Winona Republican Herald, June 26, 1948

Winona Republican Herald

June 26, 1948

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Issue date: Saturday, June 26, 1948

Pages available: 12

Previous edition: Friday, June 25, 1948

Next edition: Monday, June 28, 1948

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Publication name: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Pages available: 38,914

Years available: 1947 - 1954

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All text in the Winona Republican Herald June 26, 1948, Page 1.

Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 26, 1948, Winona, Minnesota w EATHER Cloudy tonlrht Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 48, NO. 111 MINNESOTA. SATURDAY EVENING, JUNE 26, 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWELVE PAGES Windstorm, Hail Batter Crops in Area "Root River ___rf-1 fa liSP feS V sffe F--5-5B 53 Badly Danrneccf Com, stripped by" hail and whipped by rain and strong winds, stands today on the Ole Klslovo farm, near Rushford. Mr. Rlslove. hoped it would grow again. Russia Keeps Clamps on Berlin Zone By James Devlin Russians' land j blockade of Berlin continued to- day and Britain accused the Soviet union of trying ruthlessly to create stnte of slogo. With the western powers in con- sultation over tholr next step, the British foreign office .mid the Soviet campaign, "by starving tho helpless civilian population" of Berlin, seeks to cnln political advantage ivt. the expense of tho west. The .state- ment added: "Wo intend stay in Berlin. THI3 Wicked up an earlier state- ment by General Lucius D, U. S. military governor, that no tlon short of war could drive the Americans from Berlin. Tho Berlin blockade coincides with tho western powers' currency reform, and efforts by Russia and the western powers to put tncir own brands of currency in clrcula- T? S, Ambassador Lewis W. Douglas called on Foreign Secre- tary Ernest Bevln in London for consultations on the tense sltua- An official American spokesman military headquarters here said there has been no word from any source of Russian plans to lift their land embargo against smp- U 's. authorities started flying drugs into tho city to fight the jnucrzc, which took the form ot a rail freight blockade and a cessa- tion of food and brown coal sup- plies from tho surrounding Russian Th'o Americans also announced plans to fly In powdered and con- densed milk for German babies. Supplies of fresh milk have been shut off with other food supplies for some Berllncrs in the city's western sectors. A barge was reported to have arrived from western Germany with grain and Hour today, but there was no sign of a letup of the land embargo. Air Force Active The American Air Force already was running a shuttle service to Stassen Still Top Man With State Delegation By Adolph Johnson Philadelphia. Harold Stas- sen Is still top man with his Minne- sota supporters, "We arc disappointed that we lost, wus vutnmiK nf him and the itiuply Berlin's 10.000 or so Amerl- but we arc proud ot mm ana ciins The announcement said noth- clonn campaign he conducted, they ing about flying In food for west- before It-twins for home after cm Berlin's some Oermans_. convention. the people yesterday they "will not ho them not to we bo permitted to be deprived of bchiur the vlce-p food." Ho said, "the stupid and nominntion. brutal threat to starve Berlin Is stassen told Governor 1 just foolish." Dcwey before the New JU..- Tho military nnunerment Berlin economically dependent on c the Soviet area of control by re- Sv5s KT swss. Strength Of The Wind is Indicated by this photo showing how it bent over the windmill on the Rislove farm. .____________ Dewey and Warren Tie Campaign to Work of Congress By Jack Bell The east-west twain of Thomas E, Dewey and Earl Warren cut the pattern today for a G.O.P. presidential ed to a congressional record neither helped write. Governor Dewey, kingpin of the first White House o drive the Republicans think they arc sure oi winning in 16 years, had a few cleanup decisions to mate. Then he planned to head for a weekend rest at his Pawling. N. Y., farm. California's Governor Warren stuck around to talk things over be- fore lighting out for a look at some of New York's latest stage shows.1 This excursion had been planned long before Warren had any idea the vice-presidential lightning would strike him at yesterday's closing session- of the Republican national convention. At The Odin Grinde farm, one mile east of Peterson, the wall of a barn top was demolished. _______ Andresen Ready Gates to U.S. Opened To Release Report lln TTnitjirl St.ft.1 .I.VL-UHUII. House report Representative Clarence J. Brown on commodity speculation by gov- of Ohio said