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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, February 19, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 19, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                w FATHER IS COMING ntre your new radio can Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Frew Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 48. NO. 2 WINONA. MINNESOTA. THURSDAY EVENING. FEBRUARY 19. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES Heavy Winds Whip State, Cold Returns Visibility Distress Sign Waved by Democrats Wallace Drive, Rift With South Worries Party Wanhlnrlnn The Democra- tic national committee rulni'd nr out and out dmirMui itlKiml today in Uw facr of Jlniry A. Wlillnot third tmrty clrlviv CTinlrniuii J. Howard Mr.tlralt Mid he Wallace will he curi accompllnh nothing but "the defeat, cit thr Democratic ty'n program of practical llbonilltim in McCirnth for abandonment of tho Wallaco cnrn- piiiirn in a radio speech Wodncndliy The nddroiw followed MoOruth'i Trunk nUmlwUon thut tho victory of Good Sign r, Har- old K. HtiMiwn. Itrpiihllcan presidential candidate, Inter- the, Nrw York American party victory of Turaday. a ftxxl omen for the Kepub- Jtcan party. Thr victory hy the Henry Wal- lace-barked ranitlclutt, Indlcatm, SUMM-n wild, that the working voUrn held by I'rraldrnt Koone.- are turnlnK from the Demo- party. "The Jtepubllenn parly only to prewnt a progreiwlve. humanitarian proitrum to win a peroentiifti of thin labor he K Wallner-bnckrd enndlduto In New York congrrwlonal flection In a big clangor Mgn for the In the Nrw York race, Leo running an American Labor Dtvrty candidate, with Wallace's Mlp- port. upwt Democrat Karl 1'roppor tn a wldo muruln. To Hun In Wallnca, on a npeech-maklnK tour of the South, (tavo no Indication that he to heod nny call to "come home, all U announced ivt Miami Beach that nupportum have ob- tained KlKimturcB on ft tlbn to put namo on tho pri- mary election ballot In California rranklln D, Roosevelt carried tho by only about votes la 1944. Meanwhile tho row between niv tlonal Democratic leaders nnd piirty members In the "wild nouth" flared up again in Wwihlntflon, A group of southerners canceled their re.vrvatlonn for tho big a-plate Jeffernon-Jrickiion dinners tonight where prominent Domocrata will rally around Prentdent Truman. The issue wim one which hail brought a chorus of rebel yells from south of tho Mason-Dlxon line In recent weeks: The color lino. Mrs. Olln D. Johnston, wlfn of the south Carolina senator, naif! decided not to attend the dinner "because I might bo iieutcd nuxt, to a Alit for Wallace She wild her party or 45 hud dwindled to around 30 because some of r.hp others frit the snrno way. McOrnth told reporters a or morn Neicroes planucd to (iltoiul the two dinners hero. Ho snld lie could not order any sPKrccuUon McOrutli showed deep concern ovrr the Wnllnce threat In his radio adrtrew. He sold hn thinks Wnllfice hlm.vlf Is "sincere" enough, but added "The fact that the loudest ftp- plausp for llt-nry Wallucr comes from communists, communist fellow travelers nnd reactionary Republi- cans cKuses me to believe thut tho bulk of Henry Wallace's support Is pomlng from those, whoso basic al- legiance is not to tho American wuy of life." Raised for Kenny Fund Minneapolis The Mlnno- apolis arm rulsrct or 70 per cent of IU cuiotii In thn lfl'17 fiuirl rumpalgn the Ulster ntwih foundnlloii. John V. McOovern, chairman for the district, said had been contributed In Henneplti county and the balance came from 70 county volunteer committees In parts of Wisconsin. North and Kouth DoVtota. MrOovrrn snld Kmifllyohl county led out.itnln areas with contribu- tions of or 317 per cent of Its quoU of Mrs. Iviir Palm of Kandiyohl led thn drive. Cot- tori wood county, led by Ilvissell Henry. Wlndom, reported raising or :ilD per rent of its quota. McOovern reported. 