Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Winona Republican Herald: Wednesday, April 21, 1948 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 21, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                w BATHER FM IS COMING irare your new radio can It. Full Leased Wiro Nowi Report of The Associated Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME NO. 55 W1NONA. MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING. APRIL 21. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES THE ALSOPS Town in Italy Balks At Truman Slewnrt Alsop .Whether or not ho rum In November, Prr.ildont Itnrry 8 Trumnn hnn nlrrmty faced for mltlnblo political opponent In tho llivllnn hill town of nbou hour out of Uoinr, Two lirr piilnlrd on wullii, One rends "A Vote fur I Mi' I'eopln'fl t'roii n Vo'n for Hlnlln." Tlio ollio rrndn "A votf for tho Rrpiibllnniu Vote for Trunmn." lloth   cimnd Hi" Riiiiiiliin.M of "armed In- vasion" of l.ho U. H. anil iifilcm! tho Rii.'isliin.H lo tnko nppl'OprlaU! action, v Amiirlcans Iduntlfliid tho woman n.i ISl.ia Pfuffor, a German, but the Russians snld she wns a Soviet sub- ject named Wlasenko, "who, like a intmbnr of her kind, hud hidden hcrm-lC In the American Tho Russians mild was a for- ho.'ipllnl employ" "who flrd from Iho nflor coiviinlltliiB criminal offonsc.i." Cain Amendment Stirs Housing Measure Storm WnxliliiKlun SiMiati! back- ers and t'oi's of public housing sciuiir- cd nway today for u showdown on Hint, hot issue. Tlio Senate bnttlo centers around an nmcndmi'nl, of Soimlor Cain which would Hl.rlku from TiiR-TCHnmliT-WniTlU'r long housing bill n sccl.lon uu- nK 500.UOO und opuruti'tl public housing units, Thnt Is the most hotly disputed provision of T-E-W measure, which Is nlmccl ut encouraging tho build- ing ot now homes during thu next ten years. Private Indus- try would handle, most or tho Job, aided by federal loans nnd subsi- dies. The Sennit; put In four hours of iiin-biiiiH ilubivtu on Cain amendment ye.'iLmluy without reaching n vote. There was jiomn doubt; whether I hern could be n Mnnl to- day. The Scnnlo yesterday adopted two public housing proposals .sponsored by Senator McCarthy who has been feuding with Tuft over that section for a week. 'Urge' Shooter Goes to Youth Commission Austin, IC-yoar-old boy who carried out a month-old urgn when hn fired a shotgun nl, an Austin woman, will be taken to the boys training school at lied Wing today. The youth was Judged dollnqunnl In Jiivcnlli! court Tuesday. Judge. Call Handler commll.U'd tho boy'lo tho recently your con- commission set up by Gov- ernor Yoiingdnhl. At Red Wing he will bo. exam- ined by .'ipcclnllsts beforis disposi- tion l.'i made, of his labor dlHputu tho national health and safety, Tho stnrtliiK date nnd closlnR date for the no days wns nof, immediately rlDtormlnnd. Tho Injunction, lliiulf boars no termination dato. Government lawyers wnld Iho 00 tlivyii should start when tho court's Walter I1 Rcullicr United Auto Workers president, shown in Grace hospital, Detroit, today, where he is t liken after a mysterious assailant fired a shotgun bla.st through a window at his home last night. sulTored severe chest and arm wounds. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The wnn Reuther 36 Costa Rican Officials to Flee As Revolt Ends Sun .Tone, CoKln Prc.'ildcnt Tcodoro Plcado Mlchalskl and nbout iit.hev cx-govrrnmcnt (ircli-rn liavo been compllpd with and lo flee revolt-torn tho Hlrlko ond.s, loy lu c ec .1 Armed troops rniuncd the slrm-Us of San Jose and sporadic shootlnu was heard, de- spite peace agreements aimed at ending civil war. The former officials booked rcscr, vnllons on Pun-American planes lens than 24 hours after the peace agreement wns signed by Picado and a ro.prescnl.nUvn of Josu Plgucres, l.ho rebel chief who led tho success- ful uprising after a presidential elec- tion was annulled last month. Mo.st political prisoners were re- leased yesterday from San Jose's prisons, including those held nt headquarters of the Vanguardla (formerly Communist) party. It was estimated that it will take three weeks for conditions in Costa Rica to return t.o normal. ;itlll Is a strike. Lewis Not rrcnent Lewis himself was nol in court to- day. He did not have to bo there iuit ho hnn another date Friday with Ho is to appeal l.hon and hoar whether tho Judge wll Impost further