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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, November 30, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 30, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                              VOLUME 48, NO. 242 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES Big Four Study New Berlin Plan Republican-Herald photo "I Think It's a good opportunity to get an says Recruit Joan S. Gatz, Stockton, as she is congratulated on her enlistment in the WAC (Women's Army Corps) by Sergeant Mary Barankie- wlcz, WAC recruiter In the Winona Army and Air Force recruiting station. Nineteen years old, Joan is the first local 'original enlistee in the WAC since the end of World War H, and the first to enlist since the WAC became part of the regular Army. She enlisted for two years, and left Monday morning for Camp Va., where she will receive her basic training. Her starting pay is a month, plus food, clothing, housing and medical service. The WAC and WAP (the Air Force women's branch) accept only single women, but they may be married after. enlisting and still remain to the service. Recruiter Baranklewlcz, 562 East Fourth street, is In the Air Force branch and came on recruiting duty here yes- terday. She has enlisted for three years, and during World War n also saw three years of service. Six War Criminals Win 11th Hour Respite By Russell Brines Premier Hldekl Tojo -and six other top Japanese warmakers won an llth. hour respite today from the hangman's noose. General Douglas MacArthur said they would "certainly not" be executed until the Supreme Court of the United States has acted on appeals by two of the condemned men. Cold Follows Rain Through Southern Area Chicago Colder weather moved into the flooded areas of the southland today, addin further dis- comfort to the many made home- less by rain-flooded rivers. Skies were mostly clear over the flood regions of Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee but temperatures in parts of those and other southern states dropped. Readings in the 30's were reported in parts of .Ala- bama, Georgia and Tennessee, while Vicksburg, Miss., had a low of 28 today. No heavy rain was forecast in the South as river flood crests moved downstream, carrying the threat to middle and southern portions of Georgia to southern Alabama. Flood waters poured over thousands of acres of lowland in South Caro- lina. Across the country, generally, lair and colder weather prevailed today. The mercury dipped to near the zero mark in some parts of the country's coldest belt, which ex- tended from the Rockies over the north central region. Low marks included three above Mont., and Eagle, Colo, some light snow in northern Min- nesota. A power shortage Georgia due to the and mechanical failures. In Ma- The next scheduled meeting of the Supreme court Is December 6. (If the Supreme court rejects the appeal next Monday, as it did a sim- ilar petition by German war crimi- nals, Japan's warmakers could be hanged December 7 on the seventh anniversary of Pearl Harbor.) Press Query The appeals from the internation- al military tribunal's verdict were Chinese Red Troops Trap Chiang Force Near Showdown For Approach To Nanking Bulletin Nankin; Usually re- liable sources said today Chinese government troops have befrun the abandonment of Suchaw. By Harold K. Milks Nanking A Chinese com- munist maneuver which has trap- ped nearly national troops xxlay threatened a showdown for command of the road to Nanking. Shortly after Chinese press dis- patches reported the entire 12th army was trapped, the 0. S. em- bassy announced Naval plans will ;tart Thursday evacuating 100 Am- erican dependents of embassy and consular attaches from central :hina. They .will be flown to Manila rom Nanking and Shanghai. The embassy said this was in line with I ts previous warnings to Americans! in central China "to move to areas! f greater safety." 1 Chiang Kai-sheL's 12th army was j eported hemmed in by the reds! >nly 145 miles northwest of Nan-) king, the national capital, and 67 miles south of Suchow, which has Deen the key to the central China Prowlers' Attempt to Break Into State Theater Safe Fails Prowlers who staged an amateur- ter located across the street from ish attempt to break into a safe at the State, and Rofuth summoned the State theater, 170 Johnson police to Investigate the incident, street, some time last night, tookj Police investigation disclosed that ment and used these to break off the combination of a safe housed in an office adjacent to the first floor lobby. The safe door' was not nothing of value, an examination of (the prowlers apparently entered the opened, however, the theater revealed this morning. basement of the theater through The tools were left near the safe The unsuccessful safe-cracking street opening used by a door leading to the projec- was discovered by E. W. Martinson, workers who are remodeling a base- j tion room was damaged in an un- 261 West Mark street, a theater em-1 ment lounge in the building. ploye, when he arrived at the thea- ter at about 8 a. m., today. He notified J. C. Rofuth, 562 West Once inside the structure, the prowlers picked up a sledge ham- mer, wrecking bar and screw driver King, manager of the Winona thea-' from a supply of tools in the base- successful attempt to enter that