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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, April 27, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 27, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER FM IS COMING Be imru your new radio can It. Full Lenied Wire Report of The Asiociated Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUML:  Hope Shrino auditori- um to watch tho selection of iv Mr, and Mrs. U.S.A. U.S.A., It turned nut, Is Clarence Ross, who might bi; described as Boulder dam with legs. or Clancy to his friends- I'm positive he has nothing but his physlquo from lifting bar bells Bar bells being a fancy nnmu I'or about 500 pounds of pig Iron DM u stick. In fact, he got his start by clip- ping 11 coupon nnd sending tawny for n bur boll set. I had the same slnrt, buc that's all. Tho exertion of. clipping the coupon put me In a resl euro for three months. Clancy Is not only well built, he's n.'Ully strong. I offered lo let him feel my muscle, nnd my tailor screamed. When hn took off his shirt, all the women fainted. Then I took off my shirt and he fainted. Miss U.S.A. Is Ihc former Miss Vul N.lord, and while; shu probably wont bu n.'cognto'd In Atlanllc CltV, Nho's going to do all right In nil points wosi. Miss NJorcl Is, to put II, gently, the strongest argument against the new look thai I'vo seen .Vol.. A.sldi; J'rom being beautifully feminine, sin; looks n.s though she could take care of herself. The guy Tho ncwlyweds said they would I who swoops her off her feet will remain hero overnight, go l.o Palmhuivu to UM: u snowplow. Springs for a fuw days, then fly to Pardon me, the salesman from Now York city. They sail May 0 on 'tho Miiurctriuln Jtor London, the. bulldozer company Just came In. In today's Pennsylvania pri- mary us Republican aspir- ants mulched strength In the po- litically important Keystone Elate. On the Republican side of tho ledger, a blank .space on the ballot win; expected l.o provide n Rumpling ol' vutrr .sentiment on the party's lending candidates although the bal- loting will hnvr no lire-convention United Auto Workers convention in Atlantic City Inst November tlis.it "I'd like to take a shot at Two unnamed tipsters told police the man wore a pistol on his belt nt the time he purportedly made the remark. It was nt that convention that Washington of a stop-SUissen movement were countered today by claims tlxnt Har- old Stassen may Ri'iib a share of Washington slate's 10 Ci.O.P. presi- dential noinlnutinK volx-s. Stassen spokesmen here said sup- porters of the former Minnesota gov- ernor, by workiiiR down into the precincts, have put themselves hi position to challenge Governor E_ DCWey's for control of the state's May 15 G.O.P. party nice tine. Reuthcr gained complete control Thftt wni name the 19 ot the U.A.W.-CJ.O delegates to the fce'pub- in wliming: re-election ns its jjrcsi- convention at Phila- dent. No charge was placed against the main, who was held for investiga- tion. Inspector Joseph V. Kruij said he claimed an alibi for the time ReuthCT was shot in his home a week todny, I'ollco Commissioner Hurry S. Toy wild tho man In custody wusi u steel worker nnd an officer in a. U.A.W.-C.l.O. local. Some steel plants c'.osely connected with Iho auto Industry are under the U.A.W.-C.l.O. Tho yesterday from a man brought Here from Toledo, the latest and most 'startling" In the police manhunt for Rcuther's April 20 assailant, Toy Reuthcr's arm was nearly torn off Just a week by a sholuun blast llrcd through the kitchen window at his home. He is reported to be mak- ing good progress toward recovery, and physicians believe the arm mny be repaired. Toy lilcntllled the police Informant only'as a minor U.A.W, olllclal. He said he was told the name of the man sought, bur, not disclose it, Andresen Urges Area Fish, Wildlife Protection Law WithliliiRlon Representa- tive August H. Andresen CR.