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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, April 15, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 15, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER FM IS COMING Be rare your new radio can tt. Full Leased Wire Newi Report of The Associated PreM Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 48. NO. 50 W1NONA, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 15. 1946 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES House O. K.'s 70-Group Airmada Funds U. S. Airliner Crashes in Eire; 30 Die? One Survives; 20 Americans Aboard Plane Cause Unknown; Crash Occurs Near Runway Shitnnon Airport, Kirn Con.itollfttlon piano flylntr from Cnl cuttn to Now York crashed today ul mfi.il a half mile short of land inis nniwiiy here and all but one o the HI aboard perished. Pan-American World sal' thp plane. "Kmprow or tho Skied, WM mnfclnK it rotitlno Instrumen uppronrh, It crushed Into flamln (ret from thn run wny, the air line added. The dead Included IP American Kir lloml Mehtn, wealthy Tn dlnn Muro Worst, an, of Burbnnk, Cullf wits the nolti survivor. Ho fin Id th force cif thu crush throw him on through the bitKKUKC compartment wife, waiting nt the nil-port tc meet him, witnessed tho truKocty Worst munuKpr of Lockheed Avlu tlori Corporation's base nt Shannon Ixxikheert builds tho Constellations four-eriK'ned crnft castlMK about 000.000 ouch. No KxpUnfttlon There was no Immecllnto oxpluna. Won the cause of thi crush. HuslI Wurnock, Amnrlcnn airlines stnllorimiutU'r iv fthannon, mild weather observers rti portpcl three-mile visibility nt thi time of thp p. m, Wed' nesdny. Other sources said, tho coll- Intr WM nbout 400 feet. Worn told reporters: "We had como nround once mid wf wrrp mafctnK our seaond ap- proach when tho crush occurred. Up to this everything nppeurod to bo normal. I wiwi slunn out throuKh the compartment but X was only uliKhUy Injured on tho An announcement Issued by Pan- American's traffic niunucor. William jnwgerald, suld: "Aboard thp plane woro 91 pfissen- tiers and a crew of ten, of which 30 American, five Italian, two In- dlnn. ono British, one French, one and onp The crush occurred us tho bl( plune came In for n fiecond try nt mnln ulr strip. Witnesses Mid It apparently hit nn obstruction ulonK the ground for n wnyfi Mid then burst Into flnmo. The wreckage burned more thnn throe hours, "I don't know what happened. Wurnock said, "but tho pilot couldn't make it." The "Kmpress of the Skies" claim rd to have not new trims-Atlantic record April IP, 1M7, by landing here five hours nnd 85 minutes nfutr leavlnK Guilder, Newfoundland Weather rr.nr.nM, FORECASTS Winomv itnd vicinity Partly cloudy umlKltt nnd Friday; no Im portanl kemperuture chittiKO, Low tonight 44; hiKh Friday 70. Minnesota Considerable cloudl IIPM tonlxhl and Friday with scat- tered Hunt showers extreme north portion lonlKht, Warmer tonlKlit cooler north portion Frl dity Wisconsin CJonMderitbln cloudl new InhlKta unrl Friday with scat- t-rreM Until Mmwrrs simltiwesL lute tonik'hl or early Friday. Wanner south mid I'entntl. I.OCAI. WKATIIKK Official observations for tho 2-1 hours ending nt 12 m. today: Maximum, (Hi; minimum, :ill; M; preelplluUon, none; nun tfinlKht lit sun rises to- morrow lit TKMI'KUA'ITKKS KLSKWIIKHK Mux. Mill. True. IlrrnldJI til Dfs Nfolnrx ijuiuth InlprlmUriiml Fiillx, Kiin-.ui C.'lly UK AliWli'H Minim Mills -St. I'HIll Orleans Nrw York Mruttli- DAILY 71 on VI IM 77 till 711 >l.rl 2-1 :m 4f> aa Truce fin IKI 'tt> 40 54 ;m .6 i IH Truce It ItUU.KTlN Jtrd Wlnit l.itfce City 24.1tr, Toduy Change H.7 ,1 13.5 .1 I mm 4, T.W, Hum r., T W. Piim T.W. I'J Pit lit T.W. 11.7 ft 2 7r. II. V tut fl.u n.r> no Wreckage Of A IMn-American World Airways Constellation is scattered over ground almost half a milt) from Shannon airport, Eire. The plane, New York-bound, crashed and burned today while mak- ing u routine Instrument approach. Only ono person survived the crash which took 30 lives, Wlrnphoto to Tho (A.P. 2 Die, 39 Injured As Truck Smashes Into Dallas Rocket Russ Roadblock Cuts Off U. S. Austrian Air Base Vlf troops today ot up ft roadblock which Isolates the American air base at Tulln, 14 miles wont of Vienna, Tho nuwilnnti demanded "grey" dentlflcatlon cards. Some U. S. Air Torco personnel ravolInK to work from Vienna were ermitted