12 Minnesota counties which sutiyrlbed 200 per cent or more of assigned goals were Chlppewa, Chi- saeti. Ocxlge, I''arlbault. Cloodhile. Cirant. U-sueur. Mower. Hlliley, Wntonwnn, Wllkln and Yi-llow Medicine. St. Cloud to Vote on School Bonds St. Cloud, A bond Issllr of to flnnncn the construction of two new grade schools In St. Cloud will be submitted to the vot- ers, it. was decided Ttic.icluy at n special meeting of the board of edu- cation. There will be u new Washington achool and a new Lincoln action! If the bonds are approved by tho vot- ers, The board set the bond cloc- tlon duto for March 1U. I '-j -'jMii- nnd Ar- Man Locates Antarctic arcn Into which Great Britain Kcntlnii arn sending warships nil Chile established two military bases In Antarctica. BritUh move Is to nuppori Ilrltlnh governor on Palk- and Is ancls In iho area. Both Argentina and Chile have mado terrl- torlill claims In tho area which Includes 'ho South Georgia, South Orkney and South Shetland Island groups. Wlrcphoto to Tho nppiibllcari-llnruld.) ____________.____________________ Hantlago. Chllr Chilean Primldunt Qubrlol aonmlON Vidula hunducl homu today aftor formally wltiiiK up U'O military bases in disputed Antarctic hn called a "land ot tomorrow." Tho bases were established at Chilean weather stations In dcllancc of lonK-tlmo British claims, recent- ly rcltnrntncl, Gonznlcit InniKtliratoc! tho firtit on Tuesday at tho weather station nt Port SovnrolKiity on Greenwich la- land In tho tloulh Shullands. KOino MO mlloK nouth of tho southorn tip of South America. JIo dedicated tho nccond Wcclnes- duy at another woather ulatlon, ml'lun to thn south, on u peninsula of tint Antarctic continent known to Chlln nn OlIlKKlnn land and to Groat Itrltatn as Grahnmlitnd. Wcr- nardo OIllKKlnH. ft Chilean patriot of Irish extraction, the first chlof of state of independent Chile. Dispatches to this Chilean capi- tal told of tho ceremony. Tho Cor- votto Covadongn anchored among Icobwrgs. Tho jjrc.ildcnt wont ashore with other olllclals, 20 army cadota, 20 mldHhipmun and a navy band. Chllo, Argentina and Great Brit- ain hold overlapping claims to plc- Khupocl sections of Antarctica. Woman Buries Unrelated Man month ago Alice D. Bowcn received word her lather. James, 72, had died at Bowton Stale hospital. Hho arranged for tho funeral. Many friends attended the wako. Tho body was burled In a local comotory. Sho received word from tho hos- pital Wednesday that thoro had 3oon a wrong had burlod tho body of James Bow- en, 116, a member of another unre- lated family. Dr. Walter E. Barton, hospital su- perintendent, said tho fact that Ihoro was a similarity In tho gen- eral appearance of tho men appar- ently caused tho mistake. Late Bulletins Ml Alvln N. (Ho) vrlflrnn atlilrtlo cllrro- tor and foot hull conch at Incll- lum iinlveriilty, today hired linuil couch anil iriinrral mun- of tlin Detroit LloiiH of tho National Courier M'. Dlmltrov. r.xltcil IlulRurliin poli- tical Iriulor, until todny "Amurl- cnn trultorn" itro being trained rlirht now In HuHsIa for eventual duty In tlilH country, Dlmltrov nl.io lolrt 11 oom- inltlor: "America In eommimlitt target No, lluyonnti. N. J. An explosion In a Krcaitn mlxInK jilitnl of tlm Tldn Watnr unolntrd Oil C'mnnnny rookoil Nrw York hnrhor today tint rrMiltliiK flnmpH wrrn rxtln- In-Torn rniiclilntf liny of thn rxtriiMvn petroleum works' on the waterfront. No nuMiulllcN we i'n reported. l.wkn Success The United Nations Illtln warned today "Korwi roiiy Mow up" If the, U. N. fulls to unite HID north anil Noutli. The wiim- liiK wax niiulc by K. I'. N. Mnnon of India, chairman of the U. N. Korean ml.tikm. I'rlneeton. N, John Ili'Kiin, mid Harold Siil- jihrn, 2t! WITH killed anil three lit hers Injured today UK u reniilt of a xtoniKO tiink failure, which flooded rrlnimtnii unl- verxll.v'x Frlc.k chumlHlrv lab- oratory with hydrogen MUlflde. Two Little, Too Late Cry Heard On China Aid Wmihlnglon President Tru- man's plan to ftU'o China a economic shot In tho arm raised a cry of too mtlo nnd too lalo In Congro.iK today. Senator Stylos Bridges (R.