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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: April 17, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 17, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                tlrnr out to rclnx nt the conroronco between group discussions, Playing the plano.ls Dennis Moran, Hethman at si. Johns uni look on. Some toured the campus guided by local 1 cla Oulhane. freshman at the College of Saint Teresa, out the rig and Margaret Smith, all sophomores at Austin Junior college, and Robert serums, junior a photos w EATHER wftfmur Full Leased Wire Newi Report of The Associated Preit pM Member of the Audit Bureau of IS COMING irare your new radio can VOLUME 48. NO. 52 WINONA. MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING. APRIL 17. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY THE ALSOPS What Is Kremlin Up to Now? Itximr, Itiilr Alinp On the eve of ftnllnn elentlon, poll- tlrni iipneutntloii In tills llUennely political city eenters, only less than on the outcome of the election it- nclf, on ono question. It Is an old fnrntllftr fiue.it.lott: Whnt In the Kremlin up to now? MIC HovletN hnvn unneeourit- ulily rhiMien n iiioinent liiiinedlnlely brfbrn the erurlal vot.ltu; hrumiuel} to rejeet tho western proposal t  cow by 1'nlmlro ToKllattl nnd otlter Itnllnn communists for some pro- StftUnn gesture, Moreover, and most mvstrrlou.ily, there wa.t no vIMblr Kremlin should Theory niiinlx-r It Is widely hrld sei-inii even more dan KrroiiV "The Krenillii wniit.i to liwr ttv- Ttiillnli eli-r-tlon." Tt 1st ren- Koncd thut Hi.' Kremlin Is now con- srloin I hut n vlefury for the cwn- niuiii'l." lien- rniiiht well oituntion hi which wivr Hoffman More Aid to Italy Ten Years of Cold War Seen by Utley Ton yours ot cold war. Is tho prospect faced by America, Russia rind tho rest 01 tho natloni! or this world, according to Clifton Utloy, nnwiicdiitor, who 200 dnloBiiUw uml 1100 observers nt tho Noi'thnni MliifllwilppI Vulloy eonfrn'onco or Intonmtlonul ndution Club.M ut tlio or Siilnt Torc.su Friday evening. Mr. Utley's prcml.so la that tho Soviet expects tho United States to undergo at lonst two major economy-upheavals within the next ,1- Mtnf nf fnrl Death Penalty Possible in Best Treason Case rrtwton why tti. hnve made nny response on the Trie.ite proponai nt. nil. 'Die lenst they eould have done, In the In- of their Itnllan comrnunl.it allies, wnn to wall until nfter the rlretlon.i. Whnt, then, Is the Krem- lin up to? Tlir. f'AMMIS to the Olinl Dor- uny. to Downing slrert nnd to Wnnh- IriKlon. are humming with specu- Intlon on the answer to this conun- rtrurn, nnd the politically minded Ilntlnno are argulnc their favorite theories, four main theories hnve been advanced to explain the bnf- Kovli-r netlon. None of them entirely sensible. Yet they mnke nn Interesting' ll.it. Theory unrulier one l.i simple: arc lu.it Jnmes Hoo.Mi-velt wns reported re, Tln-rc may he Mimetiilni! to thl.i, covering today from the era-els of but It in' niivlouily a dniwrnur. mixing headache and nlucpliiK tab- bus I r for flWCKilliK Soviet, policy, tlhe remained nt, .St. John's hos- Robert H, Best, n na- tive of yumtor, 8. C.. today faced n po.iMblo death ncntonco for treason la broadcasting propaganda from Clorrrmny during tho war. A federal court Jury convicted tho former Kuroponn news correspond- ent his OUnd of nl'l 12 overt nets contained In the government's Indictment. JuclKo T'riincl.i J. W. Ford conti- nued the ciL.in Indefinitely to rnltoct on disposition, Tho maximum pon- nlty Is dentil. It tuny be ris llttlo as flvo your.'i imprisonment and n fine, decade nnd hopes that tho effect of at lofist ono of thoao will bo to forco withdrawal of this country's aid to ERP nations. It may be noon, therefore, thnt It Is to the Soviet's ndvnntngu "to continue u iicml-cold wnr, hunted up at precise (ilrnlnod Intervals, throughout the next decade nnd to wait us out." Wo can expect u continuance of her U. N. he said. Mr. Utley endorses without re- nervation, tho ERP, suggesting ik ovcntual implementation with such tangibles ns a mutual assistance pact with tho Western Union na- tions, n, military lend-leaso pro- gram and a draft. Passage of military lend-leasc "wil. bo undertaken by conscience-stricken congressmen nltor November as semi-recompense lor their pa.'is James Roosevelt's Wife Recovering lleverly Cnllf. Mrs. pital In nearby Hanlri Monica last ilKht, lint doc to MI iinld sho wns out f dntiKer. create n tnke which sent Mrs. Uooscvott, 32, v iii-itni- 11 in vii iiv n v oiiv i! i ww. hich