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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: January 31, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 31, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER rllf rlnuitr wartncr loiililit unit itun IS COMING Bo rare your new radio can It. Full Leaied Wire Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 293 WINONA. MINNESOTA. SATURDAY EVENING. JANUARY 31. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES MATTER OF FACT 3 Defects Exposed InERP Hy Jwrph iinil Strwiirt Alsop A truKl-comlc row In In hnppy progress between Iho Ptntn depurtmpnt and tho Budget burenu. Thp burrnu. which Is ono of the most powerful nnd leudt publicized of thn federal Is now ruther often described ns "Thr I.lttln Kremlin" ut thr Stutfl dopnrt- nient, And thin In beeuu.v) the. bu- renu wn.i largely Instrumental In Inserting Into tho bill the fen- turps which Con- Thp Aliops Kress h u ,s most Perry Quits As Jackson Co. Judge In brief, the senutor.s nntl con pressmen studying the European recovery program huvp found threv main drfrets 111 the bill. 31r.it, thuy obJPi'ted to the Inclusion of un nil- thorlwillon to spend ft Klobnl Hum nf ovrr four yenrH wrorid. they objected to tho pro powrt system of ndinlnlitlrutlon whlfh would IIIIVP culled, In effect for the (Trillion of u new brand of thr Htntr depnrtniPitt, nncl third they arc now riled by whnt they rrirnrd u.i thp fnked computntlon of thn of for thr first 15-month period o All thrsr objpetlonublp fpu- turei hnvp been nnd urp blnmecl 01 the fltntr depurtnient. Objections one nncl two huvp now bppn flrnt, by slmpln rxcl.tlon of the totn by Arthur H. VundonborK and thr sppond, by replurnmeiit ol thr nrtmlnl.itrntlve system nulllnrt In thr bill by n system elewlKr fnr Senator Vandenberif by the Drooklngs Institution. it Ti Worth noting thnt the. tcitnl Wus In- rludPCl In thn bill by the UuclKel Hurrnu ovrr thr protest of Under Srcrrtnry of Stnto Robert- Lovctt nnd othpr mrrnbprs of tho dopnrt- mental stuff, The Budget bureui rtemnndPd nn over-nil total, Tho department opposed Including such ft on thn ground thut no nceurntc esllmutf of thp four-yeur rout of KHP could possibly bo of- frrpfl. burpnu thpn took the. mnttpr Into Its eiwn hnneln, nrrlv- init m. thn flgurn by utrixinfr K round nvnrnitti. And uftnr this, to thn (IrllKht of thn Slnto department, Senator VnndrnbnrK In turn took Ihn mutter Into hid hnnds nnd knocked the figure out of tho bill. As frW thr originally propated nys tern of administration, this too wns thn Jludicol burpuu's sornpwhul ex irprrif IntrrprPtntlon of Mrcrrliiry of Ntntr. Miirshnll's orlKlnnl speelflcu- lions. Whnt has now emerged from thp nrooklngs Institution Is not BO very fnr from whnt tho depurtmont .In the first instance. Finally, thrrn Is thn much mis- understood mutter the amount of appropriation for the first 16- month pprlod of Kill1, which hns rrcrntly been rulslng such n ruckus. Until Just prior to Ihn opening of thr roncrrssloiml session, the Slutc drpnrtment nnd llnrrlmnn rommlt- tre rxprrts expected thut Congress would be nsketl for This totnt comprised three, first, to meet obligations ulrruely rontrneteel by ICuropelin governments for Imports from tills rouritry, prior lo Initiation of srrorid. lo bn expended' AurliiK the first 15 months of KRI1; Ktid third. of forwnrd riivllU Wunclerlloh. Wlnonu snow queen, flanked by Don Johnson, left, and Roy Schllck of I Winter oiirnlvnl quemi committee fltund today beside the throne of the Ice palace where KlnR; Boreas witN crowned Friday nlghl In the opening curnlvnl ceremony. (A.P. Wlropholo to The Rcpubllcan- Paul xr Humid.) St. Paul. Boreas XI rclgnod toduy over St. Paul's cnrnlvnl kingdom, And the first order of the dny from his icy throne from which he will rule UurliiK tho nine-day fcstl- vnl of winter xporw. music and en- lertulnme.nt wu.s, "lot there be Thn king usconejocl to Iho thronn I'TUIny nlnht ninlcl KUUorliiK corn- nuiiilfis nobort Albruoht, King OorouM X. diirronclorod his scoptcr to Kdwnrd C. >Iumpc. Bornas XL Toduy wus n busy one murkod by natlonul speeding skating champion- ship, hockoy Rnmos, bowling, fig- ure nkntlng nnd cllmuxcd by it ipnrklinK purudo. Tlilrty-nlx