room. The police investigation is being directed by Detective George R. Meyers. Soviets Accept Latest Scheme ByBramuglia Reds Appoint City Government For All Berlin Attempted Break Thwarted Tobin Wants At La Crosse County JaiI Qf Anti-Labor State Rulings La Crosse, Wis An attempted jailbreak was thwarted here last night because the prisoners made too much noise while trying to gouge a hole in an outer wall. Sheriff Vern Lamp said the jailer, Carl Schnick, heard a scratching and tapping emanating from a third floor cell block. Schnick notified the sheriff and the four' persons in the cell block! were moved to the second floor. battle front. Orders have gone out to the garrison at Snchow to march to the rescue. So far it has shown no disposition to do so. It may prefer to stay where tt is, with strong fixed defenses, plenty of food and inanitions. Beyond the encircled 12th army there is little to halt the red drive concentrate on lower-cost homes, !on a charge of contributing to the Senator McCarthy (B.-Wls.) of a minor; Willard Color Marks Met Opening Verdi's Otello Begins Season By Cynthia New York crowd turn- ed out at the 66-year-old Metro- politan Opera House last night to i Guam aboard the Navy transport! of basic materials, elimination ofj Lower-Cost Home Building Need Stressed must it to cut a hole two feet In diameter in the brick and The wall By Arthur Gavshon new plan for media- tion of the Berlin crisis, devised by a man who wouldn't give up, ap- pears assured by a Big Four trial. Juan A. Bramuglla, Argentine for- eign minister and retiring presi- dent of the United Nations security council, is the author. The plan calls for a neutral com- mission of experts to handle the technical and procedural phases of the East-West conflict over dual currency and the Russian land blockade. Government Picked The United States, Britain, France -r----- and Russia would assign their own 0 j ministration drive against a "tide of representatives to stand by In Paris By Harold W. Ward Washington Secretary of The sheriff discovered that Tobin today opened an ad- consists of three layers of brick and the prisoners had one more layer to go when they were discov- ered. They had planned to tie sev- eral blankets together and drop to a driveway, according to the sheriff. Lamp said he had placed three men in solitary confinement as a result of the attempted jailbreak. They were Melvin Shaffer, 20, of antilabor legislation in the states. He told delegates to the 15th an- nual conference of state labor com- missioners that some state laws are "worse than and he urged them to unite in a campaign for "sound labor standards." While Tobin was opening the three-day session his aides were busy drafting a substitute measure for the 1947 federal labor law President today, "if the housing shortage is I going to be licked." He told a reporter he agrees with Housing Administrator Raymond M. Foley that the real need is for low- cost homes. "Prices of good, substantial homes can come down if there is concen- tration by the builders on construc- tion of lower-priced if labor and material prices stay rela- tively McCarthy said. short of Yangtze river bank pposlte Nanking. _ ___ (A detachment of U. S.ican'b'e'curby'buiiders to get costs Corner Cutting "There are a lot of corners that Marines arrived at Tsingtao from somewhat in line. Standardization Johnson, 20, and Leonard Schleifer, 17, each serving one year for larceny of pigs. The sheriff said all would be charged with attempted jail- break and destruction of county property. He estimated damages at Sheriff Lamp said a 14-year-old boy who was to be taken to the Wisconsin school for boys at Wau- kesha today also was quartered in the third floor cell block. No action was contemplated against the youth, Gains Scored The secretary said in his prepared for 30 days to give whatever aid the expert commission might require. The plan appears Intended to sava face for all. (These developments were brought to light as the communists set up a hand-picked puppet government for Berlin today, completing the city's East-West division. The So- viet Union now Is in the position, of making a gesture in Paris to- ward settling the Berlin crisis while sponsoring actions In Berlin which could make any agreement reached address that the state labor groups paris impossible of achievement.) had scored most gains in the four! Bramuglla had been seeking, and years after the first such to bri.ig the Big Four to- here in 1933. But since then, ever since the security coun- said, "the drive for sound labor leg-jdl voted October 5 to air the charge hear opera and, perhaps, to observe a gala tradition. They they saw. A couple of hundred others attend- ed the opening of the New York opera season, too. They came to be seen and it scarcely seemed worth all the effort. The new season marked an 1m- jortant milestone in music, too, for filed in Washington yesterday in be- television carried the annual pageant half of former Premier Koki Hirota, who helped plot Japan's pre-Pearl Harbor war plans, and General Ken- Jl Polhara, known to the Chinese as the "bird of evil omen." The Associated Press asked the supreme allied command whether General MacArthur would "recog- nize the appeal and order the exe- cution of these two men delayed or whether he will ignore the appeal." This brought the following