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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, April 20, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 20, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                EATHER FM Full Learned Wire Newt Report of The Associated PreM Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations W1NONA. MINNESOTA. TUESDAY EVENING. APRIL 20, 1946 FIVE CENTS PER COPY IS COMING Bo yonr new radio can SIXTEEN PAGES Lewis Fined Jail Term Hangs Bids Asked on New City Sewer Projects Mayor Asks Start on Swimming Pool m I WT v As Soon as New Sewer Line is Ready Lift Stations Mayor John Drupy Is on the lino lor a swimming pool. lip wants to SPP It built noon us tho sowers nnd water mains uro rxlondocl to lh.n silo selected for tho outdoor pool. This positive stiUnment fnvorlntf tho pool a change; pre- viously he tins moroly iitutod thnt thin Is not an appropriate lime to build thn pool. Now ho says ho wants to sec tho pool built. That Isn't nil. Tho mayor wants to sec the early completion of tho uclmlnlNtrtUlon. building nt tlio new municipal airport. "It dlioulcl bo hurried a.s much nakl ho. In his unnunl stutcment, to tho council, while proskllnR at the boKlnnlnR of tho annual meeting last Mayor Druey cHecl those as expected accomplishments during tho coming year: 1. LulttiiK of tlio contract for Housing Bill Senate 0. K. Seen Today flmiiito of thr Tftfl-Kllpndiir-WikKnrr hfiusliiK bill by nlKhlfull was prodic-tod todny by Sotmtor Tnft (H.- Tuft mnrtf this forecast In thnl dirfrfcncrs botwncn him ftonalor McCarthy (It.- over bill ftiipcur to bo hrartod toward settlement. "I think wn will bn nljle In work out compromlsp." Tuft snld. Ohio senator n co-sponsor of the T-K-W measure. Its- backers hopo It will notistruoilon Of new homes by 1060. Thn bill would oxlend noxl Ihe tiovprntneiil's aulhorlly to insure home loans. Jl would per- mit Insurance of wn additional worlh of loans, InolurtlriK nulhorlMd In 11 Die in French Mine Explosion I.lllit. At toast 11 minors died In u dust nxploslon at li ooal tnlno at Hallnumlnos Inst nlicht. officials announced today, They said tho fatn of six other persons remains unknown, Two K'rl workers, who wore at tho plthoiul when the Wast occurred, am mlss- Init, as urn four Clorman prisoners of war.fwhc- wore at work deep In The measure also provides lor liberal hfmin loan on low cost houslnu, for Kiinrunteelnit In- vestors in rental housing prom, for stum clearance, and MnCnrlhy hnvn wen odds over amendments lo mil. McCarthy Kot 14 onnnices last week. Taft has n motion pendlrtK whloh would nil of them and, substllulfl n of banxlnx comrnlttoe Rmvndments hp Is baoklng. McCurthy said ho Is wllllnK to nowpt two of four whloh Mo- Oftrthy says are the most Important of his series. are UIP MoCarlhy which Taft said would 1. 'A sootlon under whloh the would pay half the cost of homes for seriously voter thosn who wheel chair cases. permanent 3, A provision allowing the, gov- ernment to oust from public housing tenants who aro earning more than top salary specified as ft condi- tion of occupancy. This amount vnrlw among housing projects. Gov. Green Is G.O.P. Keynoter Governor Dwluhl Ctrcen of Illinois do liver thn keytiotr address at tho lie- puhllcun national convention this summer, A 33-mornbpi1 O.O.I', arraignments committee selectnd Oreen UK temporary rhalrman of thn con- vention, In thai capacity ho will deliver the keynotn address, .Joseph W. Miirtln, Jr., Of Mas- sarhuseits who Is speaker of the House of Representatives, was nom- inated to srrve IVK permanent chair- man of (he roitvPtiUon lhat opens In Phllnilflphla .IUIIP 31. Martin's nHcrtlon must be ap- proved tiy tin1 coiivniitlon (Iplniiatfs nefure It tMM'dliiPS (iflH'lal but this tx merely a formality, n committee Walter M, llallitnlin, national corn- mlttppmnii friiin West hpntls Ihn nrraiiKPiupiits oominltten hotdlMK a two-dny meet.- IIIK here. Oilier convrnt.lon posts urn pspertPd to he iiitmetl, KIKln ycitrs lino llut'old K, Mtussen, thru Kovernor of Mlliiii'srtta, made Hie krviidte ndtlrpss. Ill Kl'l'l C-'ull- fornlu'i (hivi'i'tmr Kivrl Wiirrtin was Uie Ct.O.I', keynoter, Mitckonxlo King Day in Office Ottawa This Is I'rlme Mill- Inter W. MnckPiulIn KliiK'n day In tifflrc. That UIP llrlt Uri rommoliweiilth recoMl fnr service in such it, position, set 300 years OKO bv Hlr Robert Wnl- ptiln, prime minister of l.irllaln, Tomorrow will be KlnK's 7.1131st. dny In office. That Will lireuk the rrri.nt. He nxpwls to retli'n In Au- Miiming Fritz Kuhn Sontrncocl to 10 Yonrt Munich, rierniHiiy Ktilin, rnlssliiK former lender of the Orriimii-Amerk'iiu lllllid. wus rtnivleted In absentia today by a liivvnrliin eourl as n major Niu.l offeiuler, The nl-yeur-old Clrrmnti was son- lenced lo serve ten years tn a labor