-Mlnn.) said today Congress should write Into law "n. policy of protection" for fish and other wildlife In tho upper Mississippi river urea, Appearing before n. Senate inter- tn subcommittee, Andresen urged MTect on the slate's un- I approval of his bill, already passed pledged Ci.O.P, delegation. Democratic voters, at the time, were selecting their 7'1-mem- coni'cntlon delegnl.lon which al- ready has been pledged to support the candidacy of President Truman. A light vote was anticipated part- ly because of n lack of state-wide contests and partly because none of thn presidential candidates had campaigned actively in Pennsylva- nia prior to the primary. by the House, designed to provide such protection. It would prohibit the Army en- gineers from taking excessive amounts of water from the pools behind 1C dams and locks on the Upper Mississippi. Andresen said that in past years many fish died after being trapped! Washington Ed- win G. Nourse, presidential economic adviser, said today that unless thu war clouds deep- en, "business prosperity might well lie sustained for years ahead." Berlin American authorities announced today they will demand :in explana- tion from the Russians Inmor- or Thursday tus to why Ilerlln's chief of police fled to the western zones of the city. Rector, Ark. Ono man WHS Iiin-Mi'd duatli, another hurt critically anil :i country store was destroyed by (ire near here today as the result of a trafl'ln aeeitlent, A car and gusollne tank truck col- lided ill a junction of two stulo highways. delphia this summer. Dcwey backers reported that Stas- sen is only whlstlliiK to keep up his cour.iRe in Washington- They said control of Seattle and Tacoma dclc- renllons will freeze the out of the slJito eoliventlon. Bunkers of Senator Robert A. Taft im Id no one will have to look farther after the Ohio Tho former Minnesota Rovernor is try'nR to urnb 23 of. the state's 53 delegates away from Tii ft. 4 Armies Reported Poised has a majority of the delegates chosen thus far. The New Yorker picked up three more yesterday in Egyptian Armor Said Flooding Into Holy Land Hy The Associated Prrw The 'Jewish agency nppenlcd to tho United Nations today ui slop n threatened Arnb invasion of Pnles- An Arab source In Jerusalem as- serted Egyptian armored units al- ready had struck across (he south- ern 'boundary of Palestine, but Egyptian government quarters cate- gorically denied this. Moshe Shertok, hend of the Jew- ish ngency'ri political department, told the political committee of the U.N. general assembly at Lake Suc- cess (lie Tralis-.lordiui Arnb legion old warrior King Abdullah nnd irmles of oUvr nearby Arnb coun- tries threatened the Jews In Psil- csttnc. He said the Jews would meet any Invaders with force if the U.N. did not net. The United Stales, disregarding Shertok's appeal, n.sked again for Jewish-Arab cooperation and temporary trusteeship in Palestine, France asked for a 1.000-man vol- unteer police force to guard Holy places in Jerusalem. Haganah. the Jewish militia, said sv "general agreement" had been reached with the more extremist Irgun Zvnl Lcuml for joint action. In Tel Aviv, armed youths who said they belonged to the Stern group, robbed the Barclay bank of 000 In a daylight holdup under the eyes of Hagannh gusirds. To Semi Tronph A flood of rumors of Impending Arnb invasion developed in Jerusa- lem, where chattering mnchlncguni Heralded renewed Arab-Jewish sight- ing. One of these Jewish ngency spokesman wiui (.hut Trnns-Jordiin'n parliament run decided to ssend troops into Pal- estine immediately. The report came on the heels of a Damascus report Uint a Trnns- Jordan Arnb legion lind occupied town of Jericho and was mov- ng Into the Dead valley ol Pales- tine. This was discounted here ssince le- gion security forces we on Ion.ii to the British under both the old and lew British-Tralis-Jordau Reports thnt Haifa is being sshell- ed from Acre ncross the bay, were unconfirmed. Armies of the four Arab which encircle Palestine nre re- jortcd ready (o invade the Holy before the week ends. Thn reports said the forces of Trans-Jordan, Syrin, nnd Sgypt will Inuneh the thrum in de- nance of Die Uriti.sh mandate, not scheduled to end until May 15, and the United Nations security iilch has ordered a cease- fire In Palestine. (In London, the foreign offlce aa- dclcgatcs-at-largc. Sixteen district delegates previously selector! have expressed themselves n.s favoring Dcwcy. Chiang Troops Tricked; Reds Storm Into City Nanking Communist col- captured Weihsien todny, Chi- nese newspapers reported, but gov- ernment troops still clung to nn fore the British mandate ends.) Two Britons were killed In Jeru- salem