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Winona Republican Herald: Wednesday, February 18, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 18, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER FM IS COMING Be nuns yonr MW cut it. Full Leased Wire New. Report of The Anociated Preii Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 48. NO. I MATTER OF FACT Michigan Senator Praised Ky Jwwph urn! AUop Wiwhlnirion The Somite op position to tho European recovery proernro. always confunt'd but once rxtrcmely formidable, Is formldab o no longer. Tho Juntiv or 20 Republi- can senators who joined together to force compromise confronted wltii bin pre- serving nvcry os- riitlal principle K.n.T'. with tho urmnlmous ap- proval of the The gana to foreign committee. Division nnd drmornllwitlon have already over- taken the Junta of twenty, which In expected to cllwolvo lit ltd nuxt The bout tost of tho opposition's low estate In the fact thnt thono now thought likely to lend tho native riKht wcnliwi E.rt.P. In tho Senate Senators C. Wiiyluncl urookK of Illinois and William K. Jenner of Indlnnn. Brooks niict Jennor will of courM bo able to nilly fair number of more moderate and ron- Konftble men for their votn- cutchlntc amendment, which will probably reduce the 12-month ail- thorlmtlon for E.U.P. from 000000 to somewhere In the neigh- borhood of Although the vote miiy bo close, Senator Arthur It, VandonberK of MlchlKftn Is now believed nblo to defeat tho enemy even on this difficult point, WHAT HAH I1KKN accomplished, It must bo Hinted at once, lit pri- marily due tn the patience, wisdom lonu-heiidodiHWW of Senator VnndrnberK, with an nwlst crndltoel to Ambnswvdor Lewis W. Douglas, Douglas, himself, Is tho first to say, both In private nnd In public, that Senator VandenborK deserves thn principal credit. It In not much to that tho blK Michigan snnator JUMI dono whnt npponrcvl to bo 1m- powible. Initially. he was confronted with situation to order for the opposition, in which Tru- Mid Secretary of State Mnr- hud wholly fulled to rouse country or the Congress to tho urgency of the European problem. The H.R.P. bill. originally pro- Minted to the Senate and Houso, wim idK> full of ncoros of minor to the Congress. Those could be played upon by Iho op- position until tho little Irritants bfeume patches of (jenoriU Inflam- mation. Vnndenberc had extricated hlmnelf nnd IJt.P. from this grim poKltion by n simple method. Jto removed all the irritants, ono by one. meanwhile ho gave thu opposition plenty of ropo to hang with, W1NONA, MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 16. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN. PAGES IX THIM KKFOKT, he, wns 1m- nlded by Senators Henry Cfcbot Lodge, Jr.. of Massachusetts, an a member of tho foreign reln- tlonn committee, and William K. Xnowlnnrt of OMIfornla, ns a mod- rmte member of tho opposition of 30. The major Irritants in the E.R.P. bill were obvious from the start, VandenberK did not luive to mafce any Inquiries, for ex- umple, before he to mako the bill's ddmlnlstrnllvo provisions more palnuble to tho ConKress, But the minor Irrttants can bo very diincerous; and Knowland and JxXtKe rrported those back dally to VnndrnlxTK, so that they could be remedied by simple committee nmendments. It may soem foolish. Yet a certain sort of lawmaker can actually be conciliated by such i> sop UK the statement now In- ivrted In the K.H.I', bill, that K.n.P. Is not Intended to Impair UIP eco- nomic stability of the United Wtates, On major problems VatulonborK worked closely with DtniKlas, as representing tiwroury Marshall. A precedent was set when OouKlas attended all tho Senate committee's flraftlnK sessions. On Marshall's bo- half. Douglas approved both Iho really blc chatiKes In the bill, to the mrthwl of administration. and the shortonlnK of Iho first 3CJI.P. spenrtlntt period to 12 months, while objections were thus being removed and the groundwork for unwnlmlty was thus being laid, Van- denberit also killed tho opposition with kindness. AS KOH THK JUNTA of 20, Van drtiberg made Jokes about thp "rump riiUfus." arid he urged them to bo specific about their substitute for K.R.P. Kvrryone