linos, or even u, Jal- .icntcncu, on tho civil contempt count. fines were on a crimi- nal conlempl charge. It was pretty clear that what Goldsborough will do Friday Will hinge largely on whether tho miners arc back nt work by then. Last night Lewis sent telegrams to nil district union presidents saying It was his wish that thr miners go buclc to work. Tin: district presidents worn passing tho word along lo In- dividual miners, Thuro Hill! was wldc.'ipread Idleness in the coal fields today. Many min- ers obviously were sore over the whopping lines ponud. Hut, Goldsborough im- were strong that normal operation of tho mines rnny bo resumed within a few days at the latest. Lewis' lawyers contend the Taft- Hartlcy act is unconstitutional. That will be ono of their argument points when they appeal the contempt fines to the Supremo court. Other labor unions make the same argument. The CIO announcement today that it will back the UMW's :ippeal In tho Supreme court because 'we regard the Issues as of groat Im- portance to the CIO nnd to the la- bor movement as a whole." Bullet ins Unit- ed Stains decided today to call on Unltc'd Nations xrcurlly council for action to buck lip Its unheeded Palestine truce de- mand. Frankfurt. Germany Robert Mnffi'InIT, American cor- respondent nxpiillctl from Mim- cmv, wild today Russian lend- ers apparently hold no belief thai Is ncnr. David E, Mllrntlial mild today tho Atninlo Kniirgy cninnilxiilon IIIIH found thai the metal cobalt of- fers possibilities of iirnvlilliiK: an Inexprlislvn Ireiilincnt of Spectators Applaud, Drown Out Acrobat's Last Words The spectators thought the fall of James T. F1U- landed on his two hands, feet in the air, on a table. In that position Meat Picket Dies of Strike Injuries strike picket at Armour Company's sandpaper and soap plant died last night of in- juries he sulTorod. in attempting to prevent pnssngu of a truck through the picket line. He was Santo Cicardo, 38, member of the CIO United Packing House Workers' union which has been on a nation-wide strike against major meat packers since March 16. Women's hats are going to be a ri.-Ml, deal Inrger this year, according o Waller l''lorell, one of the na- tion's leading hat designers So if you want to get a glimpse of the "new look" during 1918, you'll prob- ably have to pick up n. brim and peep underneath. As fnr as I'm concerned, the new style Is here al- ready I went to t.ho movies last Miner Hugs Rescuer After 18-Day Burial Turin Dispatches from Nancy reported that n. 30-year-old miner was rescued olive today after being burled for IB days' In a. coal ciiVL-lu. nt tho Potlto Rochello mine. Rescue squads had been able to drill i in nil- lino through to him. Al- though he hntl not eaten or drunk anything In all this time, he hnd enough energy left to Jump up and hug his rescuers. He didn't go back, to work cither management gave him another 12 dnys off. House Anti-Draft Fight Takes Shape Washington Signs of a hot fight in Congress began to take shape todny. A second member of the House armed services committee came out flatly against nny peacetime revival of selective service. Ho snid still a third member, as yet unidentified, will vote on the issue. "I'm ngnlnst it, nnd tho people back home arc ngainst Re- presentative Bishop (R.-H1.) told a reporter. "I have found that out. Other members of tho House will rind it out, too." As House opposition began to take voice, Representative Engel (R.- Mich.) estimated that raising the armed, forces to the sizes contem- plated by .draft bills now under consideration would cost the country at least more a year. Bishop made, his stand known as the armed services committee began studying details of a revised draft bill sponsored by chairman Andrews -Andrews formally In- troduced the measure yesterday utter four days of testimony from draft opponents. Tho Andrews bill would nul.hor- ...o tho armed services to reach a total of men by July I, 1050. That would be men above present strength, and more than the number asked by Secretary of Defense Forrestal in the administration's combined draft- UMT bill. Legislation to put every man In the country Into government serv- ice In wartime was recommended boday by Dr. Vannevar Bush, In a letter to the House armed services committee, he said a future war would require tho united effort night and for 20 Of the nation's entire manpower