snow qtinens from us nuny mltlwnstorn cltliis, plus 'u scorn of bunds, marching units, flouts, drum corp.s worn to compete 'or admiring glances from the throng of visitors. For thn finale, n grand cnrnlvnl bull Is scheduled tonight nt tho au- ditorium. Thn visiting snow queens Includ- ed charming Joyce Bannister from Scuttle, Wnsh., nnd nn Indian prin- cess, Durlene Dccory from Rnpid :lty, S, D. Thoro wcro other quocns from Wl- nonn, Wlllmnr, Duluth, Hlbblng, La Wl.s., Fargo, N. D., and Clruceful Shellu Smith, Canadian Igure skating champion, ropre.icnt- UK Winnipeg. Robberies Increase In Manila Area Mlilillu rontrnrts. fnr 1MO delivery lo bn i. llm" The U. S, army military luul civilian Orville Wrisht, Airplane Co-Inventor, Succumbs Dnylon. Ohio Doulh cumn l.o Orvllln Wrluht T'rlduy nlKht 44 years after lie put wlng.s on tno world with the flr.st flight In a hoftvler-than-atr machine. The 78-year-old co-Inventor of the airplane died In bis sleep under an oxygen tent at Miami Valley hospital at p. m. Dr A B. Browcr, his physician, said. Wright succumbed to a lung congestion and coronary ar- miirtr etiirliiB these first to trnvol In convoy.t of no The prr.wnl stnrlllriitlv tliffrrrnt "inn three riftor dark because) of tho lucrcusInK numbei of robberies. result emerged ufter Iludget burunu processing. flni, The Hureau knocked out the WOO.OOO.OOO for forplcn obllKn- tlons us not, nllowuble (thus Insuring thnt Eflfs eiistomprs would get off to n bud Marti, Krconrt, (he burpnu'd rxperti [xiintert out thut Kin U, S, trruxury Is distinctly slow pay. Out of every billion dollurn' worth of Enofls nnd services purctinsrd by the Kovprnmeiit In the next fiscal year, nbout worth will not be pnlrt for until months after thr yrtir hns ended, Therefore. they nriiUed, ERP mlitht rorisurne o goods nnd services In the 15-niontl I'rrlod from April I, ID-IB, throng) July 1. IJut the trensury woulf, only huvr for worth of these goods nnd services whrn thr next fiscal yeur elo.nnd Therefore, only this sum of wns Included In the IfMfl- IP49 biKlwet, eonvenlently brliiKlng the totiil V, H. burlKPt uneler thn clpnlrrcl by the rresl- drnl. TII lip Sure, All Iliesr fuels. In- f-ludliik' Hie need for nddltloniil Inter nn lo meet slow- Iiald Eltl' bills, urn nil elenrl.v noted In the tnidgi-l mi-.s.tnK'1. Styles ItrldKi-s must hnve n li-lfle less thnti frank, when he rhurfc-rd frntid nunliist the udmlnls- trutlon. Thr procedure adopted by thp liudpet burenu Is thn nt.anc.lnrd procedure of the Knvertimetit, us ulso In thr ruse of Including Iho Rlobcil total. And us chnlrmiin of the uppruprlutlons commit ten eif the Senntr, Hrrintor Jtrldi.-e.i iiliriiile! hnve liotli noticed tlir rxpliinnllon of this pru- eedlne In I he budKPt nnd hnvp known fedeml pi'uc'tlen well to reeoKnUe whnt WHS stnn- and fnmlllar. Neverthlpxji, the eontroversles over these trifling points hnvn syrloutily dnmiiKed KHfs chunces. Surely this mleht huvr been avoided by better e-oorrllnnilon. Hurely ulso, the, mere triviality und trchnlcnllty of these rr.ntrovrrMrN suKk'rsl the Utter ab- sence of imy ndefiuute sense of urgency In the Congress, Princcn Barbara Hutton Troubetzkoy Relapic Hum. Doctors reported thut Princess Trou- the former Barbara Hut- ton, suffered a rclapso Friday night They lidded thai, despite Home Im- provement this morning, her con- dition wim critical. Late Bulletin Speaker Martin nalil toduy Unit xiitmtriirN could "cx- prutn u Midilcn noup nnd ttikn uvrr HIP icovf-rniiiiint" If whui IIP ilrxprllipfl UK n powerful oum- imlfrn ivnurd to ilr.stroy fioiilldrncf) In ConjcrcNn In MIC- rrx.iful. Thn nprukrr Null! Amrrie.a fnr .YPtirx IIIIN luirliortill tlioli.sanilN of ppnplu whu would "riUboUiRG our American .system of free- dom urid our people and our Kovernmont umlvr the xway of nn nllcn Ideology nnd n for- cljcn clique rulers. Maltnnoy City. IV. A explosion In an anthracite rolllrry today klllDil two men Mini Injured live othorH. Thr hliint oeniirrril lit tlir IVIn- plp HIM mine of (hp. I'hllndnl- plilu inn) C'oul >V Iron ('nmpuny. Victims Muted it.s Adolph Netliiftky, JIB, and Taul I.Unix, 40, both of Slicnniidoah, I'll. Istrex, Six Bri- tNh military men wp.re killed ami five wounded when their LnnciiHtrr