state- ment from MacArthur's public in- formation office: "In reply to a query from the press as to whether the con- demned Japanese war criminals would be executed before action could be taken on appeal to the Supreme court of the United States, General MacArthur cate- gorically replied, 'Certainly not'." Later the public information of- 3ce said this applied to all seven major war makers, although only two appealed. Death Watch Despite the delay, MacArthur's to a living room and bar-and-grill audience estimated at most of whom had never Bayfleld. It brought the leatherneck strength there to (Tsingtao, headquarters of U. S Naval forces In the western Pacific, in on the Shantung peninsula, where Chinese communists already hold nearby points. They have made no effort to take the city. (The United States previously an- nounced it was bolstering the Ma- rine force at Tsingtao to "assist in the American civilian evacua- tion and protect American property" during sub-contractors' profits in some cases, and such are examples of what can be done." McCarthy said the 1948 housing act is working out well, although in need of some technical amendments as well as a revision that would per- mit lending agencies to grant more liberal loans, Although the public housing feat- ure was knocked out of the 1948 act, McCarthy said he would support such a measure in the new Congress "if'they will broaden the base to permit those most in need of such the color-fllled stage from a house seat. Exited Audience (There stfll is no indication when! housing to get it." the northern communist armies wil clash with the main froces of It was a highly jeweled and excit- General Fu Tso-Yl, commander ol ed audience which flocked to nationalist armies in north Verdi's a somber tale of i China. The communists forces east of Peiplng, 400 miles north of Su- chow, chosfi to withdraw rather than fight. This suggested their move- ments have been a feint. (The longer the northern commu- nists armies wait before attacking the better it suits Fu. He has begun receiving American arms, and fur- ther shipments are due.) WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and murder and suicide. Some veteran opera-goers said the choice of the heavier opera was discourage between- the-acts bar shenanigans which had stolen headlines in past years. Ear- lier Director Edward Johnson had appealed to the press to ignore publicity-seeking exhibitions. Whatever the reason, it was an opening almost totally without in- cident, other than the arrival of celebrities in the glare of television floodlights and the flash of pho- tographers' bulbs. First night peo- ple stage and opera and colder tonight; low 16 in the 12 m rural. areas- Wednesday climax increasing cloudiness and warmer in the afternoon, followed by light snow Wednesday night. High Wed- shortly But the started to arrive 8 p. m. was reached for when Miss Margaret Truman made the bystanders at Butte, press officers announced they would appearance ten or 15 minutes There was'continue their 24-hour death watch, [after the opera had started. con, the swollen Ocmulgee river disrupted operation of five of the city's ten pumping station filters and industries were ordered to halt using water. The Ocmulgee reach- ed a record 28 feet and many fam- ilies were evacuated. A state-wide appeal was made by the Georgia Power Company for its Presumably the watch would be to handle news of suicide attempts, or developed in similar developments. flood waters The Japanese continued to pre- pare for the death of the seven Tojo and the six others all took the same Buddhist name to identify their spirits in the after world. users tion. to curtail electric consump- Gasoline buses were substl- Roughly translated the name means "eternal life." Usually names for the after world are assigned by a Buddhist priest after death. But their death seems so certain they chose their own. De- fense Attorney Ichiro Kiyose ex- plained that because of their prom- tuted for electric-powered trackless inence they were privileged to adopt trolleys in Atlanta. I deceased names of the highest class. ARMY SLASHES JANUARY DRAFT CALL TO Washington The Army today cut in half its proposed January draft call for men. Lack of money was given as the reason. At the same time, the Army announced the February call _ would be for only men. "The Teductlons were neces- sitated by the limitation of the military budget for fiscal 1950 to S15.000.000.000 of which 000.000 nre for stock-piling of strategic raw the na- tional military establishment said in a statement announcing the Army plans. The new draft calls are far below the a month aver- age which Army Secretary Roy- all estimated last June when plans were being made for the peacetime draft. The first call for November was and the December call The announcement said that neither the Navy nor Air Force has requested any inductions under the selective service act. Crowd Cheers She was smiling and pretty in a full, draped dress of white silk whose modest decollete was broken by an oversize a stole white fox. Her hostess was Miss Jane Watson, young daughter of Thomas J. Watson, wealthy New York industrialist. The crowd cheered and applaud- ed as the President's daughter en- tered. After posing briefly for photographs. Miss Truman and her party went on to the Watson box. The party