-N. H.) said the civil strife In China has .point p" will bo chough. pa nomic "Wo should turnUh military sup- plies to enable tho nationalist government (of Chiang Kai-shek) to line tho equipment we have al- ready given tho Now Hamp- shire lawmaker told a reporter. He added: "The expenditure of many billion dollars to halt tho spread of com- munist forces In Europe makes lit- tle sense If nt the name time this government allows China to go to tho communists by default." Bridges la chairman of the Sen- ate appropriations committee which will have a big say over how much money China is to get and how it Is to be spent. However, tho first olTlcIal look at Iho Chinese aid program is shap- ing up on the other side of the Capitol. The House foreign affairs com- mittee announced that It will start hearings on tho subject Friday. The committee i.s still working on Euro- pean recovery legislation, but plans to start writing a foreign aid bill or bills, by March 2. sn n The Senate foreign relations com- mittee has Just: finished work on a Marshall plan meas- ure for Europe. But there was no Immediate word when it will take up the China matter. Mr. Truman confined his message to the economic aspects of China's troubles. He asked no military help He suggested In loans or gifts to finance such Imports as cereals, cotton, petroleum, fertilizer tobacco, medicines and coal. The remaining would be spent for a "few selected recon- struction projects." Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and Cold wave tonight with 'temperatures falling steadily to near five below in tho city and ten below in tho country by Friday morning. Occasional flur- ries of snow tonight, clearing Fri- day. High Friday 18. Minnesota Cold wave tonight with temperature falling to near 20 bolow north and ten below south portion by Friday morning. Clear- Ing with diminishing winds tonight. Friday fall' and cold, Wisconsin Cold wavo tonight with temperature falling, to zero southeast and 20 below northwest portion by Friday morning, Clearing with slowly diminishing wlndu to- night. Friday fair and cold, LOCAL WEATHER Omclttl observations for the 24 hours muling at, 12 m. today: Maximum, -17; minimum, 15: noon, ID; precipitation, none; sun nets to- night at sun rises tomorrow "TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Prca Chicago 55 -15 Denvor 02 35 Dos Molr.OS 55 43 Duluth 27 20 .03 International Falls 50 4 ,11 Los Angeles 60 40 Miami 74 fl Paul 20 24 Trace Now Orleans HO 63 Now York 33 Seattle SI 3-1 Phoenix '15 Washington 70 30 Edmonton 2f) -20 Winnipeg 8 -10 Fire Destroys Two Chaska, Minn., Firms Damages Estimated At Over Wind Whips Blazes Chasten, Chaska bunlnosA buildings wcrn destroyed by fli'o t.odiiy before, tho wan brought, muliir conl.ro! by volun- teer llro fightcm from three towns No one was Injurod. Davu Smith, editor of the Chaska Humid, Haid the los.i was in excess of The Humes were brought under control about fl a. hours after they broke out In the shoe Hlore. This Const-to-Coast store and the one-ntory KranU store were destroyed. The Coast- to-Coast store Is owned by Oliver Dnhlcn who is on a honeymoon trip to the went. Fire departments from Carver nnd Shakopec joined with Chaska firemen to keep the fire from spreading to the nearby Melslcr llq-i uor store and Markers clothing store. A 40-mile northwest wind handicapped them. Families living above the Coast- to-Coast store fled before the fire spread to their apartments. Swaniville, Minn., Grain Elevator Burns Swanvlllc, Minn. An ele- vator filled with grain, seed, feeds and flour wa.s destroyed by lire heru early today. Tho blaze which swept the eleva- tor operated by Joe Gesscl was brought under control by volun- teer firemen after It had threaten- "Volunteer FiremenFrom throe nearby towns battled flames that destroyed two stores and caused damage at Chaska, today. (A.P. Wlrcphoto to The cd tho entire town. Gcsscll said seed alono in the elevator was worth more than 000, but that an estimate, of tho total Ions had not been made. Swanvlllo IH a town of about 800 located 18 miles west of Little Falls. Tho llro was discovered about a. m. High nort.hwnat winds spread it rapidly. Embers were blown several blocks and Ignited nwnlngs on store buildings. R.A.A.F. Bomber Crashes, 16 Of Crew Killed Brisbane, Royal Australian air force Lincoln bomber crashed at Amberlcy, Queensland, airport Wednesday night, killing 16 R.A.A.F. crewmen. The ship was on a training flight fromLaverton, near