liombnr cruxh- ril Jn.it lifter taking off here for Hngluntl, the French pretuf agency xald today. Pierce County Sheriff Seeks Wounded Man ElUworth. Win. County Sheriff Victor Gllbertson watched hospitals and doctor's of- fices in the hope that medical Rid would be sought by tall, slender man who was shot In the born of Donald Rltzman, 35, about a mile and a half north of Exile early Thursday. reported to the sheriff that ho had shot the man in his barn, nnd fearful of prosecution, did not report the Incident imme- diately. The wounded man lay In the barn for about five hours, the sheriff said, before a companion rescued him. The sheriff said told him thut: Awakened by the barking of his dog, early Thursday, he went to the barn, found the stranger there with a companion. The two men hud a rope around the neck of one of RlUman's cows. Rl toman ordered them to stop but one ran out the door and fled in a truck parked alongside tho barn The other appeared to reach for lib pocket and Rltzman fired "two or three times." Tho man fell and Ritzman feared ho had killed him. The farmer re- turned to his house and pondered the situation. At day break, a man appeared, announced himself as the sheriff of nearby Dunn county and said he had come to get the cow Uilcf. Sheriff Gllbertson said the wound- ed man needed medical aid. RIU- mim reported he saw blood on a denim Jacket worn by the man and tv small pool of blood was found In the barn, Indicating the man was wounded In tho lower left side. 21 Persons Known Dead In Crashes Sparta Woman Notified of Daughter's Death By The Associated Prewi Discovery of 12 bodies In wreckage of an air force transpon nt Digne, France, today brought to 21 the total known dead in two United States airplane crashes in southern France. Reports reached here that search- ers had found the bodies of three American women, five children anc four crewmen where the first plane fell. Tin; crash occurred near a vIlliiKc In the French Alps. The urufl wu.4 u C-47. the In Spnrtu, Wl.s., Smith said today Mrs. Blanche shu hud been notified that her daughter and three grandchildren were killed in the crash of a DC-3 transport In Ku- rope. The daughter, Mrs. Gifford Monk and her three children were on their way to Join Warrant Officer Moak In Trieste when their plane crushed The children were Gifford, Jr., five; Mary, three, and Vcrim, 18 months Mrs. Smith said her daughter, a former Sparta girl who more recent- ly lived in Worcester, N. Y., and the children sailed from New York January 5. They were en route from France to Italy, along with the families of two other army men when the crash occurred. A second plane, a B-17 Flying Fortress, went down and exploded on a. search for the transport. Po- lice said one man In its crew of ten survived. Both planes struck within a 20- mile rndius of Dlgne, which is about 75 miles northeast of Marseille. Ground searchers reached the wreckage of both planes Friday They brought out only one sur- vivor. He is Sergeant Angela A. La Snllc (believed to be from DCS Molnes, lowa.l Snllc .suffered partly fimcn Ings, bruises and in- l.rmul Injuries, The U. S. air force listed the pilot of the C-47 transport as Lieutenant Earl E. Buskin of Florence, S. C. and Its co-pilot na Second .Lieuten- ant Tcrrvel H. Trexler of Dunn, N C The crew chief was listed as Staff Sergeant Donald L. Cllmmcr.s of Dumont, Iowa. The uir force .said the name of the fourth mem- ber of the crew would be announced Inter, terioscelcrosls, a heart disease. The world's pioneer aviator en- tered tho hospital last Tuesday after suffering his second heart, altuclc of recent months. He recovered rapidly from a first attack October 10, 1947. The aged scientist took a turn for the worse Wednesday night when a lung congested, held staunchly for a few hours early Friday and then sank slowly into a coma that pre- ceded death. Mr. and Mrs. Horace A. Wright! Representative and Mrs. H. S. Miller of Knutson (R.