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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 7, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER rttilltly mid IS COMING your new radio can Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 48. NO. 43 WINONA, MINNESOTA WEDNESDAY EVENING. APRIL 7, 1946 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES Smashing Stassen Victory Mrhinlilt I'lirmtul (VMi-llii Minnesotan Recoups After N. H. 7 GOP Hopefuls Bid in Tuesday's Nebraska Primary MndlMin, the nature, of his Wl.sroii.tln showing. Htnssen climbed up among the GDI' presl- tlrntlul lenders ugiiln utter having bren belled Into the vlce- prrMdentlul class by Uewey's six to two delegate victory over him In New Hampshire month. Thn Htiiwieii mirge Kiive milled col- fir lo lilr. rlulin-i cjC Imvlng won inii- jcirttlrn of the town nnd Maine Uu- publlcun delenutlon.'i In recent con- vention.-. In those two slutcs. Hut StiiKM-n fure.-i a now, und pcr- more ti'.M In next TucMla.v'.-i Nebraska priiiiiiry. he nix iitlier OOP including Dewcy utul will bid fur popular (Ulppurl. He will face Senator Robert A, Tuft of Ohio in that content for Iho time. Tuft winds up an In- ciiinpulun there induy. Dewry ttlr.'i to Nebraska today lo utiirt u iwo-duy tiuir tomorrow. Kliis- M-II Koes there Unnorrow, Dewey Hurl Dewry wii.'i Imdly hurl, by the WIs- n.n.Mii rc.MiIln especially beeuiwo of hi.-i III.M. iiilnule decl.'ilun cuinimlKn here neeileil u iniijorliy In the stutii where he keeps hl.-i residence lo iniike hhiiM'lf tlm florl of llireiit who Would bt el.'.ewhere. Ufwc.v lui.-. u chiince lo reeoliii will n Nebnl-iKu vlclnry. He IIIIN mild hi W pluyiiik1 Ihe string of prima- ries cr.dlnK with the May 21 Oregon vote, lie and Mlu.wn ui'o bulling hrad.i In tliut one. Hut a lot of went oul of thr Drwry riimpiilKii here, (U-splle ud- vunce admissions that he wouldn't tlo uny good In Wisconsin utul that ho citn win Iho nomination uny- Detailed Vote in Badger Election precincts of In Wisconsin, Inclucllnp; 516 In Milwaukee county, Klvc for Rc- publlcnn delegates at large: itohlcr iSlmmni McCarthy Olson Loiirnot (Hlimoni HMik ifltiviinoni 20H.D10 103.32.1 Kililv iHtummni I'ollptlp (MncArlhlirl y-.lmmi-rmun iMnrArlliuri (Inmlhiml IMni-Arthurl (MiirArtliiirl (Miii-Arthur) iMiicArtluir) (MiicArirmri IDpwry i (nitwny I in'j.sni 100.03' i l I'J, tit Wlnrniinlll (UfttrUil I'lml illnlrlr -SB? nf 237 prnclncU. t.vmt (Btdftscnl I'fl-lllllK (MacAriluiri lOrwiiyi (Prwcyi nt son prnclnr.ti. ll.in 'Ul.TJ'J l-'loin (MurArlhur) Mi-nry tMurArlhun Third ivirii-r Vi-rlv .hihunrm Wiiluli 11uIn iMnrArthuri (MnrArtliuri n.inn I0.7IM 7.2IH V.321I I'-ciiiriti of 2-M prptlncm. iMiicArlliuri (rUinini'iil ihlnirtji............. ilJiiwcyl I'lftli nf nun pi-pel (MiirArthnri II.7IIB wny. Most polltlclnn.t Ihnl Drwry lo.'it out beriui.se u many Republican votern had cle- cldrd the New York governor hnd hl.i chnnci> in Ifl-M somebody new ought to bo tried. Drfrnl Itln drfeul wu-i likened to thiit of the lute. Wendell Wlllklo In Wlllkle null the nice- utter Dewey walked oir with most ot Wisconsin's thut your. Tho fuel that Dowoy Kot thn sup- port Of 00 Now Yul'k doloKlitOH tcrdn.v, howovpr. kept him di.silnctly oul of Ihr Wlllklp Wlllklo hud no nuch bucklfn: to depend upon, rior did ho huvo clivlmod doli-ttiitofl In nny numbers. Wisconsin brmocrnt-t ploctcd n 24- voU' slnto nf drlt-Kiito.i for their nn- tlonul convontlon, Alt uro oxpoctod in mipport I'riviKU'tit Tnnniiti, Tho DrrnrxTiitlc votp was oxtroinoly llKht, incllcntliiK Hint many cros-tod over Into the. Uopiiblli'iiii flolcl for tho Krcnter f-xrltoinonl thoro, MnrArlliur TTir jioMlblllty WHS voiced by rtnp- rr.vtitiil-lvp Miller In Wiiihlnnlon Ihnl MacArlhUi- inlKhl qua. Mlllrr, who enmpixlKiiPd In Win- ronsln for HIP conorul, told prs; "MueArlhur rimy see fit, In vlnw of Knnniiti Mirnnillrkt nuiu iMlirArlhui'l lllxrli of Uln prpclncLv Knohlrr IMncArthurl Kenny IMncArthurl 17.IHI Tulvprafm............ iflliinmini Ifl.HIO Vun ['nil (mummm Tnnk (Dpwpyi 11.01' Mill lOwnyi KnetiUlin Hnvrnlh or :m prpr.lnntii. f.'liirKn iMurArlhun l.iilnl f.iinrlnn (Hlnnnrnl I.urillko iDnwoy) Mfyttr (Dcweyl llnnilrlrli M.313 I'MKhlh nt 21111 urnclncli. Dm If Mvlrhlnr flMlllll Van flint iMivrAriliuri iMiuiArlhur) (Uowoyi (Dnwny) I7.M1I) air. 13, U; Ninth or 378 prnclncln. fHtnunrn) 7.121 (Downy) Myhindrr (MonArUiur) Itulllln (MncArlhuri o.nao Two Mtnuflon men worn on thp vrrno of victory. In 32n of 403 tlii-y Una (107 ".307 voloii. Mnc ArUiur'a man followed with und Guarded Atomic Tests Under Way At Eniwetok Honolulu A top level American scientist-military team is evidently conducting n secret series of major atomic weapons tests at liwiliit'id, Ktiui-flcfl TCnlwotok atoll. Tim flrnt of tesl.H, to chart wiirtlnic u.-K-fi of.atomla fission, pro- jiilily already has been conducted. At tho current tests, the only wltiirwr.i arti n row expci't.s from nun United Stales. The urn military In pur- in llic tiu'i-, to to show how tho U, H. anniid LjtiitltiK lli'.vt. who hciid.i the na- ion-ox miiy UNO atomic mirrgy In Me.mil M.irArtlmr rlulis, Ifwui-it a war. Tho U. H. Atomic Energy com- dlati-mcnt here Illuming thn genor- mlxxlon haw warned everyone but r.howliiK on u light vote- In thn deli-KUtc Jloyl, who likely to on "1, UKACTJON Swift Finn O.K. of Russ Treaty Seen HrNlnkl, Hnlnitil Hcl.ilnkl political MiuiTr.i toduy predicted swift rutirU'iitlon of the new Kovlet- Klnnl.'.h mutual iild tn-iity. Thf-y rxiirrwcd the opinion Par- liament muiht give its approval by u few woll-Kcrucnud exports to keep iiwuy, It the end of next new trrnty wii.i Mk'ned lii.it. In cow, IVrslrtent Julio K. T'liuxtklvl Is ex- pected pill nil his personal pri'.i- behind u drive fur dinootli eon- rlii-slmi of the which most }''lnns regiirrl u.-i u good deal; They ronre.'i.iloiiH fniin Ihe Htlvilan.i nncl I hey kept I heir Ilido- Jientlcnce. In Mo-.cow, Ihe rinnl.ih deleKiitcN who neiioiiiiied the tri-uty diirlni: thr InM I wo week'., prepared fnr their nn.il orriclul dullev. and for H round of louMn mill spri'clie.t ut dinner nhi-n by 1'rlnm tonight. The opcnlm: clause of the new trcmy spt-ll-! out. ll'lnlund'.i territorial indrtK'iidem-t' If ellher colnitry fornes the object of It wiys Unit If either l.'i nlljicked by tlcnnuny or uuother allied vith her. l-'liiliind will (iKtit, Hut It tluvt l''innl.-ih forcen will evlclnnt to cui'dful ob- iiervei-M that ut luuNt two types of tCKt.i were pliinnocl. Tho first, pre- Hiimiibly, would bo tho use of atomic wurhi-uds on Kllldcd missiles, on short range, flights; Iho second, atomic bombs dropped from the ulr. MacArthur California Primary Petition Fails from thii four California counties in which petitions were filed to place General Douglas MucArthur's name In Iho Juno 1 presidential primary Hltowed today that they fulled lo olilaln tho retiiilriicl number ot nuttil'e.'i, With signatures necessary to get MucArthur's name on tho Re- publican ballot, Allen H, Worcester, who heuded thn movement con- l.rury to the generul'K expressed wlnlies, tiuUI Ihn drive hud fulled. Set Aside Order, Lewis Asks Court Action Taken As Clerk Readies Contempt Citation Washington John L. Lcwl.s tocliiy uskccl a fodcrnl court to throw out fin order requiring him to end the coal strike. The court set Monday for a hcarlnB on the plcn. JuclKf T. Alun GoklKborouBh, who fined Luwl.s 1'or contempt In u HMfl. strike, received Ihe petition und set Ihe date for the