camii If he Is ever found. He cscniwd from mi Internment cmnp HI Dachau lint February 4. Crushing Red Defeat Indicated in Italy from Italy's crucial elections Indicated today u smashlnR nntl-comrmml.st victory and Vice-Premier Cthifieppo Suraf-tut announced "tho communists will not be ad- mitted Into Italy's now government." Sarngnt. head of tho nntl-communl.it Socialists, told newsmen: "The Italian election means n. rebirth of democracy In Europe. Tho victory of democratic forces Is n Rrcat setback to Russia and communist plans for uxpanslon. "Italy In now a pan. (if western JCuropo and not of Lho Ualkann." Thu returns from three-fourths of Italy's senatorial districts showed tho antl-comtiuiiilst parties two to Ihn pit 'i ty Thirty minors were hospltallviod, Is 15 mllos from hero. snld 303 mon wore at work In nt Iho tlmo of tho explosion. Weather fKDKHAL FOHKCA8T8 Wlnona and and cooler tonlK'tt; lowest 40 In the city; 3B In tho country. Tuesday partly cloudy nnd cooler; highest Minnesota: Clearing and cooler lonlKht. Wednesday partly cloudy, becoming warmer west, Wisconsin: Clearing and cooler tonlKht. Wednesday partly cloudy nnd cool. tOCAL WKATIIKR Omolal observations for the 24 hours cndlrtK m. today: Maximum, 03: minimum. '10; noon, precipitation, truce of rain; sun tonlKht at OiM; sun rises to- morrow al KXTENDKD FORECAST MlnnosolA nml pornturo will nvcrntro about five de- crees abovo normal north to seven- ton degrees abovo soulh portion, Normal maximum northern Min- nesota to OB In Wisconsin, Normal minimum 32 northern Minnesota to 43 south, Cool Wednesday becom- ing warmer Thursday and southern sections Vrldny. Cooler Saturday and warmer western sections Sun- day. Precipitation will average iwo to four tonlhn Inch from northern Minnesota throiiKli northern and eastern Wisconsin with HUlo or none otsowhoro occurrlnK as scattered showers northern sections Thursday and Friday and southeastern sec- tions Friday or Saturday, TKMI'KHATUUKS KLSKWHEKK Max. Mln. Free, Hemldjl............47 IU one ahead of tho communist-led Popular Front coalition. Premier Alcldi: Dn Oasperl's Am- erican-backed Christian Democratic party had almost half the, total voi.es In the election lost between the en.it and the went, and may yet got an absolute majority. Itarly Ilciurns TCnrly returns on the Chamber of Deputies Indicated a similar crush- ing defeat for the communists, The returns raised tho possibility that the nnll-communlsts had seized un- disputed control of both houses of the new Parliament, Tho Interior ministry's tabula- tions on tho Sonato vole, counted first, Kavo tho Christian Democrats ll.17l.6flD, or 47.4 per cent of tho vole, The Popular Front coalition of communists and loft-wlnif so- cialists KOl or fll-3 per cent. Returns from of sec- tlorM Jn Iho vole for tho Chamber gave tho Christian Democrats tho Front, and tho nntl-eoinmunlst Socialists, 303, Tho votes for minor parties swell- ed tho anil-communist total. Alcldo Do Oasporl, Italy's Christ- ian Democratic premier, said tho returns were beyond his fondest dreams, Do Clasporl said his party's victory showed Italy's "firm intention not to bo Denver Den Molniis Dulllth ItUortmUuiml falls Kansas City AnKolus....., Miami Mpls.-Ht. ['mil Now Orleans New York Heutlle 1'hotmlx Washington Winnipeg .........Ml tin 72 70 fl-l 113 M 111 :u (M us 47 :IH 'Ml 00 611 nn .in mi 47 R'J III! .00 .03 .OS DAILY lUVKK IIUI.T.KT1N Klood 34-hr. Today OhattKO llnd WlMK Lake City Itimds....... Uam 4, T.W. [Jam D, T.W, Dam T.W Winonii..... Dam II, Pool [Jam 0, T.W. Dakota 14 11.1) ILL ll.fl 11.11 n.i 11.7 D.4 7.7 Uixm 7, Pool Dam 7, T.W. Crossti 12 'I'rltiuiary Hlrennw Chliipowa at Durnnd ;i.ll M Thellmnn 2.5 lluffalo above Alma 1.0 Triimpealeuu al DodKO 1.0 nlnck at Nelllsvllle Illlirk at Oalesvllle 3.11 .4 ,2 ,1 ,2 ,1 ,1 .1 .2 ,1 -1-1.1 ,1 Crnssn ul W. Halom Koot.nl Unlislon 0.0 IlIVKIt I-'OKKCAHT (From tu fliiltriil.rric) The Mississippi will continue full- InK but morn rapidly In this district for several days with average dally tails of foot abovo Luki) rnpln and ,'J foot dully from Almu south- ward. Tlio Rods Silent communists had little to say. Plctro Ingaro, director .of the communist newspaper L'Unlta, said In a formal statement that tho Front "without doubt will represent a decisive clement in tha future parliament and in tho country." Tho Vatican-backed Christian Democrats triumphantly invaded tho so-cftllod "Hod North." Returns In Milan showed tho Christian Democrat party and Its allies run- ning two to ono ahead of tho com- munists In tho Chamber elections, In Gnnoa, a communist stronghold, tlio anti-communists had n com- fortable load. In communlHt-gov- ornccl Florence, tho Popular Front was trailing. Violence flared again at some points, Milan police  frightened by a chair, but he had a good lawyer