to paw after lonpr arRU- mcnt.i, Othorii wore refused cloar- Kremlin, A dump truolc crashed Into a speeding Bock Island train yesterday derailing throe coaches nnd killing two pas- sengers. Thlrty-nlno others were injured, three critically. Tho impact knocked the coaches Into a freight train on a siding and two of the coaches caught fire. Tho loft sides of three coaches woro ripped off. Those killed and most of tho Injured were riding in tho coach hit by tho truck. Ono of tho dead still is uniden- tified. The other victim's body was re- duced to a torso in the flames, making direct Identification impos- sible. Authorities said, however, they believe It to bo a man. Thrco other passengers are in critical condition and 30 more, in- cluding tho truck driver, suffered Ian Interpreter, lOirold Vooth, Vienna manager for Pun-American Alrwuys, suld Amcrl- uii military pollen ut Tulln were no llowliiK his employes lo return to 'lentm, Tho morning flight from Prugue 0 tho United Stutos left on sched- le since tho bus passed tho Russian heckpolnt before tho rood block was ot up. iungnrinn War Refugee Rape-Slaying Klko, Hungarian war nfUKen shuttered the quint of his rellmlnury hearing to scrnnm dc- lul.'i that he raped and murdered minister's wife, "t don't ask I say 1 what 1 sny murder ne- know Lasxlo Var- u, 10, shouted in a tiny, packed ourtroom, Tho iinwMimpnrH these tlayn urc ill of comrtumU't nbout tho prosl- cntlal election Democrats will do ho Republicans will do third party will do. from Dl.icus.ilng how and If Dut atildo ,1 I iJitJii 7, Pool Uitrii 7. T.W. ,1 13 [if. ,1 TrlhuUry Nlrpiiiun rhU'prwii lit iMII'lind 4.4 .1., nt Thelliiiun IHifTulo iitinvii Alma 2.'J .2 Tremiiriileiiu lit- I Xnlur I.'J Jtlitck at Oitle.ivlllo 3.H ,'J Koot nt Houston 11.3 HIVKll HMCUTAST (Krom Iliistlnm to OiiLLenhurR) The rlvrr will continue fulling IhlN rllntrlrt. T'lm aver- nK" dully fulls .1 fool over Hie weuk- rnd. one small paragraph, I see little mention of tho newest (us of yesterday) party, the vegetarians. The headed party Is by Dr, John Maxwell, (15, who admits he doesn't expect to be elected but does expect to voton. Dr, Maxwell may huvo more buck- Itiil'mTiiHi Ing than I think. From the looks of what you bnrcly find under the gravy on tho blue plates In most of tho restaurants f'vc eitton In luloly, they're- trying to do u mibllo rncriillliiK Job for his putty, Como to think of U. if the moat pnrknrs' strike continues, I wouldn't bo nurvrl.'ind to I'rciildiint Tru- iiiitn Jump tlto Democratic nomin- ation and tuki' u nncond npot with tJi1. Maxwell nnd his brother broc- coli busters, A vccntai'lan administration might not bo KO bad. It's powlblo It might srt an example to olluir nations, iimnc of wtilnh havn boon acting lately If Ihoy woro Knttlnu too much inont, nnd raw, at that. of here. Critically Injured was; Professor Raymond Dvorak, nationally known muslo leader xnd member of tho University of Wisconsin music faculty; right nrm amputated; Enid General hospital. Stassen Bids for 23 of Ohio's 53 Convention Votes Robert A, Taft laid plans today for an all- out effort to choke off Harold E. Stassen's delegate-winning streak when the two tangle In Ohio's May 4 Republican presidential primary. The Ohio senator told a reporter he frankly is both puzzled and dis- appointed by his poor-third showing in Tuesday's Nebraska ballot battle. "But I'm ciulto confident that things will be different In he added. There Stassen is bidding for 23 of Ohio's 53 votes to the Philadelphia nominating convention, The former Minnesota governor headed into Taft'.s territory today after promising at Minneapolis to carry on the work of "developing a vigorous, forward-looking hu- party." ra nosptiai. manltarian Republican York's Governor Thomas was running 15 minutes late from Kansas City to Dallas. ln Train Lain ran -cond Sta n Kremlin IK u small grain elevator town of about 200 In tho prairie whcatlund, and thu Rocket usually runs through at (12 miles per hour. Yesterday afternoon, however, .En- gineer Clarence. Kester lifted tho speed to 711 to make up the lost lime, Conductor I. N. Wilson said. As ho flashed toward a rising grade crossing ho saw tho heavily loaded truck approach right, It was driven from his by II. M. Lruighlln, 'M, Oklahoma City, work- ing for u roud contractor. "It looked like It was slowing down to let us pass, but