hearing. Goklsborough's office suld his uct.lon automatically holds up the effect of the temporary rcstrulntnij order iiKuliiKt the 24-day-old .strike. The .lu.stlcc clepurtmenl hud been plnnnliiK to ii.sk u contempt citation iiRalnst Lcwl.s und his United Mine Workers for iKnorlnR the order. The question whether the department would proceed, In view of GoUls- boroiiKh'.s action, wns not immedi- ately imuwered. Lewis' lawyers had n.skcd for a hearing Friday. But Colclsborough put It off unlll 0 a. m. Monday. On that day also GoldsborouRh .scheduled to hear this iiiitiit'K for u preliminary InJUiH-.llon to reiilaeii the re.straln- IIIK order, which expires Tuesday. The- Lewis inollon challenged the validity of the national emergency provision of the Tuft-Hartley ae.t, under which the untl-slrlku order ms l.-isued la.-it Saturiluy. "Violation of tho miners' right lo stop work and freedom from Involuntary sci-vitudc is explicit In tho court's direction that the union .shall order Iho miners to return to their the Lewis motion said. Court Ciin'l Cummlt It added: "Since the court may not legally commit tho union members em- ployed In bituminous coal fields to Involuntary .servitude, it may not legally result through Its mandatory order thiit defendants accomplish such status for tho union's members." The order by Justice Matthew P. McGulrc directed the union to end the strike, aind Lewis und mine operator.1! to negotiate .settlement of the pension dispute that touched off the walkout March 15. U S Senator Toscph McCarthy, left, of Wisconsin, Stassen presidential delegate, sits In as a group of collcasucs celebrate victory by Slasscn cJindlclatcs In Jils hcudrniivrlcr.s at mldniffht. Victor Johnson, nmnaRcr, Is in center, seated. ol' Stn..i.sen is held by nicihiird Smith, left, JclTer.son, Wls., and Loyal Eddy, right, Wauwatosa. (A.P. Wlrcplioto to Ihe Re- publican-Herald.) Draft Shelved; Solons Take Up Bigger Air Force Farce lead- ers won a now hcarliiK before Con- Tress today as demands mounted for an expanded nrmy to help guard this world peace. The Senate armed services com- mittee shunted aside plans to start writing legislation for a temporary draft and universal military train- ing until the air power dispute Is cleared up. To present the Air Force side. Sec- retary of Symington and his top military aides were called to testify icforc a closed mission. Chilli-man Curnny CR.-S. who has r.ot come out for n. larger all- Prospects of union-operator talks force, abandoned plans to dear the r to end the strike apparently vanished, however. The union attorneys' action came as Attorney General Clark appeared ready lo seek a conlumpt citation against Lewis and his striking min- ers. Tho number of workers Idle, duo directly or Indirectly to the 24-day- okl soft coal walkout, passed a half million today. IleacliiK the list wore John L. Lewis' -IDO.OOO soft coal miners. Out on a sympathy strike which started yesterday were more than eastern Pennsylvania anthracite miners. Bolh groups arc members of Iho United Mine Workers. About transportation work- ers, mainly railroaders, were Jobless because there was no coal to move. Lust Night's Moves Lewis and the operators exchanged carefully-worded letters yesterday and lust night. The mine owner represenlallves, bowing to Iho Mc- CHilru order, risked Lewis lo meel with them yesterday afternoon. Pre- viously they had refused lo bargain While Ihe miners were on strike. flully rejected the first Invitation, however, because Falrles.s and Humphrey were not to be there. But he countered with a suggestion that the operators "ad- Just your bargaining rcprcscnta- ;lon" and attend a meeting this afternoon, The operators retorted that Lewis was being "plainly evuslve" of the court mandate. They told the U M.W, chief "It Is not within your his ending public hearings last Saturday, but tho new flurry over ah- power led to tho deci- sion to call for fresh testimony, Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Wlnona and vicinity: Occaslonn.1 showers early tonight. Mostly cloudy lulu tonight. Thursday partly cloudy and cooler. Low tonight -10; high Thursday 00. Minnesota: Cloudy and colder with rain, sleet or snow north, changing to Know tonight. Thurs- day cloudy mid colrlc.'i-. Windy ni.'ar Liiko Superior this afternoon and early tonight. Wisconsin: Cloudy. Rain north and extreme east tonight, cooler west and central. Thursday mostly cloudy and cooler with some light. ruin or snow In extreme north, Colder Thursday night. LOCAL WKATHKR. Official observations for tho 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 04; minimum, 42; noon, precipitation, .'14; sun wM.s tonight at sun rises tomorrow at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Free. Russ Blame British For Air-Ramming Russians thrcwndlcd, was caused by British viola- Lhe blame for Monday's Soviet-jtlon of Allied regulations. The corn- British plane crash oil the British today. British officials said the Russian story was "palpably un- true." A Russian Investigating commis- sion charged the crash, in which 15 Judge Cowie Of La Crosse Is Re-elected By tile Associated FrcjiS A new circuit court Judge wns elected In the 17th Wisconsin cir- cuit Tuesday, Judge Robert S. Cowlc wns returned to ofllce In the sixth and Judge Kenneth S. White was returned without opposition in the eighth. In the 17th Jack- on and Junitiui county District Attorney Bruce Uclfuss wns lending Alfred Devos, of Ncillsvllle, G.-102. votes to with 90 precincts reporting out of 110. Bclfuss and Devos were seeking UK: bench vacated by the dentil of Juilne KiniM-y W. Crosby. The only Incumbent judge to be opposed apparently was well out ahead in the three-way race in the sixth Crosse, Mon- roe, Trempnilenu. and Vcrnon counties. Wll.h of the 147 pre- cincts counted, UK- inr.iimbcnt Judge, Robert S. Cowle of La Crosse, had mission said it occurred over a Rus- sian, airport in Berlin and that the British pilot failed to comply with four-power Allied Control council regulations by flying over the Soviet traffic zone. British officials issued no direct comment on the commission's report. They did deny a Moscow radio report which said the air collision was caused by a British airliner coming down out of a cloud and colliding with a Soviet lighter. The communist-run German Peo- ples council seemed headed for fail- ure today In efforts to get a national plebiscite 011 whether Germans want a unified, government. The council In the Russian zone of occupation has approved procedure for circulating petitions for a pleb- iscite among the German people. But the council, and its parent group, the German Peoples' con- gress, arc r.ot recognized in western Germany, thus foredooming thci votes to for Vcrnon county Judge Lincoln Neprud of Vlroqiia and for F. W, Crosby, a foviniM- La Crossi: county district jji-ovlnco or authority to choose the'LOS Angeles Bcmlcljl Chicago GO Denver Dns Molne.s (it) Dlllllth 30 Int. Falls Kansas City persons who represent the1 coal op orators In collective bargaining." Pilot Dies in S. D. Army Plane Crash liulTiilo, S. An Army plane crushed last night In Knute Maroldson's back yard. The pilot was killed. Officials of Weaver Army air Mulct at Rapid City, S. said he wan MII.-IUT Sci-Kuanl. William H. Co Mo of Cleveland, Tenn. Story Doesn't Match, Tenant Confesses Torch Murder Miami Mpls.