who got him off with 20 years. Then there was one guy who went to a psychiatrist and complained that his walls were moving. Of course, they found out later ho was living In a trailer. I heard that the arrangement In one Ruy's house gave him a real problem. He shared the place so JOUR with rclatlve.s he developed a split per- sonality. And I know people who hnvo n neurosis against visiting Atwatcr Just because he has tliick They're worried because a. couple of people stepped into his living room Jnst Thursday and haven't been heard from Yes. sir, interior decoration con really make a guy RO off his nut. Especially, if he comes home in the dark, "tries to sit down, then discovers Ills wife has rearranged tho furniture. Kent rURK. Washington John L. was lined and the United Mine Workers for con- tempt today, and the government kept hanging over Lewis the threat of a jail -sentence. The possibility of Jail still remain- ed because Judge T. Alan Oolds- borough imposed the lines only for criminal contempt. He will act Fri- day on a finding that Lewis and the UMW are guilty also or civil contempt for failing to heed a. court's stop-strike order. Assistant Attorney General H. Graham Morison said the govern- ment mlRht recommend a Jail nen- tcncc Friday If the coal miners are not working. He said frankly that the purpose of Uie delay was to see whether tho miners now settle down to full work- ing schedules. It was not clear from reaction In Uie field what the miners might do. Some said "We got a dirty dcal.- Others called the fines "not too Frank Hughes, president of the United Mine Workers district three, today declared fining of the union. and 'Lewis would not Kettle the 1s- ic. Morison recommended only for criminal contempt. ouRh accepted the recommendation but said It had been his own Incli- nation. to send Lewis to Jail. .Taw Twitch Lewis sat silently through the pro- ceedings In U. S. district court. HU massive Jaws twitched but otherwise he Rave no sign of emotion. But his attorney. Welly K. Hop- kins, cried out that the government attorneys were demanding "their pounds of flesh." He also accused the government or motives. That brought protest from Morison and Oolds- borough ruled tlie remarks out of order. Hopkins shouted: "God forgive them. They know not what they do to all tho men. women and children In the jurisdiction of this union." Criminal contempt is a penalty for disobedience of a court, or Injury to tho dignity of the court and iU orders. Civil contempt proceedings are means for enforcing a court order if unobcycd. The fines are Just double what the bushcy-browcd UMW chief and his miners had to pay after they similarly were found pullty to 19-W of contempt for Ignoring a stop-strike order. Then Ooldsborough fined and tlie union but the Supreme court cut the unlon'i fine to Immediately after Goldsborough. acted, Green that punishment of labor or labor leaders for exercising the right to stop work "will cause resentment la tlie minds of those directly concern- ed and by those who are indirectly affected." Will Appeal Lewis' Attorney, Welly K. Hop- kins, filed notice of Intention to ap- peal the contempt conviction. This was done right after sentence imposed. Under civil contempt. It would be possible to impose a fine that In- creased with each day the miners were Idle; a fine of a day. for Instance, for each day the miners stayed out, Hopkins, the union's lawyer, told tlie Judge such fines as the govern- ment suggested would inflict "grtcv- out injuries" on tlie miners. He said the penalties asked for "wore without parallel." Speaking of the miners, said "I say to the government arc not second-rate citizens." Ho added: "There's no caste system un- touchables as yet." A.F.L. President William Issued a statement saylnn Screen Writer to Appeal Conviction Wnnhlnirton Hollywood Writer John Howard Lnwson todny planned nn opprnl from his convic- tion on contempt of charges. A federal court Jury look two hours and 15 minutes to reach It-i verdict late yesterday. The Jury found the 53-year-old author of '.such films as "Smoshup" and "Blockade" guilty of contempt for refusing to tell the House com- mittee on un-American activities last October if he was a communist. LawKOn's attorneys argued at the trial that he hadn't refused to an- swer the question. They said he was in the midst of answering it "in hU own way" when Committee Chair- man J. Parnell Thomas (B.-NJ.) ordered him removed from wit- ness chiilr. Lawson Is the first of ten Holly- wood figures to be tried on the con- tempt chargo.i. Farmer As Tractor Over Onto Him Minneapolis Hasmus An- derson. 65, was killed late Monday when Hcnnepln county sheriff's de- puties reported a tractor tipped over onto him on his Bloomlngton townaWp farm.   

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