today that officials will be released live Hugh D. Scott, Jr., of Pennsyl- vania has been designated as chair- man the Republican national committee. The election of Scott, who repre- sents ix Philadelphia congressional next week. Representative August H. Andre- sen chairman of a spe- Dcwey DClors: utis ----1 v, ;ary covcrnment an- running mate was picked that he nounccment said the Soviet aim Is woulcl not lee his name be placed "to nwkc the western sectors of ln Domination, but would accept u n on Kir ouviui. -j J.UUHKH delegates ..TO. strlcting shipments of goods be- stntcs pl.0mlsed backing, the Mlnnc- i'ecn Berlin and western Ger- sota respected Stassen s wisn- ,any." "This makns It said V J_ W V-'W------------------ the stfttomrnt, "for the western ccpoon he sot Thursday night at iilllcs to alleviate thn plight of Ber-jConvcrltion hall when he Joined the lln manufacturers rngnged In pro-'move to make the Dewcy nomina.- crltlctil products for the Uon unnnimous proved his popular- western zones and getting critical Items from the West." The coal embargo threatened to csuise the slosv breakdown of light and Kas service In western Berlin. Electricity from the Soviet area, supplying halt western Ber- lin's normal needs, has been turned oft and on from time to time since midweek. Lifting of Blockade Asked by British Berlin The British com- maiulcr in Germany, General Sir H not to iu acuuo u Vnr the vice-presidential j district, was to be ratified formally 101 tnc 'by the committee at a reorganiza- tion meeting later today. Brown announced Scott's selection after a breakfast meeting of the national committee members at the campaign headquarters of Governor Thomas E. Dowey, G.O.P. presi- dential nominee. Warren Consulted A series of conferences between Dewny and Republican leaders last night preceded the choice of Scott to succeed Carroll Reece of Tennes- see as head of the committee. Governor Warren conferred with Dcwey for several hours late last continue to night on the selection, voice in the Republican Scott's designation indicated n voice i victory for the Pennsylvan hU surmort to both headed by Senator Edward __. _._.. his support i TO Un nnd former Scnntor Joseph Gruncly. wu adciecj that if the congress wert; clal seven-man investigating com-jStm in session I would return this mittee, told a reporter today thatlbijj without my approval and urge _ ___ i.i_ _ i, n li-rtv mrtrn VtlllVinnO til 11 bfi cs and did nothing. They felt that the tremendous re- Ity party, He Dcwoy and Warren and to othei candidates of the Republican party. He said he would continue his drive for n. liberal program within the party "especially in the interests oi young people." Stassen said Ire would talk about his future plans after ho gets back to Minnesota. He said he would stay in the East for two-or three days before going back. He told reporters yesterday thit forces expcct even u. minor post It Dcwey is elected. Brian Robertson, demanded todayi JIL- LUH.I j> that tho Russians lift their landluc doesn't expect "to participate ac- blockudc of t raffle to Berlin. Other- In the new administration. wise, ho snlcl, tho Russians must His remark indicated he does no.. take tho bluino for Oermtin suSer- Ing. Robertson sent n. letter to his Soviet counterpart, Marshal Vasslly D. Sokolovsky, saying: "The Interruption of essential 1 iright cunnot be held to be a mens- uro necessary to protect the curren- cy position oi the Soviet zone." Woman Electrocuted YounRstown, Har- old E. Wiseman was taking a bath yesterday when a radio fell from the edge' ot the tub Into the water, electrocuting her, firemen reported. :es gates to the United States were thrown open today to European refugees who can meet conditions labeled "flagrantly discriminatory" toy President Truman. eled "flagrantly discriminatory" toy President Truman. Thcy are to In signing the refugee immigration bill into Jaw yesterday, Mr. poned w the maximum extent per- fired a stronclv-phrased blast at Congress for mjttcd by available supplies. Our nrcu -ij. u b j contemplates a, striking: force not sending him a better measure. added that "if the Congress were "the first report will show examples of how government officials and em- ployes'on the inside speculated In commodities. "Nntr.es of these people will be withhold at this time, but names will be named in the final report to be issued late in the fall." Andresen said the committee will hold public hearings in August and September, covering the entire field of commodity dealings by both pri- vnto traders and government offi- cials. The Minnesotan said nonresident that a fairer, more humane bill be passed." The measure discriminates against Jewish and Catholic displaced per- sons, the President charged, by set- ting up immigration conditions which most such refugees cannot meet. "It is a close the Presi- dent's bitterly-worded statement said, "whether this bill is better or worse than no bill at all." The now law limits immigration over the next two years to those DP's who fled to Germany, Austria and Italy between September 1. 