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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, January 17, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 17, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER lint litn JS COMING jonr new radio can 1C Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated' Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO. 281 V7INONA. MINNESOTA. SATURDAY EVENING. JANUARY 17. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES MATTER OF FACT Air Base At Tripoli Important Tlr Jnwijih ami Hlcwiirl AlMip Tho new American tninmxiti bnun nt Tripoli like nmitll purl of nn Iceberg thut ixbovn the nurfucii of tho In this ciw, what. In flon- o-ftlcrt Imppriiii to hf nf vital im- portance to tho United Slated, und to tho world, The base has been otTlcliilly do- xcrlbttd by Secre- tary of Defense lui n morn link "Iri tho trunl: Jinn Aluopn lo Athens." It hard to Imagine n morn extreme official understatement. In point of frirt, the purpose nf Iho base Is not prlmivrlly to strengthen tho line of communication.1) H> Oreeen, but to niri'tiKthi'M Anicrlctin power In tho Us rntitbllnti- mrnt In thp outcome of n long nncl hitter dispute, which has nKltfttod the wholn administration. over tho bent, to counter InenwiInK Novlrt pre.wuro Upon Ornrce, And thr Idnt of In Tripoli or Cyrrnnlciv was first proposed iwi nn ftltrrnnUvn to sending American troops to art-pep. OhTlfinnl.r, it lurifp mid fully nlr tfurwjHirl eun converted promptly null at will, fnr hy nvlntlim, Kiiimlly olivlnimly. it Tripoli Kir (mar will rommitml tlir wlinlo nuntrrn Mpclltrrrunpiin. Hut DIP nwnlJivlly intrritlnn of nrw American stnp Is fully provpn, not by mprp olreumstan- llnl pviilpnpp, hut hy Ihn olikr- of thp illxpntn rrrprrcd in This dispute In Wushlnmon was nf course M.itrtod by the all-out ef- fort of the Soviet-sponsored "Clrook republican government" to seUn n hrndciimrlcrs on Greek noil, nt Ko- nltsn. fliKnincniitly. no faction with- in thr iidmltil.Mnit.tcm advocated abandoning Greece to her fate, Tho iictiiitl sending of American troops to Greece wns Htrotiidy advocated by minority group, chlctly recruit- from trip iUntn department, whose motto was; "Kvoiituitlty; why not The majority, strong- mt In trio service dopnrtmentit, op- poKPd troop.t on two Thnt thn oommltmont would too dlrrct; und thut tho drtrrrrnt rffoct of nn Amnrtciin In thp Trlpoll-Cyi'pnulcu uron would bp rjultp n.i tfrpiit, u.i thn pfTrct of n xmivlt Amcrlciin forcn on Orcok -15 Second New Low in 2 Relief Promised -54 at Gordon, Wis., Ties State All-Time Low BULLETIN By The Auoelated FreM The coldeat upot today WM the vlllnirr of Gordon In Douiclaii county, Wlficonnln, where It Wai 51 below zero. Thn mailing; equalled the low- nit murk In the of weather recording iri the itatc. The came temperature, 54 be- low, reflrtered lit Dunbury in Burnett county January 21, 1022. Wallace Says He's in Race For Keeps Third Party Candidate Sets Chicago Speech Chicago Henry A. WiUJace said today lie is "In the rnce to stay" as a third party candidate for Pres- dent. In Chicago for a -major campaign ipccch on domestic Issues p. m. C.S.T.) at the convention of the Citizens ot America, he old newsmen: "I'm going right throuRh with this light. I'm In It to the end." The P.C.A, planned formal en- dorsement but no third party nom- ination of Wallace at Its two-day convention. Wallaco said nomination would come In April or Inter nt a con- vention of his third party, yet to be named. Wallace said his P.C.A. backln presidential nomination should Ret was only a fraction of his supper Into tho stftto primaries "so thatiHo said only one-tenth of one pc the people will have a chance to cent came from communists. say who they want for their noml- Askod how innny states lie expec to carry In November, he said was "too early to tell." He declined to name his cholc Republican Race For Nomination Begins to Shape By Jack Hell Washington Senator Ken- neth S. Wherry said to- day all candidates for the O.O.P. 3 Rail Unions Call Walkout for Feb. 1 Senator Owen Browster of Maine expressed similar- views, telling a reporter: for "A dlroct expression by tho voters mate. on their prcfcrcnco certainly would bo ft improvement over tho unofficial polls which have a vice-presidential nuuiln But in reply to a reporter he mild lie Uioiwhl; "vnr hlKhly" of O. John attorney general. forme He siil been taken and which may be used for propaganda purposes." gestions call 'f Peo A go-ahead signal from Governorlg uo s erc to cn ifte Thomas E. Dewey Friday to Oregon supporters who have entered his Other suggestions Wallace said, are "Tho People Democratic "The Dcmlcar name In that state's May 21 prl- or "The Liberal Party." Only till- future will which fiictUm WIIM oorrpot, Mimnwhllr, two further of ronnrctnt fnrUt, al.io not nffl- flullr dlidmrd, urr   ftrrvlnr of Somr of Itir Inn nnlKlcitllr mlnclril dhji-otrd, In tlm dUputo ovpr to llii" whdld (if nld." 