-Minn.) claim- Knutson Claims Votes to Pass Tax Cut 2 to 1 Minnesota State Hospital Program Will Be Expedited St. Paul Minnesota will lose no time In expediting Its proposed hospital construction plan, Dr. Viktor O. Wilson, chief of ;ho division of special services, Min- nesota department of health, said at a public hearing today. Applications for construction grunts from the first year's allot- iit of federal funtlii will bo ullticl boglnnlrix wciik from communities In which proJccUl are ilaiined. Dr. Wll.son explained. However, approval by the U. S, public hcullh service of the state's >lans Is required before tho appli- cations can be processed. The hearing was held at the state office building to acquaint the pub- ic with provisions of the plan which was outlined In detail today by Dr. Wilson. One third of the cost will bo paid by federal grants-ln-ald nnd .ho remainder by the owners of the lospltnJs. nieces and a nephew, were at his side at the end. -With them was Nurse Delyle Myers. First to send me.ssrigc.s of con- dolence were General Joseph T. McNarney, commanding general of the air materiel command at nenrby Wright field, and Colonel E, A. Deeds, chulrman of tho board ol National Cnsh Rofflster Company and the aviator's clo.se frlund. General McNarney sounded the note which most clearly showed the international character oC the slight little man whose dreams turned Into reality within his lifetime. "Our great said McNarney, "is thnt through the gift he gave the nation, America will be em- powered to maintain world peace." Without Orville Wright's cloth, glue and wood contraption nnd his 12-sccond flight over the sands of Kitty Hawk, N. C., in 1003, there would be no air force, but the Inventor himself readily admitted he never had envisioned his airplane us the world's big military weapon. "Quite he remarked led today enough Democrats will support his tax cut bill to pass it two to one. After two days of staling debate, the vote was set for Monday. The House did not meet today. Meanwhile, Democratic lenders polished up a substitute bill which would hold the income tax reduc- tion to about It, would tax corporiil.lon profits to make up most of the revenue loss. All the Democrats hope for Is a good showing. The substitute has no chance. In the Senate, though, even the Republicans admit the slash provided by the Knutson bill will be trimmed. This will be a bid for Democratic help to over- ride the expected presidential veto by the necessary two-thirds ma- jority. Representative Graham A. Bar- dcu (D.-N. C.l told the House Fri- day the G.O.P. cut is too deep. He he might vole for It, Just the .same, in the expectation that the Senate will tone it down. There were signs thnt quite a few other once, "Wilbur (his late brother feel the same way. co-Inventor) and I could not foresee whnt awful use could be made of the airplane. But it Is, and will be of tremendous Importance in peace." Simple funeral services will be conducted at p. m. CC.S.T.) Monday in the First Baptist church here, of which WrlRlit wns a mem- ber. Dr. Charles L. Scasholes, pastor, will conduct them. Burial will be In Woodland cemetery. Two Persons Die in Beloit Fire Bc-.loll, Two persons burned to clqath and two more wen; injured critically In a fire Friday night in n. two-story frame resi- dence. At least eight others escaped injury. The dead, both Negroes, were: Burden said the people arc ex- pecting "reasonable" tax relief. The Republican measure woulc raise individual exemptions from to S600, let married couples in all states split their income for tax reporting purposes, and cut taxes besides by percentages rang- ing from 30 per cent In the lowesl Income brackets to ten per cent in the highest. Face Charges for Gambling- Devices St. Tniil Two lowans- Claudc E. Van. 35. of Des Molnes and Lee Brings, 41, of Davenport, plcndud Innocent In municipal court Friday to charRCs of possessing gambling devices. Trial was set for February 10 and the two were released on bail each. Sobbing, Chanting Indians Witness Gandhi Funeral _ By G. Milton Kelly New Delhi, India Mohandas K. Gandhi's youngest son touched off the funeral pyre that consumed the wasted body of the martyred Mahatma today In the Hindu tradition. Tens or thousands of Indians, sobbing and shouting the Ma- hatma's name, surged forward as Devadas Gandhi, heavy with grief, placed live coals on the pyre just above his father's heart and set ablaze the lower portion of the pile of sandalwood logs. A tremendous sobbing