wanted "to do but no cue could agreo on what. TTin.i the 'JO began to appear to be disunited. It swms probable that their final meeting will clow with several of these sen- ators ready to support VatxienborR's bill. for some purposes, good sense In the contribution of other members of CongrrM was Iho es- wntlal, For example, the bill prrately needed an effective churn, In the HrillAO. Uppresrtitiitlvn Christian Herler lU'cttv likely tci br that rhampkin. imw that srynral of his committee's ore11 UiruriKiruted Vnnileiibel'K lifts III till! wlwly put Jlerter forward to head the. con- KreviloMul llnw it i committee with the 1C HP. administration. At other times. H little political horse trad' Inc WHS required. .Senator Alexander Wiley, most doubtful member of thn (triitt'te forrlitti relations committee, Is deeply Interested In the 8t. Law- rence seaway. Vnndi'nbcrg helped Knmtor Wiley over the HI. Lawrence project. nrousliiK ft human denim to reciprocate. of these methods aro big, some trifling In character. Yet thoy the stuff of American political The effect of Van- _...... effort lias been to show vii> (lie utul bankrupt state. Thnt Is now tho mrenicth of K.UJ'. Million Aid for China Asked 500 Cars to Be Built at North Western Shops Here in 1948, Cost is 125 Workers Will Be Recalled When Material Arrives Provision for tho rebuilding dur- ing 1048 of SOO steel hopper cam nt tho Wlnona of tho Chicago fa North Western railroad at a coat of Is included In Iho now maintenance and Improvement budget announced by thn llno'n official todny In Chi- cago. Thin mcanB, imld Charles P. Bnu- munn, general foreman of tho car department hero, that about 12B men will bo called back to work BH itoon an material Tor tho project arrlvo. Tho Job will koup the de- partment working nt capacity for tho remainder of the year and la nlmllnr to n car rebuilding program conducted at tho Winona whops In 1047. Stool and other materials arc expected nhortly. U. L. Wllllamc, prcslclnnt of tho railway nyttloin. annotmcod that au- thorization bcun glvon for tho purchase of 30 diesol locomotive unlw of various types nnd freight cars, supplementing freight and paMongor equipment now on Ho nald tho ny.itom budget for capital ImprovnmcntJi and acquisi- tion of new ucilllpmont IN of which represents ad- ditions and betterments to roadway nnd fixed property, for to oxlutlng rolling stock und us tho coat of now equipment now on order or nuthorlTcd to bo placed on order. Already under way In tho motive powor department of tho Winona In an Improvement program which Includes rebuilding of tho roundhouse. When completed tho Wlnonn roundhouse will bo equipped to service larger steam locomotives as well as tho now die- sols and It is expected thKt a fuel- Ing station will be installed hero in tho not too distant future. Employment In the motive power department In up to normal, said Ooorgo Bloesor, general foreman, but there niui is tlonal nnd sheet metal workers. To Order Now LooomntlTM The Chicago announcement In- cluded tho following statement from president Williams: "Authorization has been obtained for tho purchase of 18 dlcscl switch- Ing locomotives. 1ft dlcsol frolght locomotive units, six dlCHol passenger locomotlvos nnd freight cars. In addition, wo havo on order 10 dlosel switching locomotlvos, ono dlosel passenger locomotive, 1.400 frolght cars and 82 streamlined passenger train cars of various typos. Provision also Is Included In tho budget for rebuild- ing stool hopper cars at tho railway's Winona shops nt n of Somo of tho now diesol switch en- gines will be assigned to tho Winona yards. Among major budgeted Items Is ttio construction of a dlosol loco- mollvii sorvlou nnd repair shop at Proviso. III., nt cost of tho completion of construction of n modorn dlcscl locomotive service and repair shop In Chicago, and tho completion of a traffic control project between Chicago and Nolson, III. Construction on the latter two projects was started In 1047. To limtnll llrnvlnr Among other major projects In- cluded In thu budget are the Instal- lation of more than 130 miles of 115-pound rail and 222 miles of out- of-facu bnlliiHtlriK In high npcod territory, as well as a variety