it came right on into thu said Kcs- tcr. The lust three cars leaped from thu track and the whale train plunged crazlly forward in clouds of flying dirt for more than three city blocks. Laughlln tmlfcrcd only buck and leg Injuries. Boeing 'Stratojet' Completes Tests now awopt- wlng "Stratojet" bomber, which blasts itself oil runways at a breath- taking angle, has miccossfully com- pleted four months of tests, N, D. Showaltcr, flight test chief for tho Boeing Airplane Company, yostcrtltvy reported "highly satisfac- tory results" In tho tests conducted from tho Mo.io.i lake air In cen- tral Washington. Tho announcement of tho comple- tion of tho tests followed release of a photograph showing tho XB-47 taking oil at tho angle of a well-hurled Javelin. Tho dramatic picture showed tho 00-ton planu al- iiost HtantlliiK on end in tho air and trailing .imokc from all 18 of its lato (Jet assist) rockets. Fire Chief's First Blaze Damages Own Apartment Conwiiy, Ark. Shannon Whlttcn served nearly a half month as Comvay's first fire chief, before thoro WHS a Ilro to fight. Then hln first alarm sont flremnn to Whlllon's own apartment house where n blazu caused damage. the Cornhusker popularity test, meets the former Minnesota govcr- 51 Civil Suits On District Court Docket One Criminal, 8 Divorce Cases on Calendar The spring term of district court will brlnK forth u calendar heavy with personal Injury suits and Hunt with the usual divorce cases, it was announced today by Clerk of Court Joseph C. Page. There are El civil cases on file. A Lotal of In dniniiRCK mostly Incurred UK u result of ul- liiBiid iienlli-ient driving will murlc U'.R court culuncliii- with n. HLory which should bo slgnlllcant to ul! automo- bile drivers as well as police and sul'cty olllcials. Only Din: rrlmlmil IIIIK br'cn ll.stud, Elgin, illvorco prouiicilliiKM uro .slutud and six cases have bcuii carried over from the last court term. District court will convene at 11 p., April 10 nt which time there will be an Informal call of the cal- umlnr and dt.'Slh'nntloii ol1 court cases for trial during thu first week of the term, Thu court will convene at 2 p. m. for arraignment of crimi- nal cases, motions and default cases. The ri.'iniiindoi1 of thu llrst wcfilc will be occupied In l.he trial of court cases, thu hearing of motions nnd miscellaneous matters. Asked in One Suit During the second week starting April 20 the court will convene at Judge T. Alan Goldsborough today heard argu- ments in the John L. Lewis contempt trial and put oif any decision until Monday. Assistant Attorney General II. Graham Morlson argued for the gov- ernment that Lewis and the United Mine Workers were clearly in con- tempt of court for continuing a coal mine work stoppage for a week after a court order was issued for It to end. Attorneys for Lewis made only a Lewis Contempt Ruling Due Monday one-sentence argument: failed to the trial of jury cases. Heaviest dnmaffe asked is which Bert Gile. Wlnona, is seeking 'Thc government has prove Its case." That came from Welly K. Hopkins chief of the eight-man buttery of counsels Lewlfi has. Goldsborough then. adjourned court until Monday. Now the only thing left In the contempt case Is the Judge's ind the punishment if thi! ruling is for conviction. Despite Lewis' order of last Mon- day for the miners to get back to coal digging, many thousands still arc out. They were waiting to sec what happens to "Uncle John" "Beyond cavil or Mor- Isoii said, "the testimony points di- rectly to the fact that these dcfcnd- ints did not comply with the order of this court and that they, and each of them, are guilty of criminal nnd :ivll contempt beyond a reasonable If Goldscorough found them in contempt, he Could levy almost any lines or imprisonment. He is the Judge who ruled Lewis was p. m. for a peremptory call of in contempt in 1946 for disregarding the calendar and petit jury call and a court's stop-strike order. That time he fined Lewis and the union The Supreme court cut the union's line to J700.000 but let In a suit from Frank John .Lewis' stand. Callan and John Richard Clayton! There lias been much speculation of Lowlfiton. Islnci! the present caso began that a Thu .suit-i's-the-Tcsnltrorsn-iratD-- contempt finding this time _-would' n-.obilu-bicycic accident September" 15, 1947. The plaintiff charges that he was riding oast on Third street lead