Melbourne. It was attempting to make n landing at the airport, which is about 30 miles from Bris- bane. Rugs-Hungarian Pact Signed Moscow Russia has forged the last link In a chain of treaties Intended as a barrier against' the "imperialist Foreign Minis- ter V. M, Molotov announced Wed- nesday night. Molotov spoke after the signing of a Soviet-Hungarian friendship and mutual assistance treaty. Russia now has. he said, "pacts of friendship and mutual assist- ance with all states on its western the Black sea to the Death of Yemen King Confirmed Aden, Aden The govern- ment of Yeman confirmed in a telegram today that Its king, Zaida Imam Yahya, is dead. He was 82. Yeman Is nn expanse of square miles, mainly desert. It has inhabitants. A four-pamteniror combination auto iinil airplane lion been pro- duced by Consolidated Vultce In San Dletfo, where It la now un- dergoing taxi tests. Now when you look up In the nky you won't be able to tell whether it's a bird, Gor- don, or one of thwie new con- These new autos are irolnif to have three speeds First Second And Htratosphere here 1 come. Of oourHC, out here In Cali- fornia this Is nothing new. Cars have been flying for yearn. Tho Insurance companies arc doing a terrific bUNlnerui though I pawed by one iiliioe anil four eagles wero trying to get accident pollclen. And when you go inlo the gas Station the attendant will prob- ably ask, "Oil Water GBN The arc all confiiHcd. Now they don't know whether to carry roller skates or para- chute. A friend of mine has one of these new but he had n accident. He forgot whom ho was anil stepped out to look at the tires. I took my girl for a spin and she told me I wan out of thin world. Of course. She wiui rending tlic speedometer at tho time. Rochester Union Head's Foes Delay Election Rochester, of Gunhlld BJorklund, business agent of local S15, Public Workers Union, C.I.O, today had won their move In Ihulr attempt to ou.st her from olllce. At a union meeting Wednesday night, they succeeded in having an election postponed to allow time to prepare a slate of rival candidates for the post. Miss BJorkJuud previ- ously had been nominated lor re- election without opposition. Her opponents, led by Adolph Tuhy, had accused her of being a member ot the communist party. At Wednesday night's meeting, some members said Miss BJork- lund declared: "Okay, If you want to know, I am a communist." .The union members said her statement followed reading of a let- ter in which t.hft charge was made. Reached ac her .home following the meeting and asked whether she had made such a statement, Miss BJorklund said: "I have no comment." When told of. the reported state- ment, Miss BJorklund said: "Where did you get that? It was a union meeting and only union business was The election was postponed in- definitely, subject to the call of Ralph Williams, the "union presi- dent. Employes of several hospitals and hotels working closely with the Mayo clinic are members of the union. Miss BJorklund helped or- ganize the union and has been its business agent since 1944. She WIIK active in a recent strike at Hovorul hotels, following which the Colonial hotel and several allied institutions. Aiding in. the fight to oust Miss BJorklund is a group of members of the local American Legion post. They obtained from Representative August Andrcsen a memorandum from the flics of a congressional committee which In- vestigated un-American activities. The memorandum mentioned ar- ticles in the Young Communist Review carried tinder the name of Gunhild BJorklund, She has described the accusa- tion as a "smoke screen under which they are trying to break up our union." She declined Wednesday to say whether she Is a member of the Communist party. "I don't think that Js an issue In this fight." she said. Dying Man Refuses to Name Murderer Jasper, Ga. A 70-year-old farmer, found with his throat cut, told attaches at Roper hospital here, I know who did it, but I will die before I Shortly after midnight Tuesday the farmer, E. L. Patterson, died. Those were his last words. Air Record Set on Minneapolis to Chicago Run Minneapolis Today's powerful winds were good for Nomclhlng, at lewit. A