of Improvements to roadway, structures and equipment to provide Improved unrvlco, promote safety und increase efficiency. Thoso Include the purchase of ndclltlorml modern shop machinery, truck drainage, additional nnd Im- proved Ktntlon facilities, signal HVH- tcin improvements and other safety and protective devices and addi- tional yard and other tracks. The use of oscillating safety lights, the development of which was pioneered on tho North Western, will nlso be extended with their Installation on additional trains, including those In suburban service. Leo election blnod. (A.P. Wlrcphoto to The Republican-Herald.) Wallace-Backed Bronx Candidate Wins Election New York The smashing, Unexpected1' triumph of a Henry A Wallace-backed American Labor party candidate in a special Bronx congressional election handed Democratic party Chile, Britain Dispute Over Antarctic Area Chile Chile's president moved to establish a mili- tary bftso In disputed antarctic ter- ritory today after Invoking the Western hemisphere defense pact to bolster his nation's claims. While Britain hinted an appeal to the United Nations and Australia weighed sending a worship to the Fnlkland.s, Chilean President Gab- riel aonxalos Vldola pushed farther south on his spectacular expedition to set up tho base on what Chile calls Bernardo O'HIggln Island, Tho site Is on pnrt or tho territory known as Orahamland, which Is claimed by Britain. It lies astride tho Antartlc Circle. Dispatches to the Santiago news- paper Morcurlo from the president's ship, tho Transport Prcsldonte Pin- to, quoted General Ramon Canas Montalvn, Chilean army chief of staff, as saying the president's ac- tion is a step toward "building up Chile as a South Pacific power." Tho Drlllsh have protested both Chilean und Argentine activities In tho Antarctic and have announced they will support British Governor Miles Clifford of the Falklands In thcflo Issues. The .British Insist the Falkland administration covers Grahamland, Greenwich and other Islands, The British have sent the cruised Nigeria into the Antarctic Lo "show the flag." The Chilean president landed at Greenwich Island Tuesday. Address- ing Chilean troops there, ho de- clared that any attempt by a for eign power to territory claim- ed by Chllo In the Antarctic will bo considered an "aggression afinlnst all the nations of the Americas." Britain claims territory both cast and west of the 70th parallel, which Argentina nnd Chile consider their boundary below tho South Ameri- can continent. leaders a severe jolt today. kUVld Third party strategists, on the other elated, i lac'e himself, In Tampa, Fla., on a speaking tour, declared This proves that the so-called third party can become the first party In 1048." Leo laacson, the A.L.P. nominee, captured Tuesday's 24th district contest easily by rolling up more votes than his three opponents com- bined. Observers Amazed The victory, nnd especially its size, was amazing to political ob- servers who had eyed thu election closely for a hint as to Presidential Candidate Wallace's power to win votes In this national campaign year The Democratic candidate was expected to win handily, since the 24th district has sent members of that party to Congress for years. New York state Democratic lead- ers were sharply Interested, not only In Wallace's effectiveness but In the strength of the A.L.P., an Impor- tant factor in politics In the state for several years. Several large labor unions drop- ped out of the A.L.P. last month after It endorsed Wallace's presi- dential candidacy. In 10'14, the party provided more votes for Pres- ident Roosevelt than his state-wide margin over Governor Thomas E, Dcwey In the buttle for Now York's 47 electoral votes. Isacson, a 30-year-old attorney who will become the second A.L.P. member of Congress, won votes. Karl Proppcr, Democrat, not Dean Alfance, Liberal par- ty, and Joseph De Nlgrls, Re- publican, Four Men Killed When Roof Falls Klnnsport, Tcnn, The con- crete and steel roof of a building under construction here collapsed late Tuesday, killing four men and Injuring ten others. Scientists Fail to Find Key Answers About Mars MolXiiinld OliNnrvntory, Fort Dii- vlB, Tlio green HpoU on Murn may bo nomo lower form of litanl, lire, Hut uro nut plunU-i like the earth's trowi and grass, Antroitnnu'rH at McDonald obser- vatory Tuomlay night failed to Klvo a lint annwer to thu Intriguing ques- tion of whether there Is life on Mars but Dr. Gerard P, Kulper, director nf the ob.wrvatory. 