-St. Paul New Orleans New York Seiitl.li! Phoenix 38 70 GO 78 62 84 G8 77 34 47 31 fill 32 31 02 47 71 44 72 4C 34 47 .03 .28 .10 T. .IB Returned to his bench without opposition was Judge Kenneth S. While, River Falls, eighth Buffalo, Dunn, Pepln, Pierce, and St. Croix counties. plan. Nourse Report May Ask Price Control, Rationing Tru- man called in his top economic" ad- viser today for a full review of pos- sible inflationary dangers in the na- tion's preparedness and foreign aid programs. But In Congress, Chairman Wol- cott (R.-Mlch.) of the House bank- ing committee served advance notice that it would be futile for the White House to ask now for revived curbs on the domestic economy. Mr. Truman arranged a meeting today with Dr. Edwin G. Nourse, chairman of his Council of Economic Advisers. The occasion was to receive the council's regular quarterly report. But Nourse has indicated the find- Ings will cover a wider range of than usual, including the probable impact of the rearmament moves under this country's newly proclaimed st.op-Russin. policy. Some members of Congress have been predicting that the council will recommend once more the enact- pose wage-price controls No Germany-wide vote could obtained, anyway, unless the four- power Allied Control council auth- orized it. The Russians stalked out of the council March 20 and It hasn't met since. I to consumers and to industry. UMT Wisest Way to Save Peace: Devers Milwaukee Jacob L. Devers tonight joined proponents of universal military training de- claring it the "wisest" means of safeguarding the nation. Speaking at an Army day dinner in Milwaukee, the chief of the Army's field forces said: "If. by UMT and a strong national defense, wo have even a small chance lo pre- serve our peace through a show of force, is it not the wisest. Indeed the only course, to grasp It with welcome 4-Year Jap ERP Urged by Army Washington The Army .OS1 wants a four-year Japanese recovery i program separate from the European .02 .11 KIVEIl IJUU.ISTIN A 50. year old tenant of Mrs, Richard P. Cody has admitted ho struck the need one-tlmo .'lOclulllo with his lint, then Ihnmt her Into a rurmicc. Tho sudden break In the case, t'eVritorliii: rir.il capital crime hero In -10 years, boundaries. No other nation wu.ijciime. whim William Drews broke named In the cliuise. I down under (iiio.stlonlnn by District The treiily c.tates that Uu.iMlui Attorney Edward Minor, Minor said can send troopi Into Finland In cii.ic Drinvs, who runted half of a two- tfn-o- apartment hou.io from Mrw. Cody, KIIIIIM (old u of killing Mrs. They f.'od.V Friday innrnlllK, tlicn going In Uii.-i.-ilii'l.hniiii'h wltii his own Wedding SaL- uith Koiiiiinlii mid lliinnnry urduy. rif ncKrr.'-.ion only by iniituul inrni. Tlil'i phru'ilm: iiiiiny reitnrdnl u rent roner.viloii. Uicro I.1, no provision. Charred remains Mrs. Cody were found In the furnace of her three story mansion Monday. The dl.sirlct attorney said a first degree murder warrant would be filed today. Drews said he married Mrs. Julia Smith, a widow with four children who occupied the apartment adjoin- ing Drews'. He told the police he gave his bride which he took from Mrs. Cody's purse, Minor said, but told his bride he made the money In a real cstale deal. Conflicting statements made lo brlclii and lo Ihe polled led to (ixlliill.-itlvo of Drew.-i by county mill stale, Minor said, even though the tenant prev- iously had not been considered a major suspect. Reel Wing Luke Cll.y Dum 4, T.W. 5. T.W. Dam 5A, T.W. Wlnona Dam C, Pool Dam (i, T.W. Dakota Dum Pool Dam 7, T.W. La Crosse Flood Stage 24-Hr. Stage Today Change 14. 13 10.4 in.o 10.