did not enter the big, gaudy opera house bar between the acts, but went to the exclusive rooms of the Opera club, closed to press and all but a handful of box- holders and guests. Dowager Arrives The late arrival' of the dowager Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt really was the signal, however, that another season of opera had started. And, as usual, Mrs. George Washington Kavanaugh arrived wearing a fan- tastic amount of jewelry, from emerald-and-diamond tiara, to an armload of bracelets and four fingers fun of enormous single- stoned rings. Mrs. Betty Henderson, elderly stormy petrel who. last year enliv- ened bar proceedings by being pho- tographed with her leg on a table, was greeted wildly. She had a fantastic headdress which included Mme. Pompadour curls, but con- ducted herself with considerable decorum during her three-act occu- pancy of a table In the bar, nesday 39. LOCAE WEATHER Official observations for Biggest Need He said the public housing section that failed to get past the House this would have permit- ted construction of units in each of five not take ac- count "of those most in need." "In my the Wiscon- sin senator continued, "housing need should be the. sole deter- mining factor as to which ten- ants will use public even though this will cost the government more. "When it was before Congress in Two to Face Gambling Count At Lake City Lake City, Minn. Two men will appear in municipal court to- morrow in connection with a short- lived gambling club, complete with peep hole and membership cards. Islation has slowed to a walk.' he said, "a counter- trend has developed, of attacks on the rights of organized work- ers, of diffusion of labor func- tions various agencies of the federal and state govern- ments, of successful attempts to weaken the federal and state la- bor departments through cuts In funds or withholding of increas- ed appropriations. "The energies of labor officials and organized labor have necessarily been diverted to defending their gains rather than to pursuing new ;oals. You have literally been fighting with your backs walls." Minimum of the United States, Britain and France that the Russian blockade was a threat to peace, Bramuglia announced Russia agreed to his new plan last night and that he expected formal ac- ceptance from the United States, Britain and France today." They have already accepted in principle. An American source said the for- mula was being referred to Wash- ington and that the western powers may reach a decision some time during the day or early tomorrow. Officiate Dubious Officials In the U. S, delegation {kg said It was difficult, In the light of 'developments in Berlin, to hold much hope of a final agreement "The fear of he said, "ranks right behind the atomic bomb in the minds of the American jeople." He proposed also that the state with the Soviets. They took gloomy view of the outlook. A delegation spokesman was asked about the belief expressed yester- day by Senator Connally officials strive to boost the minimum! incoming chairman of the Senate wage from 40 cents to 75 cents affairs committee, that the hour, and to write fair labor stan-j blockade would be raised soon, dards acts where there are no pres- "We hope he's the spokes- ent.wage laws. told reporters, He urged the state representatives! Bramuglla Is winding up Berlin, and John Mallouf, who gave their addresses as St. Paul. They posted bail of each. He said they were charged with gambling. Sheriff John Jacobs of Wabasha county and William Bennyhoff, crime bureau agent, raided the "Lake Social in the base- ment of a night club, Saturday night. The establishment had op- the last session, it was based on the erated only 40 minutes, from 10 p. theory of the 'stable wage earner.' jm. to hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 41; mmimiim, 23; HOOn 26; precipitation, trace; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at EXTENDED FORECASTS Minnesota, Wisconsin: Tempera- tures will average about five de- grees abovi; normal- Normal maxi- mum 24 nurth tor 40 south. Normal nimum seven north to 23 south. Warmer Wednesday, colder Thurs- day, warmer Friday and colder again about Sunday. Precipitation during period generally light, most- ly one-tenth inch or less. Little or no precipitation south portion and light snows north portion occurring Wednesday and again Friday or Saturday. Additional weather on page 16. This is too rigid and will not help those most in need of public housing, Slum Clearance "We will never clear out slum areas if we say that only stable wage earners can use public housing. It will cost the government more be- cause some people with small in- comes would be able to pay very lit- tle as rent." McCarthy said income alone should not be the determining factor the 24 in deciding "need" in selecting ten- LEFT ants for public housing. "For he said, ried couple with income .of would not be in as great need of housing as a man making but who has a sick wife dren." seven chil- fe to bUUd Herring Runs Near Record In Wisconsin By The Associated Press Near-record herring runs are In progress off Wisconsin's borders in Attorney Arnold Hatfield.iLakes superjor and Michigan. Unbelievingly, Hatfielti said, At Bayfleld, Wis., fishermen re- told the sheriff who with Benny- ported that every schooner in' the eight The raid