1 luted several known factors for and agaln.it tho For: I, Thorn Is nomo water. Tho temperatures are not too cold. Agnlnitt: Hun Rnyi Deadly So far, It appears tho deadly Lravlnlot of tho nun would kill my form nf plant growth. Mo tuild ho hoped by March 1 ho could bo morn ol the definite on Immediate nomo which ntartod In October and which In now one-half complete. Tho obnorvatlonii have been aided by UHO of n now Infrared Hpoclro- motcr which was not, available until tho end of the war. Tho conclunlon that the green spots are neither seed plants nor two highest forms o! plant reached by compar- ing Infrared photographs of such onrlh plants with those of tho verd- ant areas of Mars. Dr, Kulper ex- plained. Tho dlncovory made this week at McDonald that there Is practically no sulphur dioxide In the atmos- phere of Mars was listed as a factor against the possibility of plant life. Dr. Kulper explained that the deadly ultraviolet of thn nun nro filtered out on tho onrlh by Ullt Mars ha.s no Sul- phur dioxide could act a similar llltcr but Mars has none. In New York city they've Just completed what In probably tho largent apartment In the world. It's made up of 53 rooms and 14 baths. TJh-uh, I beg your pardon 51 rooms They did tlieir uprlnic denning yesterday and found another room. UK; first apartment I ever saw where, Instead of tho towels, the bathrooms arc marked "his" nnd I went through the apart- ment when I wiui In New York, and I took n shave In tho bathroom, but it wasn't very (rood. By the time I not to tho jiiirlor, 1 Imd B o'clock shadow. Tim pollmi ilflpnrtincnt iniidn the OWIKTH tllltn Homi: unilNiml Jl'H probably tho only avmrlmunt that hail a St. Uernurd wandering up and ilown thu hall. In fact, the hallways aro HO long they have billboard ads. When you ring for tho liullcr, lie comes In his hot rod And It still takes him three hours to get to the bedroom. They've got n sign up out- thn apartment: "Not rc- npon.lllile for people left over 30 days." I won't say the rent is very high for the apartment, but If Crosby doesn't take It, It's gonna st.iy empty. In fact, tho apiirtmnnt IK HO tremendous rnriunoiint Is think- of unlnir H In our next picture They're gonna, call It "roud. to tho living room." Auto Plunges Into Ohio Creek, Seven Drowned Pomcroy. Ohio Seven per- sons drowned Tuesday night when their automobile plunged into a flooded creek at Bradbury, three miles southwest of here. The submerged automobile was found early today by Mrs, Emmctt Llg'htfoot. who lived nearby. She had heard a crash about p. in The automobile had missed n bridge over the creek. The victims, all residents of Jack- son, Ohio, were: Wilbur Keller, 27; Mrs. Roy Kel- ler, 52, his mother; Mrs. Clara Dllcs 54; Mrs. Gokllc Lambert, 33; Henry Lambert, seven, her son: Mrs George Sturglll, 10. and Richard TrcRO, eight. Rochester Labor Strife Gets Airing Andresen Union President Is Communist Rochester, Factional strife In local 515 of Public Workers Jnlon, C.I.O., which has organized workers in several Rochester hos- pitals and hotels, broke into the open todny amid cries of "commu- nist." The dispute centers around nt- to remove 28-year-old Oun- blld Bjorklund as union business igent. The election is scheduled for to- night. Nominations were made at the ant monthly union meeting. Vlce- Presldcnt Adolph Tuny, a leader In the fight against Miss Bjorklund, was nominated for president against Ralph Williams, who asks re- election. Miss Bjorklund, in office since 1944, was nominated without opposition. So also were Edna, Han- ralmn, recording secretary, and Evelyn Moellcrs, financial secretary. Seek Postponement A spokesman said the opposition would attempt to postpone the elec- tion In order to gain time In which l.o put up a candidate against Miss Bjorklund, around whom the chief I'ight revolves. He conceded this might take a bit of doing inasmuch as the