-1 n.s n.ii o.o 10.1 Tributary Streams Chlppewa at Durand 5.2 Zumbro at Thellmaii H.4 Buffalo above Alma 2.4. Trempculenu at Dodge M Black at Ncillsvllle Bluck at Gulcsvllle LaCros.se at W. Salem 1.3 Root at Houston 0.0 n.l O.I 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 -1-0.1 0.0 -1-0.4 -j-0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 lilVER FORECAST (From Hastings to Guttcnbcrg) During the next 30 hours stages will remain nearly stationary from La Crosse to Lansing: elsewhere throughout the district them will bo a nlow full. Present rainfall will not effect tho .slugiM in thii nuihi channel und with normal rainfall the Mississippi will fall throughout the district for an Indefinite period. aid enterprise. It would cost a f ruction of the first year outlay In western Europe and would be under Army rather than civilian direction. William H. Draper, Jr., undersec- retary of tho Army, outlined the plan upon his return from Japan and Korea yesterday with a group of business men and olllclals who made a three-week survey of Amer- ican occupation problems. rtisip-'lifW'.- bulletins This new feature will begin in The Republican-Herald Monday. Legal questions of readers will be answered by Will Bernard, Los An- geles attorney, who out of the us- ually complex problems of people's rights and liabilities discusses the most interesting questions and gives tho lawyer's viewpoint. Is It a crime to thumb your nose at someone? For the legal answer sec the Reader's Courtroom Monday In THE REPUBLICAN-HERALD. Socialist Zeidler Tops Milwaukee Mayoral Contest Milwaukee A 35-year-old socialist will lake office in two weeks for a four-year term as mayor of Milwaukee. Youthful Frank P. Zeldlcr yester- day defeated his nonpurtlsan. op- ponent, Henry Keuss, votes to on the basis of unofficial; returns from -343 of the city's 400 prccints. The election of Zcidlcr, a. civil en- gineer and school board member, returns the city to the socialist ad- ministration which governed Mil- waukee from J91G to 1940. Strangely enough, it was Zeidlcr's older brother. Carl, who ended the socialist tenure by defeating Dan- iel Hoan. Carl Zeidler, strictly a nonpartisan, enlisted in the Navy and was lost at sea during the war. Loss May Put MacArthur Out of Race Minnesotan Seen Racking Up 20 of 27 By Jack Bell Milwaukee (IP) A smashing vic- tory by Harold E. Stasscn promis- ing him upwards of 20 of Wiscon- sin's 27 Q.O.P. national convention votes threatened today to push Gen- eral Douglas MncArthur out, of tbo presidential race. Stassen held fast to late-count some so big the result no longer was In doubt and some slim n. score of the 27 delegate le-sls Involved In yesterday's prt- iniiry. His candidates slaved off with a rally in mid-day tabulations a challenge of two MacArthur as- pirants to move into the circle of. seven delegates Sta-ssen's slate has led almost from the first. In contests to select the other 20 delegates two from each congres- sional Stasscn's men bud won six places and led in seven others for a total of 13. MucArthur's men led in the re- maining seven district contests. Two MacArthur candidates for- mer Governor Philip La and Secretary of State Fred Zim- merman were bidding for among tho .seven ill-large delegatrn, Nationally, the Republicans will niune, delegates altogether, the Democrats 1.234. A simple ma- jority is necessary for nomination at each convention. Most of the delegates uninstructcd, There are conflict- ing claims for their support. If Slasscn takes 20 in Wisconsin, the breakdown, as nearly as It can bo made, shows: Dcwey 106 Stasscn <7 Vandenberg 41 MacArthur 7 TJnlnstrucled 102 Besides New York's 90, Dewey lias ten in Oklahoma and six In New Hampshire. Stasscn has 20 from Wisconsin on the basis of In- complete returns, plus 2S In Min- nesota and two from New Hamp- shire. Senator Vandenbcrir CR.