wivr with theao tlm Imspltnl In a coma; heart-clutching provocation policy." would Inevitable. Thn Jllin lind been itufTorliw from so- clccrcaso of Britain's In- (In" not want wnr now, vere liriitlnohi'.'t nnd llin doctor hncl In world nlTnlrs, lllo com- Hie Kremlin IB Klven tier hendnchn Lnblias. Shi; pointed out, "America has t t ti t it) 1 inrl H m n HID I'll III. Illintlt t..i......... i u 11 n III ii it 1_ lhi  In Itie ti'illuli fare, ff Mils Is Indeed the motivation behind the ItuvlMMI Klnnd on Trieste, the Kremlin huN badly fiil'irnleulatetl. No one lii-re h yet ready to write ofT the powlhlllty of a rnliuiuinllt at the polls. Vet no one doubts thnt the i-ontrn.itIIKf Western mid Kunslnn on Trieste, hnve shnrplv and perhnp.i dlxn.n- trouMy weakened the comriuuilst Tlieorv number four l.i simply thai the iliiviel straleKlsts have written otT In advance the chances of ruplurliiK Huly hy li'Knl and drmoeriiNe means, Thu.i tlie.v hnve rterlded Inslj-iid to KtrenKftien their poilUon In Die lliilkiin.i hy n tolIKh otiind on Trieste, iiiennwhlle plan- the rapture of Itnly Inter nnd by other iiipiiii.i. You piiyn ymir money nnd tnken your choice of the four theorien. Meanwhile. I he passionate over the Hiisslnii stand on Trieste nrrves to uiulerllne the most stl'lk- Ink- of ltie first Impressions which crowd In upon the mind of the. (Continned on Column 6.) At.SOl'S .nt.lll MitTerlnK. nhn KOI up inlfltuku took tablets from the wronit boltlu. It contained n clrnft-UMT act Ml Utluy predicted, "Amurlca, ns England's replace ment In the balance of power tug- of-war, will bo drawn into a future war II there must bo a future Mr, Utloy observed. His program is, he qualified, "a program for a durable pence, not for n permanent peace, "ERP will provide the five per cent margin of success In Western Europe's eventual ho ad- vanced. "Tho 1C nations and West- urn Germany will provide D5 per cunt of the rcsuscltntlvo effort." One of Throe Courses After tho ten-year period, the Soviet Will follow ono of three courses, Mr, Utley dogmatized: "She will cease her pa-sent course it (iiitiKer. "She win cease ner present cournc KIT luinband, V.D.W.'M eldest son, Of opposition and try cooperation thin explanation of the mis- m. wm resort to wnr, or stio will resort to war, or ttho will continue with her present t.ook (ionic nt liedllnin, moro itl nboul iho old Urltlsh rolo of nl- Id ii, in, 'riiurndny. Wlih tho second wtrongest bloc Tlii'n about :i n. in. yostcrclny, or against tho then-present .it.lll HUfTerltiK. ntin KOI, up and by lets. "The doctor tells mo the, combi- nation wns too much for ridd- ed Uoo.'ievelt, who ohnlrmnn of Mm California Umnoernllo central coliimlMei'. Un Iinld hu did not know how many ot tho two kinds of tablets she took. 2 to Die on Espionage ChnrgCA in Yugoslavia llplgmde, ViiKoslnvliv Two men we.ro sentenced to death by n t.juliljnnn court In.'ili nlRht on clinrKen of KlKht other defendniitJi, IncludltiK two priests nnd llireu woiiuin, nicolvud prison xentencvn. Iiuivltnblilty of war was forsworn by Mr. Utley. "It would he stated, "thnt when wu think war is Inevitable, wo concern our thinking with how to how to pre- Hum hasten Its advent. "Urltl.sh downswltifc has led to tho creation of a power vacuum In Eu- rope, a vacuum tho Soviet is, each be-crlslscd moments trying to Mr, Utloy pointed up, "Factors In Russian cxpnnslonlstlc thinking would bo economic Imper- ialism nnd Pan-Slavism; those addi- tional to cvonpcllstlc ho said. "America munt nil the circum- stance-created vacuum or face the (Continued on Tarre 2, Column 1.) COLD WAR 23 Perish in English Express Train Ramming Crew, I'liigliind A Olasftow- Uindnti mall train plowed Into a iitnllwd express near hero today, klllliiK pontons nnd Injuring 33 others In tlm splintered wreckage of Muveri piuuiiinKcr conches. Survivors mild iv passenRor had ntopped thn express liO minutes be- forn by jiulllnn an emergency cord, They did not say why. The (illicit Britain's railways pumnd Into uovornmenl hund.i Jnnunry at p. ju. 1'rlday near Wlnaford, Che- shire. Wlnsford is about 150 miles northwest of London, A British Railways press ofilcer sold the mall train hit tho roar or tho London-bound express. Suvun conches of the passenger train wore wrecked and four coaches of the mall train derailed. Rescuers, working by Improvised lights, dug into tho wreckage for Injured, who could be heard scream- ing. Water was sprayed lo protect rescuers from possible fires they hacked through tho torn coaches with acetylene torches. Lewis Asks U.S. to Void Court Order End-Strike Edict Cancellation