Thursday, June 10, 1948

Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 10, 1948, Winona, Minnesota BATHER Turtly clonrty and flooler tonljchti nhowcm Ilkclyi rain I'rhlay afternoon. Full Leased Wire Newi Report of The VOLUME 48. NO. 97 WINONA. MINNESOTA. THURSDAY EVENING. JUNE 10. 1948 Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations FIVE CENTS PER COPY IS HERE Dial 97.5 for the Best in Radio TWENTY PAGES Mankato____ J______________________________________ Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach Dead Directed Department Since 1945 Heart Ailment, Other Conditions Cause of Death of La- bor Lewis B. Schwellenbach, 53, a former senator and federal Judge, died today after a long Illness. President Truman, a close friend and former Senate colleague, was notified Immedi- ately. The Presi- dent is In Schwel- lenbach's home state of Washing- ton on a speaking tour. Mr, Truman re- ceived the news nt Olympla "with the deepest re- gret." Ho termed Schwellenbach "a warm personal friend, a great senator, a great Judge and n. great secretary of la- jj0r" Sfhwcllcnbnch The Whlto House said Schwellcn bach died at a. m, at Walter Reed hospital whore he had been n patient since May 28. Mrs. Schwellenbach was at his bedside. The White Houso statement at- tributed death to "cardiac failure complicated his recent ill- ness." Funeral plans arc Incomplete. There was no immediate Indica- tion who Mr, Truman might pick for the cabinet post. David A. Morse Js under secretary nnd has been serving as acting sec- retary during Schwellenbach's 111- New U. S. Plane Goes Faster Than Sound Washinpton Air Sec- retary Symington said today the Air force research plane XS-1 several times has flown "much faster than the speed of sound." Symington told a news con- ference that so far as he knows no other plane has achieved super-sonic speed, that Is, faster than sound travels. The first and only pilot to fly the XS-1 beyond the so- called sonic wall Is Captain Charles E. Ycager, 25, a fighter pilot who destroyed 13 German planes while serving with the Air Force. Yeager, a native of Myra, W. Is a test pilot assigned to the air materiel command at Wright Field, Ohio. The speed of sound Is 763 miles an hour under standard condi- tions. Standard conditions are with a temperature of 59 degrees Fahrenheit at sea, level. Sound's speed of travel de- creases as temperature drops. At 67 degrees below zero Its speed Is 602 miles an hour. Thus speed of sound Increases as the temperature- rises. The XS-1 has n. wing span of Captain Charles E. Yeager 28 feet, a length of 31 feet and is 11 feet high. It carries pounds of fuel for Its rocket mo- tor. The plane was designed to reach miles an hour at feet and miles an hour at feet. ness. Towers Reduced Schwellenbach took over the La- bor department three years ago after Prances Perkins, one of the original members of President Roosevelt's cabinet, stepped out. Schwellenbach's death came in the midst of widespread labor troa blcs. But, of late, he had little toi do in settling labor-management! disputes. Congress had whittled: nway the department's powers and shifted them to other agencies. mcn6ncrlsc8 greeted his llistj west "todaT The swollen-Columbia year In office. and Frascr rivers built their three- Tired and worn after long hours week flood siege toward new heights. of conferences during the maritime; Three cloudbursts and a Jive-hour of lO'lO Schwellenbach vol- "gSTSf S boards would, be revived, for two years on a reduced scale. Russ Complain U. S. Propaganda Leading to War has com- plained to the American government and the United Nations that "un- bridled propaganda for a new war is being carried on in the United Moscow radio said today. An official note protesting that the United States is violating a United Nations resolution condemning -war- mongering was handed to American officials in Washington yesterday, the broadcast said, with. a. copy to Trygve Lie, secretary-general of the United Nations. A similar complaint was voiced about the Netherlands. iys primary eieuuuiis. The broadcast quoted the Russian With nearly votes counted as saying: in top Democratic races, _Mrs. "Despite the resolution of the sec- Congresswoman Loses in N. M. Albuquerque, N. M. Ap- parent defeat of New Mexico's first congress-woman overshadowed other delayed results today from Tues- day's primary elections. Georgia Lusk was accorded only an outside ciiance to overtake two other candidates for nomination as U. S. representative at large. Meanwhile, former Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P. Anderson pulled away to a nearly vote victory over Ex-Governor J. J. Dempsey for the Democratic nomination as U. S. Senator; and Governor Thomas J. Marby. Demo- cratic, betsed two opponents as decisively. Observers looked for the general election campaign to be high- ond session of the United Nations general assembly on 'measures to be adopted against war propaganda and adopted unani- mously by states which are members of the United Nations, unbridled propaganda for a new war is being carried on in the United States." There was no immediate official comment in Washington. The specific Russian complaint was against an article in Newsweek, 'which contains slanderous inven- Wilson