todny, n.s tension increased over die tJireatencd Invasion. Large scale fighting reported in hnlf n doxcn other parts ot the Holy Land. Pensions Cited In Phone Hike Bid edge of the (own. The western part of tho city wns In flames. The reds had tricked the garrison Into relaxing by presumably lift- ing their ten-day siege, then smash- ing back in strength. Fifty government planes were re- bombing communist posi- tions and dropping munitions and .supplies to the garrison. Clashes nt widely separated points were, regarded as mere preliminaries to the expected red offensive In Manchuria, Red forces were re- ported atiacltlng Tnngshan, grcn.t con! mining center northeast of Tientsin, and Pingchuan, gateway to Hope! province from Jehol. Teacher, Five Students Hurt as Car Overturns by drnstic lowering of the pool levels, i Elkliorri, lonelier and Other wildlife also suffered, lie add-i live high school girls were Injured yesterday when their car overturned on highway 32 two miles south of cd, Andresen said that during the lost two yours, however, Army engineers Lake Geneva. maintained sufficient water In the I The Elkhorn High school group winter months to protect the wild- wns en route to Chicago, Injured seriously were Gloria Fuchs, daughter of Waller Fuchs; Mnribel HeisJcy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Helslcy: and Mary Mntheson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Donald Mntheson. life. R. J. Vcrchota, Wlnona, president of the Upper Mississippi Kiver Anti- Drawdown conference, sent the com- mittee n. statement favoring legislation. the 2 Die in Yugoslav-Italian Border Clash Near Trieste Koine A brief but bloody had moved a border marker near border skirmish lost night high- lighted for Italians todny the ex- pected coming struggle for Trieste. An Italian soldier and a Yugoslav nlllcer arc dead, three other Italian reported in a hospital as a result of a shooting scrape between and Yugoslav Dordcr patrols near the village of Raima Dl Luico, northwest of the free, territory, In Vcnezla Giulia. Italian officials said tho Yugoslavs, thu village and stood on ground which the commander thought was Italian. Shots rattled out from a Yugoslav muclilnegun, the Italians said. They returned the fire. A Yugoslav o.llcer nnd an Italian soldier fell dead. Three other Italian soldiers were hit. The Italians said they withdrew when 70 Yugoslav soldiers came charging down a hill on the 18-man Italian patrol. SU Pnnt Witnesses for the Northwestern Bell Telephone Company, continued on the stand todny In the stjite railroad and warehouse eommlnslon henrlngs on the eompnny'M recjuest for Inei'eases, The company Is asking hlghrr rules In eight Minnesota cltic.'v increase requested is expected to bring In on additional yonrl.v. In yeiiterdny's ftesslon, (ho mnln witness wns Glen Allen, vice-pre- sident nnd gonorn! manager of the firm. Ho said the rate increase would be the minimum needed to nssurc a reasonable return on the company's Investment. Allen nlso predicted Inbor pro- blems among Northwestern employes If the company were forced to cur- tail it.s fund. He .said the firm lins spent on the fund from July 1, lo March 31. IMS. Allen's testimony was disputed by attorneys representing Minneapolis, St. Paul sind Quhit.li. M. J. Holm- commission chairman, permit- ted Allen lo testify on the pension fund tiespltc objections from a representative ol the attorney general, the stale's three largest cities, and spokesmen for Roclicster and K'bblng. Other cities affected by the pro- posal nre Wlnonn, Austin nnd St. Cloud. An official of tho American Tele- phone .t Telegraph Company U-s- l.lfled today in the telephone rntc Hearing that a return of nt len.it six mid three-qunrtcr.s per cent is needed to carry out the firm's ser- vice program. The witness wns Donald R. Bel- cher of New York, treasurer of A. T. .Vi T. "The problem confronting the whole telephone industry in the United Belcher said, "is the same n.s thnt confronting North- western Bell in Minnesota." The witness snid the Industry aJ- ready has raised cxtrmely lame amounts of capital in the postwar jeviod in meeting the demands for service, but Dint further large sums, josslbly as much as axo goinc to be needed.   

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