Is Demanded L. Lewis today demanded that tho govern- ment act to end a court order dl- roctlng him to call off the coal mining stoppage. Tho demand, based on grounds that tho coal dispute hn.s been set- tled, was sent by tho United Mine Workers' chief to Attorney General Tom Clark. The letter was signed by Welly K, Hopkins, TJ.M.W, counsel. Tho order to which Lewis re- ferred was Issued April 3 by Fed- eral Judge Matthew F. McGulrc It directed Lewis and his union to get tho soft coal miners back in the pits. They had been out on strike since March 15 in n. dispute over pay- ments from tho miner's pension funds, About two-thirds of the 400.000 minors )mvo returned to work this week but tho others arc awaiting tho outcome of contempt of court action hanging over Lewis. Tho McGulrc order was obtained by the government under the na- tional emergency provision of the Tnft-Hartlcy labor law. This provision says thnt when a settlement Is reached in the dis- pute, the attorney general must ask the courts to discharge the anti-strike order. Tho attitude of the Justice de- partment lias boon that it doesn't know whether a settlement lias boon reached or not. Tho union claims that when Lewis and Bridges agreed April 112 on tho tentative terms of pension payments for the minors, tho dis- pute was scltlcd. Quirinb Installed Philippines Head Philippines went Into 30 days of mourning today for their first president under Indepen- dence, Manuel Roxns, who will be buried in state April 25. Tho mourning was proclaimed by tho new president, Elplcllo Qulrino, who took tho oath In short and sim- ple ceremonies not long after he ar- rived from tho central Philippines this morning. From now until Sunday the body of Roxas, who died of a heart attack Thursday, will lie in Malcnnan pal- ace, tho presidential residence. The state council, meeting with Qulrino, recommended that the Philippine Congress adjourn until after the funeral. The funeral will be accompanied by all tho honors this young republic can bestow. Burial will bo in North cemetery, where Manuel Quezon, the wartime president, lies. Largest Food Convoy Reaches Jerusalem .Jerusalem The biggest food convoy ever sent from Tel Aviv and Palestine con.st points reached Jerusalem's hungry Jews today. Nearly 300 trucks loaded with flour, meat, vegetables and dairy products rolled Into town for the otherwise Isolated Holy City Jews. A strong Haganah (Jewish mlll- guard accompanied tho convoy over the road, which lately has been under Arab fire. A small group of priority passengers came with It, including a number of Jewish igoncy officials and participants In tho recent Zionist general council meeting at Tel Aviv. Tomatoes Disrupt Pro-Wallace Rally and as- sorted vegetables disrupted n Stu- dents for Wallace rally at Pasadena City college yesterday. Severn! missiles hit Spanker Aver- ill Bcrman, a radio commentator, as ho spoko in opposition to military IrulnliiK. Pollco Look six [students Inl.ii e.uitl.mly, warned nntl rn- luimod lliejn. About I.UOD persons attended the open-air rally which Principal John W. Harbeson said was not sanctioned by the school administration. Unit Renews Farm Price Supports After Oleo Tiff Washington The Dixie- Midwest battle over olco taxes to- day threatened a wider split in Con- gress over other farm legislation. The olco-butter battle exploded anew ycstcrdny In the House agri- culture committee after building up for days. And It drove a wedge be- tween the Midwest dairy country and the South, which producer, the cotton and peanut oil that go into oleo. The discussion, behind closed doors, was over whether to continue farm price supports to June 30, 1950. The committee finally voted approval, but not before reducing the support level of cotton from 92.5 per cent to 90 per cent of 'cotton heretofore has had the highest price support level of any basic crop. The new price support bill, which now goes to tho House floor, would put cotlon at the same level as other basic corn, tobacco, rice and peanuts. Although oleo taxes did not out- wardly figure in the committee ac- tion, the dairy country members demonstrated what might happen to other southern crop .supports If federal taxes on margarine are re- moved. The bill also continues supports on other commodities, ranging from GO per cent of parity to the highest support level in force for 3048, Among these products an; mill: and buUi-rl'al., poultry, ong.s, curtain dry beans mid pirns, .soybeans, flaxseed and potatoes. And dairy state members wrote in a provision which says .supports for milk and milk products cannot