'I'lvry nfKuril tlml thn HovlpU would not to rrln.T {irrMurn on or oihrrwlso to ohiuiKe their policy, rlthrr by or (muni which wcrp not lo IMI unoil, Tho rllnchrr of Ihono who hold the theory of rpntt" WHX thp rxprrlpnop lit.it Dpormbpr In itjtl.v, which In- volvcvl ntlll unothcr oDIolul un- Expert Suggests Middle-of-Road Tax Slash Bill Washington DouKhlon (D.-N, O.) predicted to- clny Congrcfld would siuitnln a veto of thn prcHont KnuLion bill to Mash tncomn taxes a year. Tho original wlthdruwnl clnto for the AmrrlfciN occupntkui force In Italy wn.i Drcrmbrr 3, IM7, At the last moment, thp withdrawal wit.il of two'cvliii] temporarily clrfnrrcel. for the ile- rlnrcf! rcitxoii thiit cerlnln tllffloul- tlr.i of tratisportiitlon untl itclmln- iKtratlfin hml encountered. The communist ollenc.lvo ugalnst thr Italian frovrrnmcnt hncl been timed to coincide with thr retire- ment of tho American Tho troopn Irfl brhtncl were hardly more than n umiill band of Mipply KntntK, Yet ttio whole tempo of the communist attack utrlkos, propaganda nnd faltered and WIIB thrown out of kilter. Simultaneously, thr Hovlrt union hastily and itrinxtX'ctrclly com- piled, fnr the record, with treaty to rvnrtmtc IHilgiirlu when nir itixl nrltlnli left Italy. AUnit KKi.nnn Uiifuiiitn tniop.i were htiHtlrd, huKner-iiuiKKi'i1, nernm tfie bcirtlrr Into Uotimnlu, mul the nev- rral of thoiiKiindfl left be- hind were put Into faiiey ilrniw un dlmpln rlvlllniiA. Procuring IhrNf rrf.iilu courne, thn real imr- [Kinr in the deluy of our evaciinllon of Italy. Indeed, the move hud been the nubXr of still unothcr ills. between the untl-polltlcnl jnrrribf-r.1 of the nervlceii who wl.ih- rd to stick to thr aliiidunced ule, and thr wl.ter men whti wtw whiit eoriHklerublii inlnht he Uitlurd hy n deluy. The men wiiti uriri I ho profit.1! were rpniietl. Nnp N ItiU nil. TliP rnlr nf Mriilpimtit (Irnrnil rilirtll K, I.rMuy In tirKiitlulliiK rNlnlc llihnifnl nt (hp 'IVIpnll bine rlrnrly provpH tvlmt Hus alrp.tdy lifrn prlnlnt In ItiU lui't not pvrn iinw lulinlllril cl.nr- (icnrriil l.p.Muy'w slon In Kuropp IN nut mrrrly to eiimmjinil UIP nmull American ulr In Orrtniiny. lie l-t Ihpfr lo rpvlptv HIP whnlo KII- roprun slritleKle -iltiiiitliiii wUh Ihr Opnrrul HUff urn) olliPrn, und In lulip lo Unit Thp Tripoli lump h only it llrsl trult of fill luhiir.i. Republican-Herald photo Cold Ilocopllon? This family of now Wlnona residents have found u cold reception since thoy moved here a week ago.. But It's duo to tho fuel oil tho cordiality of Winonans gen- erally, they admit. For three days their apartment house has been out of oil and this morning the temperature In their bedroom was 33. They are Mr, and Mrs. Joo Nogard and 14-month-old daughter Peggy. After breakfast in n downtown snack Hhop whuro got warmed up, Joo went to work and Mrs. Negard and Peggy spent the day with friends. The came hero from Slovens Point, Wis. Mr. Nogard la an insuranccman. Numbing cold continued to hold the Wlnona area In Its grip today. The mercury here last night drop- pod to a (tinging IS below and by noon today had risen 'to which also the high point for the last 34 Last night's reading net a now low the present winter season. An unofficial temperature of wan reported In QalcsvlIIc early today. Tho temperature In Mlndoro, Wis., dropped to Tho forecast for tho Wlnona area is Increasing cloudiness and not no cold lowe.il, In tho cli.y and in tho rural areas. Sunday will be mostly cloudy with rising temperature, tho highest 22. A light snow i.i indicated for Sunday night At Ettrick, power lines snapped duo to the cold, cutting off the community's electricity from to a, m. today, when they wore repaired. As several Ettrick