nc- mimitcs I to each Individual's ability. "This would mean universal serv- ice to be put into effect without he wrote. "Legislation, for this purpose should, therefore, be ready in case of need." I was watching a Jungle picture Then I found out the coconnut tree wns 011 the hat of the lady In front of me. It looks ns though women's hal.s will .soon be so large the only person who will able lift them on" the round will bo Howard Hughes. Ciirmcn Miranda. Is going to keep up with the trend She's rcplnc- hor grapes and bananas with vntrrmelons. I know of one actress whose new ml, covers so much territory, It's go- to have a mayor, My brother's making a fortune because of the new styles He bought a lot of pup tents at a war Patrick, an acrobat, was n new stunt. Tholr applause prevented his table picked' from the surplus sale and .stuck a feather on le with his teeth. Then ho col- each one. And he's selling them to llnnl words, as ho died or a heart attack, from being heard. I'or '10 of his 54 years ind been an acrobat. Last night al a VFW show here, he dove over louv chairs placed in a lino and lapsed. Ralph Dnpenes, of Pittsburgh, master of ceremonies leaned over tho fallen man, thinking filso it wns a gag. Queen Mary. One good thing about this new style though We won't have to n worry about having a woman presl- Hc discovered Fitzpatrlck dent In '-18 Her hat will be too for breath. I heavy to throw into tlie ring. Italian Labor Hints Aid Stand Change Home Italy's communists, overwhelmed in the election, re- ceived a hint, from their top Inbor leader loriny or nn nboiil-fftcn on Uio Marshall plan. The communist.s opjjosed Marshall plan aid throughout campaign. Smarting from their worst defeat In free voting, the communists also faced the possibility of a serious rift with some of their left wing so- cialist allies. With nearly complete returns ap- parently assuring the American- bnckod'Christian of con- trol of both houses of parliament, Giuseppe 1D1 Vlttorlo of the com- munist-dominated General Confed- eration of Labor Indicated It wants to take a stand on American aid Independent of Moscow. Oinclal returns on nil but 355 Of the precincts In the Cham- ber of Deputies election gnvo the Christian Democrats 48.7 per cent of t.ho vote, a total of The communist-led Popular Front, had or 30.7 per cent. In third plnco WIM-O tho nnU-communlM Socialists, with or 7.1 per cent. Final Final official returns on the Sen- ate vote gave tho Christian Pcmo- crals or 47.9 per cent; the Popular Front, or 31 per cent, and the anil-communist Socialists, or seven per cent. Thus Premier Alcide DC Ga.spcri's Christian Democrats seemed assured of being able to form a govern- ment with the Independent Social- ists, with whom they arc closely allied in the present government. The Christian Democrats apparently do not even need tlie support of the other anti-communist minor par- ties. Freedom Giuseppo Romltn, left wing .social- ist and former Interior minister, Joined with flve other members of his party in an Invitation to mem- bers to take steps to "regain the In- dependence" of the Socialist party. The left wingers under Pietro Ncn- nl had split with the independent Socialists over the communist fu- sion Issue and. allied themselves with the communists in the Popular Front. Dl Vittorlo, communist leader of the. Confederation of Labor, an- nounced he intends to ask the execu- tive of the World Federation of Trades Unions (W3TTU) to let each country decide Its position on the Marshall plan Independently of Russia. This, he said, would let labor in each nation decide on tlie basis of the country's needs. Tafty Stassen Square off In Ohio Industrial Areas Columbus, Ohio Senator Robert A, Tnft and former Governor Harold E, Stassen of Minnesota squared off in Ohio today in their battle to win Buckeye delegates for the Republican prcsidcnllal nomina- tion. For Stassen, who was to arrive at Dayton by plane this morning, the next four days will be geared to the whirlwind campaign pace he fol- lowed in sweeping to primary vic- tories in Wisconsin, and Nebraska earlier this month. Ohio's primary Is May Tal't. on the other hand, takes of- ficial cognizance of the stiff battle he expects the to wage for 23 of Ohio's 53 delegates by start- Ing a steady campaign In ll districts where Stassen opposes him. Stassen seeks delegates In Ohio's industrial regions, and Taft opens an ambitious speech-making, per- sonal appearance tour with six talks in the key northeastern Ohio sector today. UAW Chief Blasted in His Home Arm Shattered; Detroit Manhunt Gets Under Way nelroll The CIO United Ante Workers todny placed a S100.