Workers At Albert Lea Return to Jobs Albert Lea, Minn. The 900 workers at the Wilson Company plant here returned to their jobs this morning after yesterday's 24- hour work stoppage. Robert Hayes, president of local S CI.O. United Packinghouse Workers: said the demonstration, voted Tuesday night by the union, had served to prove "the solidarity of our ranks." The end of the strike, which was called five days after .the national union had settled terms with the Wilson firm, was voted last night as the local met to elect two new of- ficers. They were Seymour Flanagan, named vice-president to replace John Randall, resigned, and Nor- rls E. Peterson, chosen chief ste- ward in the place of Eddie Lahs. The union reported that Hayes, Peterson and Flanagan were all tions directed against union nnd depicting the the Soviet Soviet w union and acpicLiuy LIIU ouvici. lighted by the battle between as an aKBressor allegedly'pre- and Major General Fatr ck 10 attack the united States." tltn tn O Senate. Hurley O. P. inarched several abreast through courthouse and marched through the main floor to exit at another. There were no disorders. Pickets, who had been placed at at Milk Day Fete Harvard, III. Free milk was the special treat today at the seventh Harvard milk day, attended by a crowd estimated at more than persons. iVJOUia mwe w) tm__TT-iynlrf E Stas- today on their peacetime draft bill. 19 through 25 subject to two years' They began balloting on remain- service in the regular Army, Air sen Jlono5r Man Hijacked Truck Seen in Chicago considering a House-passed appro- priation bill trimming a billion-plus dollars from the that Congress authorized last spring for recovery aid to western Europe. Stassen asked the committee to recommend that the Senate vote the full and insist that the House agree to it. "I feel very deeply that much more than dollars, or materials, or recovery Is Stassen said "The most precious metal in all the world Is directly concerned. I con- sider this to be a question of the national honor of the United States of America." The Minnesotan took Issue with President Truman Indirectly by praising the record of the Congress. Yesterday, Truman called this Con- gress "the worst" in the country's history. Stassen said: "With all the difficulties that are naturally present with a congres- sional majority of one party and a president of another, you have nevertheless made one ot the most constructive two year records in for- eign policy of any Congress In the history of our nation." The House voted several days ago to spread the recovery funds over 15 months instead of 12 months. Tliis would have the effect of cut- ting the aid program by an amount jiiiu ting tne aiu program oy iui M.UIUU.IO among the nine men not invited to estimated at from day return to work by the firm. nnn nnn tn sr> nnn nnfl.nno. cool return to oy tne urm. 000000 to couiur wiiui During yesterday's work stoppage, gtasscn's personal appearance at afternoon. Low tonight 54; high the workers, some 500 strong gath- tlle Capito] added steam to the drive Friday 72. ered at Fountain Lake park and senator Vandenberg LOCAL WEATHL.K i-novxVinrf cnuovni nhronsf. t.hrouoh Official observations for the 24 marched several abreast through (R .Mich) himself a presidential UlEciai ooscrvauons iui ure the business district. They entered d ;k pOSSibiijtv, to block the hours ending at 12 m. today: one door of the Freeborn county move. ed" over JJUJ. r the strong battle being at Newsweek said the article "simply jnK reported the military thinking atjunkm officials explained they: the time in both Washington and I weren't necessary because "nobody Moscow." wants to go to work anyway." wVxiTo nvf.Irle." NGWSWCCk--------------------------- Appicton, Wis. Mrs. Anna Wolfgram, 72, was found dead in her home yesterday, a victim of gas which escaped from a kitchen stove. 'Ickets, who had been placed at waEcd M ECA funds. He is plant gates early m the morn- lo Icc] Ulat vandenberg has were withdrawn ater when tide u, favor ol the full Said LO JLUUJ v b 1 turned the tide in favor of the full Bemidji Chicago Denver The whole Newsweek said, "was -written around the fact that, in any nation, the military must always be prepared for any contingency." 'Worst President7 and 'Poorest Congress' Blows Enliven Politics __ _ i____ IXTrtc'Mncrf.nn "Riif- rnrl.ninlv Vie went On. tills By William F. Arbogast Washington The political gloves came oft today in the wake of President Truman's "worst Con- gress" blast and a Republican law- maker's "poorest President" retort. The long distance verbal slugfest showed every sign of turning the coming campaign into the roughest and toughest in years. The name calling started at Spo- kane where Mr. Truman, openly bidding for votes on his western tour, lashed out anew at the G.O.P.- controlled Congress. He told an audience that the people deserve more of the present "ongress if they fall to vote in 'ovember. G.O.P. Congress members struck back swiftly and pointedly. "There are a lot of com- mented House Republican Leader Halleck of Indiana, "who think Mr. Truman is the poorest President we have had since George Washington was elected." House Speaker Martin of Massa- chusetts added: "There are people who have said -.hat about the Pres- ident." Representative Hope chairman of the House agriculture committee, suggested that "the frigid reception which the President is receiving in the West seems to have driven him to loose and ir- responsible talk." Congressional Democrats were silent. As a minority not in con- trol of Congress, they excluded themselves Irom the criticism. As a matter o.' fact, Mr. Tru- man toned down his words some- what a couple of hours after hii first blast, 'Visiting the huge Grand Coulee dam later in the ciuy, the President said that 011 second thought may- be the Stavens" Cin- gress of Civil war reconstruction days was worse than this one. Youth Killed in Auto Collision Near Albert Lea Albert Lea, Minn. One young man was killed and a sailor home on leave critically Injured in a two-car collision on highway 16, 20 miles west of here shortly before midnight. Highway patrolmen said the dead youth was Lowell Langsez, 22, Brice- llyn. Brought here to Naevc hospital But certainly, he went on, this his left arm was ____j. _i___ Madison, Wts. Sheriff E. A. Fischer said today that an Eau Claire truck driver reported seeing the trailer-truck hijacked near here Monday night, at Chicago Tuesday. Fischer said Robert Bergman, 31, told him. he saw the truck about five hours after the hijacking tooK place at Middleton, seven miles of Madison. Despite this lead, District Attorney Edwin Wilkie said vwe are not very tor along." Wilkie questioned Ernest Fussom, .79, Harmony, Minn., driver of truck, last night and again today. Fussom told Wilkie and Fischer that four armed men drove him to Bristol. Wis., near the Illinois state line, while another man tooK the truck, carrying pounds of butter and eight cases of eggs, valued at B. L. White, owner of the trailer- truck, said the butter was property of Spring Grove, Mabel, Wilmington and Le Roy (Minn.) creameries. Tile truck, en route to Chicago markets, and its load were covered by insur- ance, he added. Minneapolitan Named Decorah College Head Minneapolis Dr. J. W. Ylvisakcr, pastor of Our Saviour's Lutheran church in Minneapolis, to- day was elected president of Luther college, Decorah, Iowa. Dr. Ylvisak- cr will succeed Dr. O. J. H. Prcus who resigned and will become presi- dent emeritus. Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity. Partty cloudy and cooler tonight with showers likely in the evening. Frl- lay considerable cloudiness and :ooler with occasional rain in the ECA G. Hoff- 88 sun set, rented "happy and reliev- night at sun rises tomorrow 'TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Fcp. Congress is the worst since he pot into politics in 1920 and even the worst in his memory. Back here tlie lawmakers showed no signs of tempering their -e- mavks. On the House floor, Representative Clevenger (R.-Ohio) said Congress not done then added: "High Tax Harry, like a nasty little gamin, has dipped his hands into the mud and dirt and plastered it all over our new bupgy and danc- ed out of reach of the whip. Might well be there will be some ConBress- the accident was Wayne Sailor, ID, also of the Bricelyn community. Two sisters of the sailor, a sea- man second class home on leave from the Great Lakes naval training sta- tion, were treated for cuts, bruises and shock. They are Donna, 17, and Darlcne, 1G. Officers said occupants of the sec- ond machine, whose names were not eXcmUCU WCU ou lALUie will uu .s-jiuu Presidcnt's tanned Missouri jackass hide on the Christmas November." House Democratic Leader Rayburn jumped up at that. He told Clcven- available, escaped with minor in-jDam 7. T.W. juries. The mishap occurred near the Wells Corner. Roseau Girl New- President of 4-H St. Paul Betty Miller, 18. Roseau, is the new president of ger the use of such language toward Minnesota 4-H clubs. Other offi- "any president" was an. "amazing performance." Representative Smith (R.-Wis.) said President Truman should not have used the language he did. but "I don't think we ought to sink to Ills level." cers, named at a session yesterday at the club's building on the state fairgrounds, included: Bruce Koer- ner, 1C, Lltchfield, vice-president: Lu Jean Skundberg, 17, Beardsley, secretary, and Marvin Olson, St. Peter, treasurer. 73 57 .05 78 55 88 56 DCS Moines......... 88 63 DuJuth 77 53 .03 International Palls 80 52 .09 'Kansas City........ 58 !Los Angeles 78 58 'Miami.............88 75 Mpls.-St. Paul .....82 C8 New Orleans....... 92 (38 .64 New York.......... 68 57 Seattle 85 59 Phoenix ...........105 68 Washington 74 60 Winnipeg 78 46 .07 DAILV RIVER BULLETIN Flood-Stage 24-hr. Stage Today Change 0.0 0.0 0.1 -0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 -fO.I -0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 FORECAST (From Hustings to Guttcnbcrfr) There will be practically no change in the river stages in this district over the weekend. Red Wing 14 Lake City Rends......... Dam 4, T.W. Dams, T.W..... Dam 5A, T.W... Winona........ Dam 6, Pool---- Dam 6, T.W..... Dam 7, Pon] 13 3.2 4.2 2.3 3.4 5.5 30.2 4.2 7.G 9.5 1.8 4.6 Tributary Streams Chippcwa at DHrnnd 1.5 Zumbro at Thcilman 3.9 Buffalo above Alma 1.4 Whitewater at 1.3 Trempcalcau at Dodge 0.2 Black at Ncillsvllle ----2.6 Black at GalesviJJe ----2.3 La Crossc at W. Salem l.G Root at Houston C.I La Crossc 12