduce or eliminate first major nomination ready for Senate approval. From here on in, congressional leaders said, it will be work and day night. She testified that Baker fired one pistol shot in an effort to attract the attention of a carl of companions just before he control of the jeep. The car struck an enbankment and she was thrown out and dazed, the young divorcee said. When she recovered consciousness she saw Baker In the middle of the road, and heard him groan. She ran to the highway, met the other car which was her, and reported the accident. They returned to the scene, she said, and Baker died a few minutes later without regaining consciousness. The divorcee testified Baker made no Improper advances and there were no unpleasant incidents during the ride. Young Baker's wife, the former Alicia Gragales of Mexico City, was reported flying to New York for her husband's funeral, which prob- ably will be Wednesday. Baker was a World War n flier, an amateur aviation enthusiast, and an avid hunter. He was the son of the late George F. Baker, who died ten years ago while Ms yacht was rushing him through the South Pacific toward a Honolulu hospital. Sheriff Stoutamlre declared "I will do everything possible to find out how Baker was shot, whether It ported. But communist command- work for the two-week-old ers have some men poised! Congress, except for a short rest for for an attack on the government jthis week's inauguration ceremonies, force of stretched thinly be-) The first two bills to reach Mr. fore Nanking.) Truman hurtled through the House yesterday, having been passed ear- lier by the Senate. One of them will boost the pay of the President, vice-president and speaker of the Soviet Refuses Mediation Bid By Eddy Gilmore Moscow The Soviet gov- ernment announced today it has re- an occurrence such as the string of cases now under way in courts here in which tavernkeeperg charged with a variety of liquor law violations, principally selling li- quor without a dealers are now year for the on-sale Ucenss and for the off and beer licenses. Senator Dernek has informed council that the state liquor con- trol commissioner has agreed to license. paying a House. other gives_ federal to Wmona for a meeting with "the council regarding a boost in. workers in the Washington area a four-day inaugural weekend. Their swift approval by Mr. Tru- man was considered a foregone conclusion. The pay raise bill must become law before Thursday, in- auguration day, to apply to officials whose terms start that day. A third bill affecting the Inaugu- ration also whizzed through the House, but it still needs Senate ap- proval, expected today. It exempts federal taxes the admission tickets being sold for various inau- these deadline mea- sures cleared the Immediate House calendar, leaving only formal ap- proval of Democratic and Republi- can committee assignments for to- the position no new route; should be added until all the presently auth- orized mileage has been improved. Purpose of the move to add routes to the trunk highway, system is to shift maintenance costs from hard- pressed counties to the state. The state senate passed its sec- stranded by heavy snows in New ond bill today and received 11 new Mae West 'Improved' Baltimore Mae West is "very much improved and will the legal per capita, probably be able to get up within a The bill already has passed the proposals. The bill passed was 'a technical one to enable the city of Mankato to complete sale of in air- port bonds. It was introduced by Senator Val Imm of Mankato. The bonds were sold to a Chica- go firm January 4 at an interest rate Senator Tmm described as very favorable. Before taking the bonds, however, the buyer insisted on hav- ing the credit of the city pledged to redemption of the bonds without reference to the city's per capita tax limitation. The bill passed by the senate un- der suspension of the rules removes irat limitation with respect to this bond issue. Senator Imm said the change was only technical since marriage "will break a lot of Mankato now levies only about half ibis social secretary said tjday. Jeep strike an enbankment, and later heard a third shot also. Surviving the young heir are his mother, a brother and two sisters, all of New York. A. J. Peterson Killed in Mishap At DeGraff, Minn. DeGraK, Minn. Arthur J. Peterson of Milan, Minn., was kill- ed last night when highway pa- trolmen siad his car skidded on Icy pavement and hit a tree near here along highway 12. Aly's Marriage To Break Hearts' Aly Khan's any peace government and Chinese commu- The announcement said Russia's negative answer was given late yes- Moscow by Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Vishinsky. The official reason for the refusal was the U.S.S.R.'s declared princi- day. Party members had agreed to ple of noninterference in the in- the assignments in advance. ternal affairs of other nations. the number of on-sale liquor 11' censes, Pension Increase Asked About the relief associations As the law now stands the two sociations, operating separately, may each build funds up to out of which they can pay a maximum monthly pension of to retired firemen or policemen and approxl. mately half that much to the wi- dows of those public employes. The councils of Rochester, St. Cloud and Winona are now asking that minimum fund be Increased to 000 and the maximum allowably pension to a month. Said Council President William P. Theurer, "I have been informed by (Continued on Page 5. Column CITY COUNCIL Northwest Men In Plane Crash few Dr. W. H. Townshend, Jr., her physician, said today. house and now goes to Governor Youngdahl. Aly, son of. wealthy Aga Khan, an- nounced yesterday he will marry Actress Rita Hayworth when he has divorced his English wife. Charles Blankemeir of Meadeville, Pa., helps his wife bake a cake yesterday, shortly before the couple left for Washington to witness President Truman's inaugural. Blankemeir was cook for Battery D, 129th Field Artillery, 35th Division, In World War I. President Tru- man commanded the. battery. (AF. Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald.) t Salina, Kan. The Smoky Hill Air Force base today announc- ed the names of 20 men killed in an American B-29 Superfortress crash in Scotland. The, plane crashed yesterday near I Lochgoilhead, Scotland. Search, crews reported they found no sur- vivors. The bomber, which was attached to the 301st bomb group stationed at Scampton Field, Lincolnshire, was on the way home to Salina after three months temporary duty in England. Colonel Joe Kelly, 301st wing: com- mander at Smoky Hill, listed thoss aboard the plane when it took off at Scampton as including: Private First Class Robert W. Brown, Jr., whose father lives at Sheboygan, Wis, Private First Class Bruce J. Krum- holz, whose father lives at Granada, Minn., route two. Sergeant Anthony V. Chrisldls, whose father lives at 3425 42nd ave- nue, south, Minneapolis, Minn.' Pine City Youth Wins Swine Project St. Raymond Zastera, 20, Pine City, last night was named grand champion in the 4-H club 1948 ton litter swine project after bringing 12 Chester whites to a 762-pound weight total in 180 days of feeding.- The pigs made average daily gains of one and one-half pouadi after they   

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