to at least a suspended sent- ence for Lewis. A suspended sentence would keep ind an automobile owned by FrankjLewls in the shadow of prison bars driven by when the union's soft coal contract nor again In the May 21. Oregon pri- mary. The Nebraska count, with only 17 of the state's precincts missing, gave: Stassen Dewey Senator Arthur Vimdenberg thn two Simon men. He charges and John Callan and Clayton was proceeding west on'runs out June 30. Third street. The complaint charges: Another dispute is a distinct pos- that Clayton was on the left side of isibility even over the the street and that his car was out'pcnsion issue since Monday's sct- of proper control with the result'Moment was only tentative. drove into the1 plalntlir. Resulting injuries caused a concussion of the brain and per- manent shortening of the left leg as well as internal Injuries. The sum asked for includes medical costs and loss of salary through per- manent and total disability. Donald T. Wilder Is counsel for the plain- tiff. Russell P. Swenscn and George, Owen Brchmer, are at- torneys for the Cnllans and Tyrrell fc Thompson for Clayton. A freak hay wagon accident has caused John Tldcfur, Wlnona coun- ty laborer and farm hand, to ask personal injury costs from Alvln and Elmer Simon, Winona county farmers. Hurt While Haying Tlckfcr states In his complaint that he hired out as a farm hand to the Simon brothers on January G, 10'17, at a salary of per month through the winter months nnd per month through the summer months, plus board, room and wash- Ing. All went well with his affairs as a "hired mim" until July fl. when Tan, he win; at work In a. hay Held with 8.8G3, General Douglas MacArthur Governor Earl Warren of Cal- ifornia and House Speaker Jos- eph W. Martin BUG. Tho rcUmui gave Stamen K! nf the stale's 10 votes on thu Ilr.'it nom- inating ballot at Philadelphia. But that he was ordered to climb up on top of a load of hay that was hitch- ed to a tractor and'Which Elmer SI- mnn was driving. Tic.ltfi-r status l.hnt lui did as ho was told and climbed up on the wagon load of hay and that Elmer Taft backers still hope to pick up started the tractor and they left the some Nebraska support in later bal- field to go to the barn. However, lotlng. The results, of the prefer- when they came on the road leading entlal vote are not ofllclally binding on the delegates. 16 ERP Nations Complete Charter Foreign ministers' deputies of the 10 Marshall plan na- tions act today on a charter setting up a European Or- ganization for Economic Coopera- tion. The ministers themselves will take up the document tomorrow. They appointed tho IB-member working committee that finished the charter yesterday after working since last month. An outline shows the organisation Is copied from thn United Nations in many administrative respects. These bodies are provided for: (1) A council ol' ministers from all countries taking part. The rule of apply on all major policy decisions nnd on membership us any from Spain, for example. (2) An executive committee of seven members elected for a year. (3) A genornl This would be headed by a socrol.iiry gen- eral and two assistants, chosen by tho council and responsible to it. Tho economic organization is to help carry out the European Recov- ery program approved by the United States Congress with a sturUiiK au- thorization for in aid Europe. to the barn, the plainUlf charges that Elmer started speeding with the tractor and drove over a chuck hole. It alleges In the complaint that Elmer was fully aware of this chuck hole. J-'rom his high perch on the hay load, Tlckfer wns thrown to the ground nnd' the entire load of hay fell on top of him. As a result his neck was broken and he was per- manently injured, lie Among his Injuries listed arc a crushed right shoulder nnd chest, Tlckfcr charges that he will never be able to earn his usual monthly sal- (Contlniicd on Page 20. Column 1.) DISTRICT COURT Manila. Friday Presi- dent Manuel A, Roxos is dead, Miilacunan palace announced curly today. FlKlilinR ap- peared to In: ciintiiiuini; in Cos- ta Klca's civil war despite re- purls frnm .Insr, tin; tnl, Unit reliKl-illolatril jirsine ni'tfolliilions are all com- pleted, Hiram, Ohio Harold K. Stassi'n told n. mock Republican iMiiivi'iitlon Hiram cnlluKC 
                            

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