chant surg- ed from the Hindu hymn for India's prophet, of peace, who wns .struck down Frldny p. in. n, m. C.S.T.l. by an bullet as he went to a prayer mooting. In n. mighty roaring unison, the crowd chanted the pray- ers of the last rites, as police strug- gled lo restrain the grieving peo- ple. Devadas Gandhi's face was taut with the strain as he applied the couls. The snndalwood crackled. Smoke .splralcd heavenward. The Muhiitmn's ashes nre to re- main at the pyre, on the bunks of the river Jumna, for n day and half. Then they are to be gath- ered and taken to the river Ganges to his Hindu thrown Into the waters In the man- ner traditional with Hindus. India Gripped With Fear India was gripped with fear of what may come in the wake of Gandhi's violent, death. Rioting In Bombay, which took 15 lives Friday, subsided somewhat, but In Poona, the office of an extremist Hindu newspaper 'was burned. Sullen Poona crowds attacked the property of persons known to have opposed Gandhi. Tiluk Memorial hall was set afire as crowds searched for anyone possibly connected with the assassin. Bombay police arrest- ed live persons suspected ot being Implicated. Now Dulhl police disclosed Unit. Gandhi's accused assasnln had been arraigned secretly and held without ball for investigation of murder. He was arraigned under tho name of Narayan Vinayak Gadse of Poona. The 25-year-old assassin had pump- ed bullets into Gandhi's chest and leg at close range. The procession tho Jumna rlv- was l.umull.ous all lilt way. At one point, Prime Minister Jnwa- harlal Nehru was reported to have rescued a woman endangered by the crush of people. Women fainted in. the tremend- ous crush. Children collapsed un- der Men bled from wounds in- flicted by the flailing sticks of those fighting for a view of the proces- sion. Crowd Hour by hour the crowd grew along the five-mile route from Birla house to the river, until tens of thousands of Indians milled about in turmoil, ccasely shouting the mime Of the Mahatma, The cry 'Victory Lo rnng out fre- quently above the clamor. Gandhi's body had been bathed during the night In accordance with Hindu tradition. At 4 a. m., a sim- ple prayer service wns conducted in the Dickering light of castor oil lamps, burning constantly to light the way of the Mahatma to heaven. The room was heavy with the scent of roses. Gandhi's relatives ind his close friends sat around the jler, chanting from the scriptures of the Hindu, Mohammedan and Christian religions the passages best ovcd by the departed saint of India. The women sung .simple hymns he Had loved. On the pallet on which he used to sleep lay the Mahatma's body, his 'ace austere in death, A white robe was drawn up to the throat. Red and rose petals were strewn over the robe. Devanilan Gandhi American First To Grab Hindu After Murder New Delhi, Amer- ican by-stander told today how he seized the assassin of Mohandas Gandhi before police took the man into cuntody. The American, who hud none to Gandhi's prayer meeting. Identified himself as Herbert Reiner. Spring- diUc. Conn. Ho gave thli "People were standing an-though paralyzed. I moved around them, grasped his (the slayer's) shoulder and spun him around, then took a firmer grip on his shoulders. "Royal Indian nlr force men dis- armed' him mid police took him into custody. I did not see him do any- thing to indicate he wanted to kill himself, and I don't believe reports he tried to kill himself at that time." Expreued Hope to See Gandhi Stamford, Conn. Herbert Reiner, Jr., the American who Bciz- cd the assassin of Mohandas Gand- hi, had recently expressed the hope in a letter that he might some day see the Indian leader and attend one of Ills prayer meetings. His mother. Mrs. Herbert Reiner said at her home here today that it was apparently to fulfill that hope that her son pres- ent when Gandhi was slain. Reiner, who is 32, went to India in 1047 as a disbursing and finan- cial officer for the American. State department. He served in the navy during tlic war and was discharged In 1940 as a lieutenant commander. 