North- west Airlines Martin 2-0-2 pln.no flow Its piussrngcrs from Min- neapolis to Chicago In a. record hour and 12 minutes. The speedy twin engine took off from the Minneapolis airport at a. m. and landed In Chicago at Strong tall winds aided the plane. Average speed on the 350 mllo trip was 292 miles per hour, Captain Bob Brcnnan, of St. Loots Park, pilot, reported. Top speed wius KO miles. an hour, Brcnnan said. The previous Northwest record was one hour and 18 minutes. Scientists Seek Photos of Effects Of Cosmic Rays Minneapolis A first attempt to photograph, effects of cosmic rays from feet will begin this weekend. Physicists from the University of Minnesota and research men from General Mills, Inc., will work to- gether in the project, financed by navy funds. It will be the first of a scries of such flights. A plastic balloon, 70 by -100 feet, carrying a. light weight "cloud will be launched either Saturday or Sunday from Camp Riplcy, near Little Falls. The "cloud chamber" will be equipped with a camera to photograph cosmic rays atoms of thin metal plates. If the first flight cannot be mode this weekend, It will be postponed until next week. Professor Frank Oppenheimcr of the University of Minnesota said there would be no immediate scientific results avail- able. "Gathering of data is a slow, uncertain he said. "If any Some K Rent Hikes Permitted In La Crosse Washington An Increase of eight per cent in certain rents in the La Crosse, Wis., defense rental area was ordered today by Housing Expediter TJghe Woods. The order approved In part a rec- ommendation by the local rent ud- visory board. Woods found that increases In tax rates in the area between 1042 anc! 1947 justified the eight per cent boost. It will apply to all rents originally frozen in La Crosse coun- ty and to thoso rents subsequently adjusted. The local board recommended an Increase of 15 per cent for dwell- ing units In which heat Js furnish- ed by the landlords and of ten per cent where no heat is furnished. The part of the recommendation based upon higher costs of opera- tion and fuel had to be denied in accordance with the terms of the Housing and- Rent -.act ot 1947 Woods explained, because it was not substantiated. He added that his denial docs not bar reconsideration of the matter by tho board and the submission of a new recommendation, backed up by additional evidence. Winona County Not Affected Although Winona county rent aren Is administered out of the La Crosse rent office this order has no effect on rent regulations in Winona coun- ty. Several months ago the Winona county rent advisory board agreed to recommend no changes In the county rent regulations. Visibility Zero in North Sector Mercury Drops Sharply in Winona Area By AnaoclaUxl Prom. Powerful winds ranging up to SI miles an. hour pounded Minnesota unrt the today, bringing novcro temperature drops and llko condillonii In parts ot northwestern Minnesota. Tile winds churned a fresh snow- fall of a lioir inch to two In northwestern Minnesota, reduclnt visibility to tho T.CTO level. Winona mercury sklddrd 17 dnrrern from Wodnwwlay'ii 4T high to ten .above at noon today. Entire Minnesota, felt the winds which plummeted tempera, turos 30 degrees or more In a lev hours. It was 34 above in the Twin Cities nt a, m. By ra. it was two above, with 40-mllc- au-hour wind. Fergus Falls reported its storm as "very with the temperature eight below. Winds approached 50 miles an hour. Alexandria reported a 55-mllo-an- hour wind with gusts over 60. It wna with visibility rcro due to blowing snow. The Minneapolis Airport Weather bureau reported the disturbance one of the fastest moving ever recorded in this section. center of the storm was over Dick- inson, N. D., at p. m. Wednes- day. By midnight It had traveled about 450 miles eastward to Duluth, Wlllmar had a SO-mJlc-an-hour wind, five below, and zero visibility. Fargo three-sixteenths of Soviet Papers Play Up Election of A.L.P. Choice Moscow Pravda and other Soviet newspapers prominently pub- lished a Toss dispatch today report- Jug the victory of an American Labor party candidate In a. New York congressional election. The Soviet news