-Mlch.) gels his from his home state. While uninstructed they will go his wny if he wants them, Vandenberg has said he docs not want the nomination, Auditorium Bond Issue Defeated at La Crosse Crosse, referendum la Issue in bonds for a municipal iiudllorliim here Was defcnled In Tiie.sdiiy's elec- tion. The vole was against the bond Issue and for the proposal. House armed forces committee unani- mously approved today ;i resolu- tion calling for :i XJ. S. Air Force of 70 coinhlU. groups. f New president of the United Nations security council today called Jewish and Arab representatives for .1 Pal- estine truce conference today. St. elderly man, overcome by siiiolie, und a wom- an whiM-l chiilr Invalid were n.'N- r.uril early tuilny wlieu lire drove 40 persons from a three-story npartmcnt building and garage here. tenson Votes Municpal Liquor New Austin Mayor Named By The Associated Press Incumbents, including the mayor of Austin, fared badly In biennial municipal elections Tuesday, while Benson, dry since 1907, voted In a municipal liquor store. New Austin mayor is Merrill G. Rolfson, who won over T. B. Rockne, who has been mayor of Austin for three terms. The vote was Rolfson1 and Rockno Benson favored csl.nbllHhment of a municipal Ilo.uor store by a vote of 720 to 476. Blue Earth rejected a proposed municipal liquor store by 50 votes. I The total count was G32 for and G82 opposed. Two charter amendments met with favor in Wori.hinglon on the basis of unofficial returns. An amendment enabling the issuance Cairo Police Subdue Striking Male Nurses Cairo, Esypt Two thousand Cairo police, using machlncKuna and tear gas, subdued striking iurscK entrenched nn the roof of Egypt's largest hospital today. Advancing under a. shower of stones hurled by the strikers, the xillce seized 200 of them. Including 25 who were wounded by machine- gun bullets, at the Kosr El Elnl lospital. Smoke poured from the hospital building from flrex In the labom- .orlcs which police said were started iy the strikers. There were lundred patients in the hospital xt the time of the outburst. Tho 200 male nurses hnve been demanding higher pay. They seized control of the hospital this morn- ing. One of our fair congresswometx has a bill before the House to have our money printed in different col- ors. She thinks it would be pret- tier. I agree with her. I always thought Lincoln looked cuter with, a turquoise beard. There are other advantages. You wouldn't have to go to the movies. Money passes through your hands so fust, it would be ft techni- color movie. Each denomina- tion would hsve n different color. The dollar bill would be blade and blue. That's the perfect color. The way it takes a beating these days. Of course, the Kovcrnmcnt would have to calf In all the old bills. But that wouldn't require a special ef- fort. Just by waiting until March 15 Uncle Sam would get it all any- how. of noncallablc bonds received j A belter idea than colors would votes for to 283 opposed with five of six precincts in. The other amendment which would raise Wort.hington's bond limit, had a vote of 73C for and 238 agnlnst, after four of six precincts hud been hcnrci from. Hastings voters Installed an en- tire new city council and elected John Werth who had been uctlng mayor. be to have Betty arable's picture on each bill. You wouldn't misd the high prices then. What a pleasure it would be to kiss your money goodbye. But already lobbyists arc puttinc pressure on California wanl.s the color of the money lo be orange. Southerners want it gray. Elslcr wants it red And Tommy Manvillo wajits It blonde.   

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  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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