go below 00 per cent of parity. Without the continuing legisla- tion these supports would end De- cember 31, Finn Premier to Resign If Russ Pact Not O.K.'d Helsinki, Finland The Finnish Parliament, heading for a vote April 23 on the proposed Rus- sian-Finnish treaty, received a warning last night from Premier Mauno Pekkala that his cabinet will resign unless tho pact Is ap- proved. B' ulletins Vienna. The Russians today lifted all travel restric- tions on the road lending from Vienna lo the British airport inside the Soviet of Aus- tria, British authorities an- nounced. New Speak- er Joseph Martin said last night lie "would talk with .Toe Stalin" if that would prevent a. new war. Madison, J. Mchl, Madison, one of the na- tion's outstanding distance run- ners while a member of the University of Wisconsin truck wiis named to the Badger faculty today. United Nations Calls For Palestine Truce Success The United Nations security council early to- day called upon tho Jews n.nd nilM to ntop flKlitliiK In J'nlnntlnn. Tho council laid down wix HPB- clflc truce directives to the two factions but at the lost minute killed a. provision to send a tr.N. commission to the Holy Land to check an compliance. Russia refused to support the but Andrei A. dro- myko withheld his big-power veto and abstained. The Soviet Ukraine Joined Russia as usual. This made the final ballot 9 to 0. There was no assurance that cither the Jewish Agency for Pales- tine or tho Arab Higher commit- tee, representatives of Palestine Jews and Arabs, would lay down their arms. Direct efforts to bring them together failed previously and the council drafted detailed truce terms In a move to get their ac- ceptance and bring peace to the Holy Land. Mosho Shcrtok, head of the aRciicy'w political department, told the council In tho midst of the voting that the plan could not suc- ceed unless the U.N, sent a com- mission to the scene. As mandatory power in Palestine, the British have the responsibility for bringing the Arabs and Jews together. Both factions declined comment here. Indications were that the British would deal with the two groups on the spot. There is no direct enforcement provision in the truce terms. Gromyko refused to support the plan because the council overrode his demands that Arab armed bands be ordered to leave Pales- tine. Only the Ukraine supported him. Russia also opposed a ban on political activity in the Holy Land. House Shies From Draft Law Race Segregation Ban Costa Rican Rebel Chief Threatens March on Capital Washington House armed Di-s Mollies services committee members today Duluth shied away from puttinK a flat ban International Falls, on racial'segregation into a draft Kansas City jaw. Los Angeles They also showed reluctance to Miami write 'in any board deferment for Paul scientists, technicians or ciiRinoers. New'Orleans Both matters, several members New York told reporters, should be left to ad- Seattle minlstrators of the law. Phoenix As it stands now the bill the committee would Rive the Pres-i Winnipeg idcnt wide authority to defer men DAILY HIVE because of occupational or profes- sional skills. Aides said the committee tcnt.a- Million in Coal, Flour to Be Shipped Scelba to Halt Election Unless Vote Fair New York Jose Flguercs. leader of the rebel forces in Costa Rica, said today he would march on the capital, San Jose, "if the communists keep blocking settle- ment" of tho civil war. He made the statement in a telephone interview from Cartago, 75 miles south of San Jose. piguercs said the fortress defend- ing Cartrigo fell to the rebels at 2 n. m, yesterday. His forces occu- pied the city itself on Monday. Figucrcs said he captured the gov- ernment garrison nt Cartago and the hostages who had been held there to prevent him from directing artillery fire on the fortress. He described himself in the inter- view as neither a general nor colonel but "Just a, modest civilian." Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Wlnona and vicinity Considera- ble cloudiness and warmer tonight. Lowest 48. Sunday partly cloudy mild in the forenoon turning cooler late afternoon. Highest 10. Minnesota Mostly cloudy to- night and Sunday with occasional light showers northeast. Warmer south and cast portion tonight and Sunday becoming cooler northwest portion Sunday. Wisconsin Considerable cloudi- ness, windy and warmer tonight and Sunday with scattered light showers northwest portion. LOCAL WEATHER. Official observations for the 2-1 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 71; minimum, 32; noon. 2; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow ELSEWHERE Max. Mln. Prec. BcmldJI Chicago <52 33 Denver 74 45 61 42 75 90 81 55 80 55 04 102 40 30 Trace 31 Trace 48 G4 GO 39 57 .32 tlvely has decided to boost the Army's manpower celling from 000 to And the Army, pre- paring for a possible increase in strength, prepared to poll reserve officers to learn how many are will- ing to return to active duty. Tho Senate appropriations com- mittee will begin hearings next week on a Housc-appVoved bill to start the Air force toward a 70-group figure urged by Gen- eral Omar Bradley, Army chief of stalf. Greek Army Presses Spring Offensive Athens Lamia dispatches said today the Greek army is pressing Its thrust ngninst more than miles rebel-Infested ter- ritory in central Greece. Several sources said the large scale vttack was the opening of the Na- Jonnlists' spring offensive. One said to troops are in- volved. 61 45 <12 36 .04 R Flood Stage 24-hr. Stage Today Change 0.0 -0.2 -0.2 -0.2 -0.1 Red Wing M 3-6 Lake City 12.3 Reads 12 85 Dam 4, T.W. 9.0 Dnm 5, T.W. 7.3 Dam 5A, T.W 8-6 Winona 13 9-4 Dam 6, Pool Dam 0, T.W. Dakota Dam 7, Pool 3.3 Dam 7, T.W. La Crossc 12 fl.3 Tributary Streams Chippcwa at Durand 4.0 Zumbro at Thcilmaii 4.6 Buffalo above Alma Trcmpcalcau at Dodge 1.1 Black at Nclllsvllle ----3-5 La Crosse at W. Salem 1.7 Root at Houston 6.0 -0.3 -0.3 H-1.3 -0.1 RIVER FORECAST (From Hastings to Guttcnberc) The Mississippi in this district will continue falling with average daily falls 0.2 foot at most stations for several days. Tributaries will not change much until heavy rains oc- di cur. On the eve of tho Italian elections, the Economic i, Cooperation administration said to- day that more in foocV- coaJ nnd other commodities will shipped to thnt country, France and the Netherlands. Paul G. Hoffman, EGA chief, sold these shipments will be in addition to in aid authorized for the three countries earlier this week. The money for purchases comes from the new European Recovery pro- gram. Hoffman listed these allotments to the three countries under the ship- ping schedule: To France: coal, SS.C58.000; wheat flour, TO Itnly: coal, wheat flour, soya flour. 000; rolled oa1.s, To the Netherlands: wheat, 01-1.000. The total for France is and to Italy Suspend Election Italy's interior minister held out a threat today to suspend this week- end's fateful election "if the liberty of the vote should be compromised." Mario Scelba, whose interior min- istry controls police, saiO in his last campaign speech here last night: "The government will be on the watch. If the liberty of the vote should be compromised, It would not hesitate to take the most radi- cal measures, even the suspension ot the elections." He repeated his oft-made charge that Genoa's communist mayor had Issued false voting certifi- cates, three to Soviet employes of the Genoa Russian consulate. The spcechmaklng campaign end- ed apparently In peace, last mid- night and a 32-hour pre-election cooliiiK-off period began under a cabinet decree forbidding further political moiMlHRS. The authoritative. Rome news- paper Mcssagero quoted Christian Democratic Premier Alcide Do Gaspcri as saying in a Naples Inter- view last night he thoucht his party would do belter this time than In. the constituent assembly elect.on of June C. lfl-16. No Serious Incidents No Incidents nart been reported serious enough to prejudice the vot- ing. But wiih reports the front has slipped in recent weeks, rumors have thickened that the communists would try to lighten the vote to their advantage by some means 01 intimidation. The balloting will be for 574 mem- bers of the chamber of deputies and OT senators to compose the nrst parliament of the Italian repub- lic born in 10-16. The makeup of Parliament will determine the make- p of the government. Voting will go on from 8 a. m. to n m tomorrow and from 7 a. m. 10 p m. Monday. (Italian time is eight hours ahead of Central Stand- A complicated system of count- mi; is expected lo delay the first returns until Monday night and the jll results until Wednesday. The two houses of Parliament that m-e to be elected will choose a president. The president will give ,c pany or group of cooperating Ics with the biggest support in two houses the job of forming government, consisting of. a premier and his cabinet. If one party should obtain con- rol of the. upper house and another larty the lower, formation of a government would be blocked. The president then would be allowed to dissolve parliament and call a new election. up 30 full tho pnrtic the the   

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