agency's dispatch _..uu. j Allli w. Interesting effects ore noted, it ,.The of the election tnke many experiments to confirm considcrcci a victory for prog- ressivc forces and a demonstration them." Cosmic rays are little-understood, high-energy particles thnt emit radiation in outer space. From their study of cosmic rays scientists hope to obtain knowledge of unknown forces that hold the atom's central nucleus together, Man Plunges From Manhattan Bridge New York Elmer Locb, 36, Brooklyn, plunged 135 feet from tho Manhattan bridge into the East river Wednesday and escaped with only a slight case of shock. Loeb was fished out of the water by a passing tugboat. He told police he suffered a dizzy spell while crossing the bridge, leaned against iv guard rail, then toppled Over. of 6tl.cngth Of the movement for a third party." U. of W. Political Clubs Approved Madison, campus political clubs were approved by the University of Wisconsin Student Life and Interests committee to- day. The Henry Wallacc-for-President club elected offlccrs Wednesday night; and enrolled a membership of 80 students. Tho Wisconsin Studcnts-for-Har- old Stassen-for-President group also named officers and planned affilia- tion with the national office of Stu- dcnts-for-Stasscn. The Driver Of This Cur, Cab Combs, 33, got only a few cuts and bruises and a ticket for driving when tho auto shown above was totally wrecked between two Pennsylvania railroad trains at Rain-. mazoo. Mich., Wednesday night. (A.P. Wirepholo to The Republican-Herald.) mile visibility at a, m. and 42-mile wind. Detroit Lakes had a wind. and Crookston 50. The U. S. Woather bureau at Chicago today Issued the following cold wave warning: A cold wave overspreading North Central rtatos will at- tended by snow squalls In ths Great Lalcea regions and strong over a wide area tonight. Tempera- tures are expectecTtct JiCI to following by tomccrow Dooming: Minnesota 20 below north to ten below south. Wisconsin 20 below northwest to zero southeast. Nazi Marshal Convicted of War Crimes Nuernberr. Germany Marshal Wllhelm List, a grim-lipped Prussian of the old German officer school, was convicted of war crimes and crimes against humanity today by an American tribunal and sen- tenced to life Imprisonment, He was convicted for his conduct as commandcr-ln-chicf during Nazi occupation of the Balkani. General Walter Kuntzc, one of List's army group chiefs, also found guilty by the tribunal, which ruled these men should have known better than to carry out orders to slaughter hostages beyond the lim- its allowed by military law. was also sentenced to life. In the trial, the records showed that List's armies killed a hundred Serbs or Greeks for each German soldier killed by partisans, and at least 50 for each Nazi wounded. The tribunal acquitted General Hermann Foertsch. chief of the 12th army staff, and Major General Kurt von Geltner, chief of stall in Serbia. Soviet Insulted American Army, Hodge Protests Seoul Lieutenant General John R. Hodge today told Russia the manhandling of two American officers In Soviet-Occupied north Korea was "on insult to the States Army." Hodge is.commander of the U. 8. occupation zone In south Korea, He wrote Lieutenant General O. P. Korotkov, the Russian command- er, that ho held Korotokov respon- sible for the Incident at Pyongyang February 8. The Americans were on duty la Pyongyang nn liaison officers. Perkins to Speak in Madison Madlnnn. Per- kins, secretary of labor in President Roosevelt's administration, will keynote speaker at the 50th anni- versary of the University of Wis- consin Women's Sclf-Governmcnt association next Tuesday. Tho association's 35th conference, an annual Job guidance and evaluation session, will be held in conjunction with the anniversary observance. Rent Control Bill Nearer Passage A bill to con- tinue rent controls for one month through March 31 moved step today toward passage by the House. The House rules cleared It to the House. That the House members will bo allowed to vote on it next week. Present rent control laws will ex- pire Sunday after next unless Con- reuowK thorn.   

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