1039 and December 22, 1345. "By this device.'' Striking Force Of 16 Divisions Planned by Army Norfolk, Va, Secretary o the Army Kenneth C. Royall said today a mobile striking force, of I" Infantry and armored divisions 1 planned for the Army by 1949. Royall said the six of which would be National Guard di- visions, would tre fully manned and equipped. The cabinet member revealed the Army's plans in the commencement address of the armed forces staff college here. Royall said the National Guard divisions -would include the 26th in Massachusetts. The 28th in Pennsylvania, Ver- mont and Rhode Island, the 45th in Oklahoma and the 49th armored in Texas. "We have been forced by circum- stances by bitter actualiti-cs to spend a substantial part of our na- tional effort on the expansion oi our armed Secretary Royall declared. "We had no alternative other than to take a dangerous chance as to the survival of our nation, its form of government and its way of life. "It is- our duty to see that the money and above all the men which America has entrusted to our care are not wasted." He continued: "By the end of 1949 we expected to have n. mobile striking force of 12 complete regular army divisions and six National Guard divisions with the organized reserve supplying necessary service support units for Valley Farms Hit Hardest Miniature Cyclone Damages Fields In Narrow Strip By Staff Writer Rushford, swift, power- ul wind roared across the Rush- ord-Petcrson-Houston area late Friday afternoon, flattened barns. Lore roofs off buildings and battered :rops. The wind slammed rain and large hailstones into the crops, and to solatcd areas fanners today were viewing the stripped fields. The narrow storm was of a cyclonic ;o be the tailcnd of the storm, that lit hardest In portions of Martin, Blue Earth, Dodge and Olmsted counties. Byron apparently was the cen- ter of the storm. There crops in a. strip 17 mile? long and three miles wide were virtually flattened. Heavy Hail Damage The path Irom there to Fillmore and Houston counties was a little obscure, but heavy hail estimated at 50 per cent by one reported in the vi- cinity of the Elmira church Jive miles north of Chatfleld. Since the miniature cyclone out of the northwest, the Petcrson- Rushford Houston damage may lave been caused by the tall of the storm. At Houston, farms to the south of the village hit, and observers said that it appeared to lave turned south there. Sheldon reported some hall, but Caledonia a few miles to the south reported a heavy rain but no hail. Apparently the teeth of the stona severe wind and ed about there. Heavy Rains Nearly every point In Southeast- ern Minnesota, however, reported heavy rains following almost two weeks of intermittent precipitation, although In the Harmony axea no rain fell yesterday afternoon. In the area, the wind strongest between Rushford and Peterson, Juet -west of Rushford tralned are to as prompUy as possible eQUippcd and wea- in the case of emergency, force will be the nucleus of the neu per cent of the remaining Jewish army_ displaced persons are definitely ex- second infantry division ai And, he said, it "also many displaced persons of the Cn.th- olic faith" who "f.ed into the Ameri- can zones after December 22, 1945, in order to escape persecution in countries dominated by a communist form of government." The President said he hopes the next session of Congress will remedy the bill's the De- cember 1945 deadline. Ft. Lewis, Wash., Deludesiarmored division at Second Camp Hood [armored division ac uamp .nuga, Texas, each of them now at about one-third strength, nnd the Third infantry division at Fort Benning Ga., now just av headquarters al' of these will be brought to ful strength. A grand new infantry divi- sion, the Eighth, will be at Camp Campbell, Ky, Another airborne di- vision will also be organized. Its sta- tion, has not yet treen determined." ijprprriDpr z.? aliens made a profit during 1946 Truman "More than and 1947 or at least on Mr- speculative trading In the exchanges but paid no income taxes on tha: 90 money. "We are now working with., the The-Martin-Grundy group pulled fmm t.hn. nnti-Dewev Qf tax the cnairman in. the week by drawing Martin as a favorite son candidate for the presidential nomi- nation and throwing their support to the New York governor. Among the others considered for the chairmanship were Harry Dar- by, Kansas City, Kan., and Herbert Brownell, Jr., of New York, Dewey's campaign manager. It was decided not to give the chairmanship to New York, but Brownell probably will direct Dewey's campaign. There were indications, however, that Dewey would turn over the ac- tual campaign management job to special director of his own. Re- cast in this role Herbert E, :11, who spearheaded the Sue- nomination drive. Russian Newspapers Attack G.O.P. Ticket Moscow Morning newspa- pers gave readers their pictures to- day oi Reublican nominees for the Elevator Man Charged With Swindle New York A described as a man whose can- week elevator starter, who a witness didacy "answers the demands or cir- sald had "such a beautiful way of'clcs representing large capital and ____t-i.-j i__i. Kn-r.nllCfl tWO- Wisconsin Woman Charged With Possession of Smuggled Diamonds Fond du Lac, year-old mother of two children was charged today with possession of smuggled property described by shop were seized by the sheriff. Walker said Mrs. Sommerfeldt La Crosse 12 stated she got the gems from her Tributary S brother, Fred Stelter, whom, she vis- Chippcwn. at Durand ited in Holland from March to .Tun United States. Thomas E. Dewey, for president, was "to be "a strong opponent of Roosevelt's New Deal and always spoke out against progressive leg- islation." Earl Warren, for vice-president. Joseph A. Walker as about last year. Buffalo above Alma oosepn w converted his belong- Trempealcau at Dodge pr. niflmonds. ._...... ._ LU lilltlCl. Mrs. HildegardO Sommerfeldt of Ripon was accused in a federal war- rant issued at Milwaukee yesterday by U. S. Court Commissioner Floyd E. Jenkins. was convicted last nignt of squandering some his friends gavo him to invest. The gray-haired defendant, Gus Fusaro. 54, was found guilty by a Jury on five counts of grand larceny and bucket shop operations. who supports "the so-called two- party policy" embracing the Mar- shall plan and Truman doctrine. Dewcy's campaign was pictured "supported by rich New York in- John Foster Lake Green federal walker of county said he and a. arrested Mrs. Sommerfeldt yesterday while she was at work In a Ripon bakery. Mrs. Sommerfeldt had left about ten diamonds at a beauty shop when she was arrested, the sheriH said. Hi; said she told him she had of the jewels in a safety The gems at the beauty missloner at Milwaukee. ings into diamonds prior to the Ger- Black at Ncillsville man occupation, the sheriff quoted Black at Galcsvlllc Mrs. Sommerfeldt as saying. La Walker said no estimate had been Boot made of the value of the diamonds. Steller now is living with Mrs Fred, at a and that she lived in Ripori. The Somnierfeldts have a son, 18 and a daughter, 16. barn on the John Miller Turin, oc- cupied by Ole Rislove, was vir- tually toppled over, as was a shed and the windmill. Near Peterson, the barn on the Odin Grinde farm, was damaged. At Peterson, the 70 by 32 loot tin roof on the Agrlmson and Johnson store was blown off. That exposed to the rain two apartments, oc- cupied by the Martin Paulsons and the Byron Tebays. Their household goods and merchandise in the gen- eral store were badly damaged. Part of the tin roof on the Ernest Swalnc turkey house at Petersoa was also torn off. Peterson was without lights for a time, and there and at Houston this Root river went over its banks (Continued on Pace 3, Column T.) STORM Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winoua and vicinity. Consider- able cloudiness tonight and Sunday with occasional local showers or thundershowers. Lillte change in temperature. High today 80; low tonight 64. ____ LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 81; minimum, 64; noon, 79; precipitation, .08; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at ______ TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min, Prec, Bemidji 62 Chicago............85 Denver 79 DCS Moines ........85 Duluth.............57 Int. Falls ..........C4 Kansas City .......84 Los Angejes ......75 Miami............ 86 Mpls. St. Paul Orleans York 72 9G 89 69 105 90 !2 48 63 55 67 45 39 71 60 81 60 74 69 52 72 72 56 T. .01 .25 T. .61 .03 DAUL1T KIVER BULLETIN- Flood Stage 24-hr. Stage Today Change 2.6 6.4 3.5 3.7 4.3 2.5 5.4 9.1 4.3 7.6 9.5 1.8 Tributary Streams 1.8 1.8 1.5 0.3 3.0 _......... ________ 2.4: La Crosse at W. Salem 1.6 Reads 12 Dam 4, T.W...... Dum 5, T. W...... Dam 5A, T.W..... Winona. 13 Dam 6, Pool..... Dam 6, T.W...... Dakota Dam 7, Pool...... Dam 7, T.W. Zumbro nt Thcllman Buffalo above Alma -0.1 -0.1 0.0 40.1 0.0 -0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 40.1 40.1 0.0 0.0 -0.1 0.0 40.1 0.0 (From Hastings to Guttenbent) There will be slight rises at thr i the will occur additional morning's ;

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