followed a tip_ given new media- tion effort can get under way Im- mediately. He steps down as presi- dent of the security council at mid- night. Kis successor is Fernand Van Lagenhove of Belgium, December president of the council. Through Bramuglia's olive branch campaign, technical problems; would be cleared away and the quarrel would be reduced largely to political differences. Fear Elections On the Berlin front the commu- hoff gained entrance to the club after getting the once-over through a traditional peep hole. In three connecting rooms, Hat- field said, they found Sharkey op- erating a dice table and Mallouf a roulette game. There was also a blackjack table, not in operation. Between eight and ten patrons were on hand. The equipment was confiscated, along with a few membership cards which apparently were to be issued. The patrons were hustled out with- out cashing in their chips. Bayfleld and Cornucopia areas has been put into service as the herring are running near shore on the heels of last week's storm. At Menomlnee, Mich., Fred Klaus, manager of the Dormer Fish Com- pany, said the run in Green Bay waters was so heavy that his com- pany has been unable to salt and pack or freeze all of the catch brought to it. He said at least 12 tugs have been ijringlng daily two-ton loads to the plant and the run is expected to last two weeks. Cinderella Generals Boss Sergeants Army Throws Party for Draftees BUY CHRISTMAS SEALS Denver Colorado's first postwar draftees pinched them- selves and wondered if this is the Army. The Army threw them a swank party last night. It made them dnderella generals. Tough old ser- geants jumped at their commands, The brass looked on and smiled. There were dates and bands and songs and comedy. And there was food that never graced a wartime chow line. When it was all. over, they went back to warm hotel rooms instead of cold tents of wartime induction centers. But today, they head for Fort Ord, Calif., and the realities of basic training. Fart of Plan The party was all a part of the Army plan to prove there's a new lock in soldiering. But it still was by the numbers. The 22-page script for the affair was big enough to swallow a D-day field order. As one Inductee put it, "We weren't exactly invited. We weren't exactly ordered. They told us very nicely that we had to go. It all part of the things we had to do the day we were inducted." There was a little of the old hurry-up-and-wait. The group was told to be on hand at 7 p. m. The party got under way 35 minutes later. A sergeant lined them up and paired them off with their dates, USO and YWCA hostesses in for- mal gowns. Sixty-one men were slated for induction but six were turned down at the last moment. Nobody remembered to tell the girls so there were six spares. The "couples marched in. The "Grand March" program called it a "grand march a slow stately re arch to left, of dignitary guests table down center aisle in a column of twos up to the stage and from there to their designated tables." The men pinned corsages, also courtesy of -the Army, on their dates. The girls pinned stars on the men and gave them printed commisulons as general for of a popular election, called a meet- ing of carefully selected leaders. This meeting by a show of hands elected a mayor and a magistral (executive administration) claiming jurisdiction over the whole city. The communist move in the Soviet sector made It virtually Impossible for any agreement on currency to be carried out. The .currency dis- pute is a key to the Berlin crisis. The communists named Frledrlch Ebert, namesake son of the first Weimar republic president, as "may- or" of all Berlin. Ebert promptly declared that the elections set for Sunday in the western sectors were null and void. The communists have refused to take part in the regularly sched- uled elections for all Berlin remem- bering their defeat in 1946, and have ordered their followers to boycott the voting in the western sectors. Huge Demonstration After the meeting proclaimed a new city government, the demon- stration spilled out into the Soviet sector of the city. Some per- sons from factories and stores which were shut down marched along Unter Den Linden, where Hitler's troops once paraded. The regularly elected antlcommu- night. While 30 sergeants sat on the dance floor and ate G rations, ho- tel waiters prime ribs, served rissolle orange juice, peas, salad, rolls and butter, ice cream, cake and coffee. There was a floor show. Then there was dancing. At midnight, the band gave out with a roll of the drums and 12 city government, driven from jcity hall In the Soviet sector by 'communist demonstrators, has been sitting in western Berlin. Ferdinand Friedensburg, a Chris- tian Democrat who is the acting mayor of the elected anticommunist government, said of the communist meeting: "That was no election, but a pri- vate action by Irresponsible ele- ments. I have no intention of giv- party was over. The girls went men up, shouted "forward march" and them bade to rooms. loud bangs with the cymbals. The ing up my office, as doing so would be a violation of my constitutional acme. Two sergeants lined the oath. These men (the communists) are making themselves guilty of 11- their legally assuming offices and should be tried under the penal code."   

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