30 Search for Missing British Airliner Hamilton, Bermuda Some 30 planes combed the stormy At- lantic around Bermuda today in a widening search for a British air- liner missing with 29 persons aboard including a British World Wax- II leader. An airline official said the ship carried 23 passengers and six crew- men. One passenger was Sir Arthur The door of the room was thrown jConingham, retired British air Fannie May King, 34, and Perry i The two were arrested early Wed- Tolllver, 45, Injured were Henriettajnesday in a hotel here. Police said Scott, about 28, and Joble Rogcrs.ithcy found equipment for making 30. land loading dice and lists of Twin Fire Ch'.cf Elmer Falrbert said convention mid .stag party fire started in an overheated stove, u.stid for hciiUng part of thu liou.'ic, uid .ipriMid niplclly through first floor of the building, which Fulr- said wn.s condemned two years ago by the fire marshal. Firemen used ladders to rescue occupants of the .second floor when .hey weru cut off by the bliwtng stairway. Fairbert said two families lived in the building, but that there ulso were visitors from Chicago then; at ;hc time. He said 11, was Miss king's home, but he had not been able to ascertain which others lived ,hcre. dales In their possession. Chinese Cabaret Friends Wreck Building Shanghai Rioling Chlne.se cabaret (f'l'ls and their men friends tonight wrecked the Municipal So- cial Alfalr.s Bureau building and in- jured an estimated 20 Shanghai policemen. An estimated girls and an almost equal number of men com- panions rioted In protest against the city's closure of 14 cabarets in connection with. China's austerity program. open at 5 a, in. to admit the peo- }le in a long sincle file, in reward 'or their night of -vigil. Just before noon the frail body was placed on a flower-draped plat- form atop an automobile. Prime Minister Nehru and Deputy Prime Minister Sardar Vallabhal Pate! rode close behind as the guard of honor. Eight members of the governor general's body guard and armored lighting vehicles led the procession, clearing the wny for it. A moving line of husky noldlers, Lhclr hands locked l.o form a chain along each slfie of the road, edged along with the procession to prevent the peo- ple from passing through. The dense masses .showered flowers from the sidewalks, windows and house- tops as the funeral car passed by on the circuitous route to the river. Chinese Communist Threat Erased Government mili- tary dispatches reported today the Chinese communist threat to the Peiping-Jeho railway in north China had been rrnsed by forces sweeping through the: Kreut wall. Nationalist troops from Jchol province were described as hitting marshal and hero of the North African air war. Weather :.he reds' cnstcrn flnnks. particularly] Kansas' City n Ihc nren between Tunghslen. Angeles FEDERAL FOEECASTS Wjnona and vicinity: Partly cloudy tonight and Sunday. A lit- tle warmer. Low tonight ten in the city, five in the rural areas; high- est Sunday 24. Minnesota: Fair south mostly cloudy north tonight nnd Sunday. Warmer north tonight nnd entire stntn Sunday. Wisconsin: Fair tonight and Sun- day. A few snow flurries near Lake Michigan. No Important change in temperature. LOCAL WEATHER Officlnl observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 24; minimum, l: noon, 15; precipitation, none; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Prec. Bemldji 21 Chicago Denver Des Molnes Dululh International Fnlls milc.s oust of Pulping, and Mlyun, 35 miles to the northeast. Man Dies When He Hears News of Gandhi Calcutta, India An 80- vcnr-old man wns nt a radio when t announced the assassination of Mohandas K. Gandhi Friday night. He collapsed and died. 23 38 21 22 30 G4 77 23 New York Seattle 47 Phoenix 62 Washington 28 Miami Mpls.