- 000 price on the head of tho stealthy gunman who tried In vain to kill Waller P. IVuUu-r. Their reward offer followed one for' by the city of Detroit, launched on a great man-hunt for the assailant who fired a shotgun into Reuthor's Kitchen Tuesday night. The Auto Workers' president wsis gravely wounded but his doctors said he would live. They added that they have saved his right arm. torn almost off his body by tho blast. Police Commissioner Harry S. Toy mobilized the full strength of his department behind the man- hunt. But he had little to go on. Witnesses said the gunman fled la darkness in a "red sedan." Reuthcr's private secretary said he recently received two unsigned letters threatening him with harm. Two Threats Mrs. Gwen Martinson, his sec- retary for about six years, said ona writer attacked him for his fight against communists In the ranks of his big C.I.O. United Auto Work- ers. The other criticized his cam- paign to admit Negroes to public bowling tournaments. "He got.s a lot of crank letters and 1 threw these Mrs. Martin- son snld. Prosecutor James N. McNolly said three neighbors of Reuther told him a single man ran afoot to red sedan Idling nenr tho eurb the time of tho shooting. Tnt- cm Jerked into motion and sped nway. Jack Horvill, detective chief. IL snwcd off shotgun may have bwi the weapon. H was Ilred about eight to ten feet away from lighted window, TiirttK to Reuthcr's phynlciiinn mud thnt only tho fact thnt Reuther turned to- wnrd his wife nt the moment tho wns fired twviM him from rr- the in the chest. Tliivt sudden unplanned move saved the union leader's In their opinion. Police Commissioner Toy ordered the Canadian border between De- troit and Windsor sealed against nny escape ntwmpt by the driver of the red sedan. Ho ordered a roundup of all kncAvn communists in tlio city, nit Keuther's "Irlon-lst nnd enemlen" mid his neighbors in the quiet northwest area where he lives. All be questioned. Rculhei-, himself, blamed "man- agement, communists or a screw- ball" for the attack. The U.A.W. C.I.O.'.s cxecut-lve board met In special sesslttn. pledged by Secretary-Treasurer Emll Mazey to "spend nny amount of money to e.lenr this up." We'll get the guy who did It If we have lo turn tlie whole town upsido down." he Mild. lied Ton The 40-year-old red-haired, ag- gressive U.A.W. leader has long been avowed foe of communism. Currently his big iiuto union. which speaks for nearly workers of the car planus, Is press- Ing Its new spring wage demand on the industry. Rcuthcr shot a few minutes after returning home from a meet- ing of the U.A.W, International ex- ecutive board, As he stood at a refrigerator In the. breakfast nook of his home on ,he northwest side, a blast was fired through a window four or five feel from him. The charge struck his right arm. One slug penetrated his cavity, stopping near the skin sur- m Momnch area, Flood Isolates Area in N. D. Fargo, NY. O. Northeastern North Dakota looks more like ocean will) hundreds of small is- lands than like farmland with oc- casional bodies of water. The city of Graft on, on the Pork: river, appeared hardest lilt and most completely Isolated. Only ono block, the one In which the school building Is located, was nbove water. Tlie rest of Die city wns a virtual lake. Some residences and business places apearrd to be in about a fool of water: others were in nbout five feet. IVnple. were rowing down tin- streets In i.mitll boats. A few miles east of town several per- sons paddling rt rubber rail towards Grafton, possibly going after food A few stubborn persons were gunning their ears through streets, splashing spume high Into the air, Farm yards were completely swamped, water reaching up to the windows of some machine sheds and hog houses. Strawstneks and wren trees reached from the flood- waters to give an added feeling of desolation. Highways had been rip- icd by water, but not before some Farmers had a chance to move their cars, trucks and tractors onto high spots on the roads. There the ma- chines stood, surrounded by water.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication