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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, March 30, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 30, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER FM IS COMING Be rare yonr new radio can receive It. Full Lenied Wire Newi Report of The Aiiocjated Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 48. NO. 36 'WINONA. MINNESOTA. TUESDAY EVENING. MARCH 30. 1946 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES House Opens ERP Door for Franco Lewis Bows To Federal Court Order Mine Head Appears Before Soft Coal Fact-Finding Board John L. Lewis bowed tt> a federal court or- der Mid appeared before u presi- dential board inquiring Into tho soft Lewis, flunked by more than 20 walked Into tho chum- brr npproxlmutely ten minutes be- fore tho mooting wwt to begin wt ycderui Judge Edward M. Cumin hud given thin choice; Either to uppeur at the hearings, which had rnfusetl to do voluntarily, or fiicn 11 possible heuvy tlno or Jull term for contempt of court. Currnn noted quickly after Lewis attorney raised the question of adequate tlmo to reply to tho sum- and challenged the constitu- tionality of tho Tuft-Hartley net. Onler Served The order win served on Lewis U.M.W. headquarters shortly after noon, reached otllco Just before 11 a. m. and deputy ur- rived a bit Inter, One murshu.1 re- mained In office for about 30 MB did not make, any announcement when lie left, Charles Wnrd. chief deputy mur- shnl, announced, however, that "served personally" nt a. m, Welley K. Hopkins, attorney for the chief of tho United Mine hud urgucd buruly ton when Currnn ruled. Lewis did not appear personally to ox- plain why he should not appear before the board of Inquiry. ntanket Exemption operating than 100 of track got n blanket exemp- tion today from the SB per cent cut which been ordered In conl- burnlnw freight At the sumo time, tho Interstate Commerce commission postponed until April thn effective date of thr reduction order so far It Iron ore truffle In tho Great region. Otherwise, tho general freight reduction will beeomo effective over the nation at midnight tonight. It was ordered by I.C.C. last wuok to conserve dwindling supplies of fuel In view of the work stoppiiKO In Uio conl Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS winona and vicinity Mostly cloudy with occasional light rain to- rilk'ht. Wednesday partly cloudy. Odder In the afternoon or at night. Low tonight 30; high Wednesday 40. Minnesota: Snow north und rain or snow south tonight with snow continuing In northeast Wednesday forenoon. Now snow accumulating three-five- Inches over most of northeast and extreme, north, Cold- er west tonight und west und ex- treme Wednesday. Rnthor windy. Wisconsin: Rain or snow north and rain south tonight changing to most sections by Wednesday morning and ending by Wednesday noon. Not quite so cold tonight, rolder Wednesday except llttlo chance close to Lnko Michigan, Windy. I.OCAI, WEATllKIl Official otwrvullons for tho 54 hours ending ul 13 in. today: Mnxlrnum. minimum, 23: noon, 43; precipitation, none: sun sots tonight at sun rises'tomorrow ftt TKMI'EIIATUIIKS III.SEWIIKKK Max. Mill. Proc. Chicago Denver IJrs Molnos Duhith International 1' Kansas City Mlurnl Mpls.-Ht. I'aul New Orleans New York 1'hoenlx Wushlnftlon (15 34 28 04 75 37 115 44 52 71 OS 27 37 :n 20 11 45 CO 2U 52 41 50 42 .04 .01 IlIVKIl IIUM.KT1N flood Stugo 24-Hr. Stago Today Change 14 P.7 n.i 11.1 H.I) It.O 11.11 P.4 11.0 fl.li ,C I- .1 Red Wing Ijike City Dnm 4. T.W. Dnm J. T.W, Dhin T.W. Winona Dam C, Pool Durn G. T.W. Dakota Dutn 7, Pool lJum 7. T.W. IM Crci.vie Trlliutnry Hlremns Chlppewiv ul Uiirand 0.4 y.umbro ut Tliellmuti 4.2 HufTtilo above Allnu 3.1 Illiick lit Nrlllslvlto 0.2 Jtlurk at Oulenvlllo TJV Crosse at W. Salem l.tl Itool ill Houston 11.11 ,'J Hiviiit (From to Tho stream flow Is Increasing ubove St. Paul which will result In u continued rlso from thut placo down to Dresbuch, From La Crowio down to dum 10, tho tendency will for u slight rlso within tho next 4ft hours but no Important chango In Indicated for the remainder of tho week. Tho upper Wisconsin will Kin falling and, wltli present cool vvcuther, also llii upper Chlppowu unU Mlnncsotn rivers, Exile to Russia For Wallace Party Urged Eisenhower Not Available for Draft, Says Army By Bell Washington Henry A. were Injured late yesterday when the fire truck, id was demolished, collided at a south Minneapolis Republican-Herald.) New Funds for Atomic Research Given 0. K. Ily Wllllnm V. Arlmruwt Wiifllilnjfton New funds for atomic weapons and research for military road work In Alaska, and for tho word war with Russia were okayed today by tho House appro- priations committee. It also approved now grants for relief hi Army-occupied countries mid for Veterans' administration personnel, Tho committee recommended a bill to moot shortages In funds previously votod for various agencies for tho year ending June HO. Tho bill Is scheduled to como bn- foro tho House for u vote tomorrow or Thursday. Amount. Cut-------------- Tho total Is below tho amount Pornldonl Truman had ask- ed, Most of tho cuts were In funds sought for the Maritime commission, thn department and the Air T'orcn clothing budget. Not u penny was out from tno asked by tho Atomic Energy commission, all of It con- tract authority for which Congress will put up tho actual cash Inter. The now authority boontH to tho amount tho commission will have at Its disposal this year, Tho committee gave Us okay to a request for In cash and In contract authority for construction of a road connect- ing tlowurd und Anchorage, In Al- aska, Voloo of Tho U. S, Information and Edu- cational Exchange program, which sponsors inn broadcasts to "Voice of America" _____......... Europe, was given Of the It asked for tho remaining three months of this fiscal year. Tho committee said It Is not sat- isfied with tho way tho program Is handled and said "a sound and offocllvo program" of combatting Soviet propaganda abroad should be worked out within tho framework of n law enacted early this year. An Air Force rotiue.it for 000 to buy now nnd distinctive uni- forms wiiii cut to The BommlLtco mild Ihlw should bo for a start. Shetsky Habeas Hearing Wednesday Judge null S. Carroll and tho Ilcnnepln county sheriff will bo among wit- nossiid when tho Rubin Bnctsky habniut corpus writ comes up for hearing tomorrow at Stillwaler. Judge Carroll was tho jurist who ficntenccd Shetsky following his con- viction on 11 murder charge. Kd Ilyivn, tho shcrllT, wius served with u 'subpoena yesturcluy, us was Eurlo Brown, hln prudeccssor in of- fice. Tho hearing Is slated before Washington County District Judge Alfred P. Stolberg, Shotsky, serving a life term for tho murder of Albert Schneider, Minneapolis labor leader, was tried and sentenced In absentia when he disappeared September 23, 1945 vitlurlnR his trial hero. Ho was cap- "''lured In California last year and taken immediately to .Stillwater prison. Through Curl W, Cummins and William C, Oroen. Shotsky lost work brought u writ socking his freedom on tho grounds that the mHIro "In absontlu" trial and sen- tencing was Illegal, Railroads Accept Wage Unions Undecided Baruch, Wilson nation's rail- roads aru ready to grant a wage in- crease of cents an hour to engineers, firemen and switchmen, as recommended by President Truman's fuct-flnding board. But tho rail brotherhoods repre- senting tho workers haven't decided whether they will accept the pay hike. Tho unions, who asked for a 30 per cent wage boost, expressed disappointment over tho board's findings. Tho general chairmen of the unions will meet in Cleveland next Monday to act 'on tho board's rec- arc not man- datory. If they reject the pay boost there will bo no utrike immediately. Un- der tho Railway Labor act the unions aro required to continue ut work for a 30-day period imdlng April 20 before leaving tholr Jobs. Tomorrow the three unions' wages and rules committee will meet In Cleveland to start a study of the board's rocommundatlons. Tho pro- also Include changes In work- Ing rules. The carriers, announcing accep- tance of tho recommendations, esti- mated the wage increase and the cost of 37 changes In working mien, would add a year to the railroads' operating cost. Europe Needs More Than ERP, Says State Aide Milwaukee (A1) Wlllard L. Thorp, assistant secretary of state, said today the European Recovery program alone might 'fail to halt communism's spread. But unless there is improvement In tho economic llfn of the IB Mar- shall plan nations, hi: said, thoy aro sum to fall victims to "some form of Thorp. Secretary of State Mar- shall's chief economic aide, did not siiy what further American help might bo required. But In Wash- ington, administration officials have been talking about tho possible need for a revived lend-lease program to supply arms to these 10 nations. Thorp, in an address prepared for Milwaukee's second conference of the United Nations, termed the recovery program "a great coopcra- tlvo liffort ot morn than 400 million people." He said tho wen torn Euro- pean countries already aro taking positive steps to make it work. "I should not want to promise that the European Recovery plan will prevent the spread of commun- he said. "But I can assure you that tho failure of the European economies to improve will lead to some form of Italy Paid Million for Prisoners' Work authorities handed Italy's treasury ministry a check today In payment for work by Italian prlsonent-oi- war In cooperation with U. S. armed forces. U.S.-Financed German Spy Ring At Work in Russ Charge nald today a Qurmiiii npy ring Ilnancod by Amer- ican military Intolllgonco and Ger- man industrialists is working In the Soviet occupation zone of Germany. Tho Communlnt party newspaper quoted u iipoclal corrcnpondont from Horllu as saying tho group was headed In Germany by one Oorhardt Plnkort. Priivdn Identified PInkcrt a former Wohrmacht colonel and former commundor of a regiment In tho lirnndonlHirR dlvliilon. Ccirnplotn opitriitlonii arc directed from Munich by a Colonel General lloldor, tho paper said, i Pruvda said Plnlcert gave full de- tails of tlio ring's operation, and Inflation Dangers Pointed Up by Ily Marvin I- Arrinvmiiltli Washington OPA's rest- less ghost came back to the halls of Congress today as senators link- ed inflation clangers to phms for bid military spending. Talk of the possibility of reviving wage-price controls, rationing and other curbs on the domestic eco- nomy was touched off by Bernard M. Baruch. The 77-year-old adviser to presi- dents shook the gathering dust from the issue by declaring that the cost of America's stop-Russia drive win have a "tremendous Impact" on prices and living conditions at home. The talk got another push from Charles JS. Wilson, president of Gen- eral Electric Company and former vice-chairman of the War Produc- tion board. Wilson said the cost of rearma- ment, a temporary draft and univer- sal military training could pinch to a point whL-re wartime controls would bo necessary whether there Is shooting or not. Wilson and Baruch expressed their views yc.stnrduy to the Suniito arm- Wallace came back to the capital today, hard on the heels of Pre- sident Truman's thinly veiled sug- gestion that he take his whole third party movement to Russia. At the same time nntl-Trumnn Democrats refused to accept as flmil an official Army declaration that General Dwlght D. Eisenhower Is no more available to them than to the Republicans. And on tliu other side of tho political funcu, rc'p'irts up Lhul Governor Thomiitt K. Dewey and Senator Robert A. Taft have agreed to gang up against Harold E. Stasscn's bid for Maine's 13 G. O. P, convention votes. These were tho developments, one at a time: Mr. Truman, who less than two weeks HBO denounced "Henry liioc nnd his In a. St. Patrick's clay speech, took another poke at his ousted cabinet officer and presidential rival. The setting this time was a dinner meeting of Greek-Americans, the order of Alirpa. Rocky Mniintiiin.s The President was introduced by Dean Alfange of New York who told the audience that Wallace and his followers ought to go to the Rocky mountains "in the role of the Greek guerrillas." Then, Alfar.ge continued, Premier Stalin might recognize the former vice-president as "the leader of the free government of the United States." "The denn has stolen my Mr. Truman said In Ills extempor- aneous remarks. "I wns going to tell you that the Greeks had a Henry Wallace. I was going to tell you that tho Greeks had a statesman an orator, a demagogue. They had the greatest demagogue of all times, Alclbiades." But, the .chief executive con- tinued, "if imitators of that ancient Griiuk coiifiuiTor wiinl; to NCO liber- ties subverted, I suggest that they go not to the Rocky mountains that's fine country out there. He ought to go to the country he loves so well v in wo j MI-V od HorvlccM uommlttoi.'. which In noarlng n decision on TJMT and the draft revival asked by President Truman. MacArthur Men Spend in Wisconsin Madison, WIN. Organiza- tions .supporting Guncral Douglas MacArthur for president on the Re- publican ticket have spent in the Wisconsin delegate campaign, according to preliminary reports filed with the secretary of state. Two groups supporting Governor Thomas E. Dewcy reported .spending and one Harold Stassen com- mittee reported in expendi- tures. Kansas City Votes on Mayor and Council Kansas City Kansas City votes today for city officials to serve for the next three years. The balloting marks the fourth test ul. the polls for the nonpartl- san administration that won con- trol with tho downfall of the Tom Pcndcrga.tt organization in 1040. A mayor, eight councllmen and three municipal Judges arc to bo elected. and them against his own country If that's tho wny he As for Eisenhower and the boom among some southern and northern Democrats to promote him as a substitute candidate for Mr. Truman the Army's top press relations off- icer, Ma tor General Floyd L. Parks, sit Id all this maneuvering has had no cfi'ect upon the retired chief of staff. Permitting his name to be used rather than Insisting upon anony- mlly as an "Elsenhower Parks declared In a statement thnt "under no conceivable circum- stances" will the five stnr general yield to a Democratic draft. In the Republican arena, Wash- ington politicians close to the situa- tion said nn undercover fight over the complexion of Maine's delegation to the G. O. P. national convention probably will break into the open later this week. The state Republican convention Is due to meet Thursday and Fri- day to pick 13 dulcgntes to tliu Philadelphia presidential nominating meeting. Traditionally the slate would go uninstructcd. But politicians here said Dewcy and Taft have reached a silent agreement to work for a delegation would be about evenly divided Printers' Union to Renew Negotiations llMnmniul. re- newal of contract negotiations de- signed to settle strikes of A.F.L. printers against several of the na- tion's newspapers appeared certain The printers arc not expected to return to work during tho new con- tract negotiations, ll union spokes- man said. The I.T.TJ. announcement yester- day followed a conference of union attorneys nnd officials nnd counsel traDhlciil union sold new cont.rnctslfor the National Labor Relations arc to be offered publishers of the [board In the chambers of Federal struck newspapers by all striking Luther M. Swygert. local unions and will comply with a The conference was held after federal court order. This will Swygert had refused to stay todny. Tho A.V.L. International Typo- fewer union demands. There was no immediate com- ment from publishers of the struck newspapers on the I.T.U.'s an- nouncement of its plan to end the current work stoppages. Strikes arc In progress In at least eight cities. The biggest is in Chicago where printers struck last November 24 against the city's five major dailies. enforcement of an injunction he is- sued Saturday forbidding the I.T.XJ. from causing printers' strikes that violate the Tart-Hartley law. Union attorneys said they planned no im- mediate appeal of the Injunction. The injunction will be in effect until the NLRB rules on the govern- ment's charges that the union vio- lated tho Taft-Hartlcy act. Italian Campaign Marred by Violence party leaders, disturbed by two political killings in the leftist north yesterday, arranged to meet tomorrow to seek remedies for a rash of violence which threat- ens their campaign truce. Communist Umberto Tcn-achlnl, president of the constituent assem- bly, who arranged the truce In an effort to bar bloodshed in the cam- paign for the vital April 18 elections, called the meeting. Stave-swinging unemployed, some 7.000 strong, marched through the streets of Milan today, demanding work and relief payments. Police stood by anxiously but there was no violence. The situation was tense as a result of the slaying of two communists yesterday at Samglia, 25 miles west of Milan, the leftist stronghold of the north. Campaigners were maul- ed, beaten, pelted with over-ripe fruit and thrown from platforms at other points In the north. There was street lighting in Burl, in the south, and one man was stabbed. Both leftists and rightists were targets of tho violence in tho north. There were predictions the Inci- dents may set off trouble today. Newspaper accounts said the two communists were shot when they got Into an argument with spectators during n march from one village to another. Badger Highway Bids Opened Madison, bids for 14 highway improvement Jobs, to- taling approximately were opened by the state highway com- mission today. They include the following: Buffalo 37, 8.343 miles; A. Guthrie and Company, St. Paul, grading and bi- tuminous surfacing. Trempcaleau county U. S. S3, Galesvllle-Frenchvllle road, Wau- sau Construction Qompany, bridge. Arab Mother Names Sons Appropriately Jerusalem The Arab mother of twin boys born yes- terday In the Damascus gate neighborhood, which bristles with Raid today they have been named "Brcn" and "Tom- my.1 Police, Pickets Skirmish in N.Y. Exchange Strike New York Violence broke out In the stock and curb exchange strikes today as waves of pickets rushed police at the entrance to the New York Stock exchange. Men were knocked down, women screamed, some police were thrown to the sidewalk. One detective was picked up, his head bleeding. Uniformed police swung clubs im calls were sent for ambulances, po lice emergency squads and patrol wagons. The skirmish began Just before 8 o'clock as the pickets lined up .be- fore the exchanges on the second day of the strikes in the lieort of tho world financial center. Within six minutes the disturb' unco WOK ended and many persons were back on the sidewalk, their clothing torn. Just before the flareup, a woman Identified by police a.s Claire John- son. of tho Bronx, was charged with disorderly conduct when she attempted to force her way into a picket line that was restricted In number. About 100 police were on duty at the exchanges today. The same num- ber had been there yesterday, the first day of the strike, when picket- ing was noisy but orderly and the market conducted business as usual with brokers acting as messengers and clerks. Police had difficulty removing about 50 men and. three women from outside the -stock exchange to patrol wagons after the disurbancc as the men locked arms. 'Ninotchka' Showing in Rome by Rome The foreign office disclosed today that Russia has made formal protest against show- ing in Rome theaters of the Ameri- can motion picture, a prewar film which giggles nt com- munism. A spokesman said Ambassador Mikhail Kostylev's note of protest was delivered Saturday. The spokes- man said a reply is under study. The picture, starring Greta Oarbo, is playing to good crowds in five Rome theaters. Used car dealers are now going into the trinket business. You get more gadgets on your car these days than on a. quiz show. I think it's getting out of hand Some -------------------cars have so many extras they have to put the grill- work on the in- side. For you can gel, all the accessories you wont In fact, they might even throw In the car. One company is coming out with a car that's really ultra modern. ___Wlicn you push llopo u button a scien- tist comer, out of the glove com- pnrtmont and explains what the gadget Is for. It's so swanky that when you push a button it pushes you buck. Of course, in California, with all .said, "It is u Fascist organization' of the mountains one of the better (which) receives largo sums money" each month. Pravdn said the entire organiza- tion Is made up of former German officers and has as its tank among others, "tho establishment of con- tact with German agents left In a scries of countries during the war and with this purpose Intends to use such countries as Auiitrla and swncl- on, through which thcro Is the pos- sibility to conduct such Intelligence work." of extras is the hill-holder.. This is designed so that when you find a hill, you crin hold it Before somebody tears it clown and throws up n row of prefabricated houses. They 'also have special fog lights for California. They not only pierce the Jog They sunburn the you KO over them. The new curs savo, HO much time. rickets Ami Police sou file outside tho New York Stock Exchange here today as violence out In the 'trlke of employes against the Stock Exchange and the New York Curb Exchange. (A.P. WlrcphoU> Republican-Herald.) Proposal O.K.'d by 149-52 Vote Spain Must Agree To Join European Co-op Aid Program Wiwhlnrton The Houaa voted 149 to 52 today to Invite Fran- co Spain into the for- eign aid program. The foreign affairs committee had agreed to include Spain. But Rep- resentative Vorys in charge of the aid bill, said the State department is against it. And whether the Senate will go along Is another question. In any event. Spain could get in on the program only if she ngrccd like other participating countries to Join in a. European recovery pro- gram, of cooperation and self help. Spain Eligible Spain now is specifically named as eligible to qualify under the bill before thn House. Eastern European nations arc not. The door IK open for Russia and her satellite nations to come In un- der the same terms as Spain, by agreeing to terms of the program. Representative Hand (R.-N. J.> immediately offered an amendment (o limit the European program to the 16 nations which have signed up already to work together toward an economic comeback. Hand's amendment was quickly defeated. It would have stricken out the section mentioning Spain. It also would have canceled out In the same section a provision allow- ing Russia and her satellite na- tions to come In If they agree to play ball. Turn Down Amendment By turning down Hand's amend- ment, the House left the door open for any nation, whether named or not, to come In under the act by agreeing to terms of the recovery program. x Specific inclusion of Spain would have financial implications. The way the program Is set up, the Eu- ropean program would be distribut- ed among 10 nations. Addition of Spain would rcqulra some research into Spanish needs and requirements. And that in turn could result either in increasing total size of the Europtfan program or spreading the money among 17 Instead of 10 countries. Aid for China, economic and mili- tary, was the question before Senate. The foreign affairs com- mittee brought to the floor for ac- tion n. bill calling for worth of economic aid for 12 months, plus for any- thing the Chinese government wants. Injunctions Asked By South St. Paul Packing Plants South St. Paul (IP) Massed pickets continued their march about packing plants here today on the eve of a court hearing Wednesday on an injunction sought by three firms. Armour, Swift nnd Cudnhy com- panies are seeking the writ In ef- forts to gain free entrance to and exit from their plants. A restrain- ing order against pickets represent- ing- the striking C.I.O. United Packinghouse Workers was Issued ten days ago by Judge W. A, Schultz at Hastings. But Sheriff Norman Dieter of Dakota county Informed Governor Luther Youngdohl last week he hod not sufficient law enforcement manpower to enforce the order. Apiin Monday, the sheriff re- ported, pickets were massed so solidly some 300 nonstrlklng office workers ivcrc unable to gain entry to their desks. Bulletins Manila. Forty-four Phil- conxlabularymcn. en- trenched in their re- funed to mirrcndcr today after a. mutiny in which three were nlatn. An fduca- 'tor told senators today United SUtcn should quit try- ing to outmatch Russia in mann- ed men under arms. Inntcad. Alonro F. Myrw, New York uni- versity profcwior, urced an In- creaxn in air powrr and morn for (tclrntlflc rracarch and development of lie also called for greater Mip- port for the United for SI, to start a work- relief program for the Navajo and Hopl Indians were denied. today by the House appropria- tions committee. Bogota, Colombia W) American agreed nt a. preliminary session today that that the ninth international conference of American could and xvoitlrt "fore Ifn innplrcd Hubverslve acUyitlea" In the Western hemisphere.   

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