membership, at Its last meet- ing, voted to close nominations. To effect the opposition's alms, he added, the membership would have to rescind its previous action. Certain members of the local Am- erican Legion post have entered the fight on Miss Bjorklund. They asked Representative August H. Andresen, Republican, of Bed Wing to investi- gate a report she was a member of the Communist party. Andresen wrote William L. Laabs, post adjutant, that "I wish to ad- vise that it has always been my opinion that this woman has been nnd Is a. member of the Communist party." Andresen presented a memo- randum Ivom a congressional com- mittee which investigated un-Amer- ican activities. It mentioned news stories which appeared in the Young Communist Review under the Search for Missing Men Abandoned Aboard the U. S. Aircraft Currier Midway O1T HycrcK llo.ids, France for eight men miss- ing from the U. S. Aircraft Carrier Midway was abandoned today be- cause of snow, rain and rough sens The men are believed to have lost their lives when their shorc-to- shlp launch was swamped yards off shore Monday night. name, Qunhild Bjorklund. Miss Bjorklund described the fight on her retention of office ar attempt to destroy the union. Of the communist accusation, she said: Called Smoke Screen "It's a smoke screen under which they are trying to break up our union. "We recently won the highest wages, for our members working in hotels, hospitals and the laundry here, of any place In the state in private industry. It is natural cer- tain people here don't want to sec them go any higher. The only way they can see to accomplish thnt (Continued on Pajre 14, Column 6) LABOR STRIFE Costello Elected Eire Premier Over De Valera Dublin. Eire John A. Cos- Lcllo was elected prime minister of a few minutes after De Minnesotan Dies in Auto Plunge Through Ice Minneapolis Walter Per- sian, 50, Crystal Bay, drowned Tues- day night when his auto plunged through the Ice on Lake Mlnne- tonka as he sought to tow his fish house to shore. Wayzata supported by five opposition ripped the top from the submerged parties. Eire today Parliament defeated Eamon Valera's bid for re-election. The 05-year-old De Valera, who was born in New York, had headed Eire's government since 1332. He mustered only four Votes out- side his own party, the Flanna Fail (Soldiers of in his bid for return to power. He lost 70 to 75. Costello, 56, a Dublin lawyer, was nominated for prime minister and to recover Persian's body. The vote for Costello was 75 to 68. Avignon Arrow Points to place Where eight American servicemen arc believed to havo lost their lives when a launch was Monday. (A.P WlrcphotO to The Republican-Herald.) 60 Million Repair Aid Also Sought President Points to Chinese Economic Crisis man asked Congress for today for aid to China, In a special message to the lators, Mr. Truman sold the aid would bo conditioned on taking adequate measures to "economic stability and recovery." The help would begin when Con- gress voted it and would continue until June 30, a one- year program. Mr. Truman said the economla situation In China now wor.se In spite of the aid the United States has given tho Chinese In past. War Burden The Chinese government and people, ho said, "oro titll! laboring under the double and Inter-reUited burden of civil war and a rapidly deteriorating economy." The war in China is between, Generalissimo Chiang nationalist government and com- munists. So aid to Chiang would In effect bo another American move to cbecJc Hutband of Mill City Woman Among Miffing Washington Maehln- Ist's Mate Raymond J. Fonccl. whose wife lives at Minneapolis, was one of eight men missing after a motor launch return- ing to the Midway was swamped oft Hycres. France, Mrs. Ponoel's parents said she WM In Flprida, her return, with child born ilnce Its sallor-father'n de- parture from the C. S. have been recovered. In- structions were given to the French admiralty ns to disposition of any found. Prayers for the officer six seamen and one said over the ship's loudspeaker. A duty guard rendered honors. The men were part of tho big carrier's 3.500-mnn complement They were returning from a fare- well party given at the small islanc of