-St. Paul New Orleans 9 31 10 Truce 2 Trnce .01 .06 Edmonton 35 Regina 28 The Pas 24 Winnipeg 18 fl 23 72 4 31 2 28 36 (i Ifl 12 14 14 .08 .09 .04 .02 .03 Resignation Accepted by Rennebohm First on of Recall Petition Made BImck River F.Ug, citi- zen's movement to oust the Jackson county Judge, begun In the smaller communities or the county, won a. clean-cut victory today when Gov- cronr Oscar Rennebohm announc- ed he had accepted the resignation of Judge Harry M. Perry, 68. It was a victory for the Trempea- Icau Valley Association of Com- mercial Clubs, headed by Gconre Purnell, McrrlJlnn. which started circulation of n recall petition 30 days RRO. The association chwgrd that county's hospltallzatlon fund monry has been spent for hay. corn, chick- en feed, sport clothes and tajd service, and simultaneously charged that Jackson county is "practically bankrupt." Fimt Report on Petition Announcement thnt the Judee quittlnjt fills term doc-i not expire until IflSOl comes us Um 25-odd circulalora of tlic recall peti- tion were making their flrst reports to DC Vnn Staples, Merrtllan'i country board supervisor. President PurncJJ siUd that a pre- liminary chrck had shown that circulators had secured signatures far m excess" or the number re- quired, adding that an exact count would be made at a meeting in Mci-rlllan Sunday afternoon. Said Purnell, "This resignation satisfies us. Our interest in who is judge ends here, we're not run- ning any man. We were getting a man out. Of course, resignations can be withdrawn, so our Interest will continue to a, certain extent This recall drive has been won- derful. It has given people of Jackson county a chance to slsn a, legal document stating what they Wo found the peophs want- ed information. Wo licked wcrccy and ignorance with information. Flrhl Will Continue "We're happy about the turn of the events, but. our flglit will con- tinue. Investigation has shown that the flnnncin.1 condition of county is In far worse shape than we originally said. There should more resignations, but we'll get to that a little later." Although the recall sponsors adding figures, the governor's an- nouncement ended the recall drive. Rennebohm said that the Judge. whose resignation Is effective Im- mediately, gave no reason for action in stepping from an oBlce ho has held for 13 years. Since the of commercial clubs In Taylor. Alma Center. Mcrrlllan and started circulation of the petition, rumors that the Judge would resign have abounded. But as late as Tuesday of this week the rumors were scotched by a letter from governor to District Attorney Vic- tor Gilbcrtson, Black River Palls. In which the governor sold no resigna- tion had been filed. Rcidtnutlon Accepted Yesterday, however, Louis Drecfc- trohl. Perry Drccktrahl. went to Madison, and the governor's an- nouncement followed. Whether Judge Perry made the trip could not be ascertained immediately. In Jackson county speculation immediately began as to whom would be appointed to succeed Judge Perry until his successor can elected at the regular election in April, but the announcement from the governor's office Indicated would be made to fill the vacancy. An Associated Press dispatch, said. A successor will be chosen at the April election." It has been assumed that Hans Hanson, Black River Falls attorney, would oppose Judge Perry if tha drive for the recall resulted in a special Judgeship election. In 1943. after Judge Perry had received ona appointment and two elections as county Judge without opposition. Mr. Hanson, native of the com- munity, opposed the re-election and conducted a campaign In his own behalf. He lost. For several years there was no public opposition to the Judge. Then last fall the new Jackson county board of commissioners, after a heated session, relieved Judge Perry as welfare director, replacing: Urn with Kcrmlt Hanson. The new director also failed to re-hire Mrn. Perry who hnd been employed in the county welfare office. Launched January 12 It was at a meeting of the Trcm- x-aleau association at Merrlllan January 12. when the recall action was launched with Oscar Peterson, Merrlllan; Harold Bartholomew, Alma Center: Herman Molzau. Hixton, and William Helstad. Tay- or, at the helm. The association's action drew wide attention, since recall governing device provided for the rarely used. But the 31nck River Falls Banner Journal. weekly owned by Congressman Hull, "has refused to co- Purnell snld. When the Judge heard about j recall move he said it was the result of a political feud resulting from his victory over Mr. Hanson in the last election. But the resignation came yester- day, ending apparently a long period of public service by Judge Perry In Jack-son county. Born in 1879, lie was admitted to (Continued on Page 3, Column PERRY   

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