Hycres when the accident oc- curred. Fifty-three other men of Midway were rescued from ttie wa- ter oft" the French Riviera. The carrier was scheduled to weigh anchor for Naples at mid- night Monday, an hour after the accident occurred. Investigators aboard ship trying to learn from survivors what caused the accident. Initial reports indicated a freak sea had quickly fllled the 50-foot open motor launch "Mid-Three" while it upright and Intact. A rescue boat was.damaged when It rammed the launch later. "Mid-Three" left the French naval station of Port Pnthau short- ly after 11 p. in. Monday. Because o'f rough seas launches returning shore parties reduced their londs from, the customary 135 to about CO men. About 15 minutes after "Mid- Three" shoved off. Ensign J. Murdock, deck officer on the de- stroyer Gearing, anchored 3.00C yards offshore, thought he heard shouts. He directed the ship's searchlights toward tlic noise and saw the "Mid-Three" In the water to her gun-whales with. men. hang- Ing from her sides. Northwestern freight train of a double-cnglncd Carolina Injured publican-Herald.) communism's spread, communism Is one of Checking the argu- ments made for aid now going to Greece and Turkey and for proposed European recovery pro- gram. The program would provide: 1. An appropriation of that China could draw on (.as or gifts) and use to buy from other nations things badly needed. How much would be loans and how much gifts was not stated. Reconstruction Help 2. Another for "a few selected reconstruction to be initiated prior to June 30. 1B4D." The would be used to repair roads and railroads, fuel and power plants, and factories which, can make things the Chinese could sell to other nations. The United States has been help- ing China under general foreign relief programs. Mr. Truman noted In his message that the United States also supplied most of help that China got through United Nations Belief and Rehabili- tation administration. At Least 24 Dead in French Train Collision Lille, Master Albert Dufour of Thumcrtcs jailed today on charges of involun- tary manslaughter In connection with a train wreck Tuesday night which police sold cost at least 24 lives. The accident, caused when a pas- senger train collided with, a freight train, occurred near Thumerlcs, 15 miles from here. Just after the pas- senger train took aboard a number of factory workers there. It was en route to Doual, six miles away. Police said there may be more bodies In the wreckage. They said the number of wounded totaled about 40. Police said Dufour told them hod had an argument with an em- ploye and had become upset; thus he prematurely gave a signal for the passenger train to leave Thu- merlcs. Ordinarily, police said. passenger train was held in the sta- tion until the freight passed. Police said Dufour told them he realized his error and tried to stop the freight, taut was too late. Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Partly cloudy tonight, increasing cloudiness Thursday. Continued mild, except becoming colder Thursday night. Low tonight 30; high Thursday 48. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 52; minimum, 23; noon, 42; precipitation, none; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at Minnesota: Cloudy and warmer tonight with light suow north por- tion. Cold wave with snow flurries d strong northwest winds entering Red River valley late tonight and overspreading state Thursday and Thursday night with temperatures falling to 20 below north and around zero south Thursday night. Wisconsin: Cloudy tonight und Thursday with .snow flurries north- west and extreme north portions Thursday. Wnrjncr south and east and becoming much colder north- wost portion Thursday afternoon. TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Prec, Bemidji 33 3 Chicago ...........53 33 Denver ............56 37 DCS Molncs ........65 38 Duluth ............39 13 Trnc Int. Falls 13 2 Kansas City .......70 Los Angeles 82 51 Miami .............81 6S Mpls.-St. Paul .....48 28 New Orleans ......73 48 New York .........55 40 Seattle 50 40 PhoonlX ...........80 42 Washington .......05 34 Winnipeg   

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