oil fur- naces are electrically-operated, B real hardship was imposed. Busses in tho Winona urea were running on time, however, as were most trains, 42 Below at Grand Rapids A minimum of 42 below was rec- orded at Grand Rapld.s early today, lowest in Minnesota and lowest at Grand Rapids since February 23, 1030, when the mercury sank to Terrific cold was general through- out tho state today. The following minimum temperatures were re- ported from representative locali- ties: Park Rapids Broinord Bemlcljl Wadcna Fergus Falls International Falls -28 Alexandria Hlbblng Du- luth St. Cloud and 'Willmar Rochester Twin Cities -12. The wavo of wub-wro cold caused tho death of Mro. Arnold Lund.itcn, 23, Fort Rlploy, last night. Mrs. Lundsten's body was found along a highway between her homo and tho home of John Solarz, two mile away across tho Mississippi rive where she and her husband ha been guests at a wedding annlvcr wary party, 8ho had to deal! Out Wlthiiul Omit Coroner E. C. Ooblei'sch of Mor tho North Carolin- ian toUl it reporter, ho thinks Presi- dent Tr-immn Is wrong In hU stand that there should be no over-all reduction In federal revenues. And If tho Senate "moderates" ;ho CI.O.P. tax measure after It onvos Iho Houso it might muster tho necessary two-thirds majority to override a Presidential turndown, the veteran congressional tax ox- pert said, An matters now stand, Doughton declared, tho bill Introduced by Representative Harold Knutaon (It.-Mlnn.) nncl the President's own plan for a "cost of living" in- come tax cut offset by a now levy on corporations present "a choice "Thus fin- I have no Justltl- cntlon1 for rcntorittlon of an excess profltn he ,salcl. "There nhould bo n rcnxonnble tnx cut, but not ns much In tho Knutson bill." Treasury experts .iny tho O.O.P, proposal acttmlly would reduce fed- eral revenue by DoiiKhlon, who managed tax legis- lation when his party controlled mild that In opinion "thero urn too many federal em- Ho added: "Wo are upending too much and ton hlfih." Doughtnn Hnlcl ho not yet ready to Nay whether ho will vote fnr the KnuU'inn bill In Bplto of (ibjuotliinii to It, The iitniid ho ulti- mately takr-i will have a strong bearing on whether Republicans can attract enough Democratic sup- port to override n veto. That there Is virtually certain to it veto of tho O.O.P. meunurc WIIK matle cleitr Friday by Secre- tary of Mm Tritaiiiry John W, flny- der. UK thn election year tax battle mary drew this comment from Sen- ator Wayne Morse (R.-Ore.) "My view on the Oregon primary Is: 'The more tho I think It can serve as a very good political laboratory test of western sentiment If all of the aspirants for the nom- ination allow their names to go on the ballot." James Hagerty, a Dcwcy aide, said in Albany that tho governor "Is fully engaged with the work of tho legl.s- latlvo session and cannot actively seek tho nomination of his party for president, but If nominated he would accept." This confirmed a foregone conclu- sion that the Now York governor was available again for tho nomina- tion which won by virtual de- fault In 1944. The announcement gave Dewey backers encouragement for contests In other state primaries, including those In New Hampshire March D, Wisconsin' April 8, and Nebraska April 13. In New Hampshire, Dewey dele- gates will vie with supporters of former Governor Harold E, Stassen of Minnesota and a slato recently entered for General DwlKht D. retiring iiriny chief or staff. In Wisconsin a race Is shaping up Wallace said his candidacy wa not intended to elect "a reactionary Republican." He said he expectcc the Democrats would nominate Mr Truman. But to get Wallace support, hi said, any Democratic nominee would havo to be opposed to compulsory military training, and to the Tru- man doctrine in foreign affairs, and be pledged sincerely to seek peace with Russia, between delegates backing General Douglas MacArthur and Stnsscn, There is a possibility that nn Elsenhower slate may be entered there. Nebraska's primary seemed likely, however, to offer the first rounded test of major candidates. Efforts have been under way there io get all of the aspirants' names on the preferential primary list, In- cluding that of Senator Robert C. Taft of Ohio, Governor Earl War-i ren of California and possibly Sena- tor Arthur Vnndenberg of Michigan, who has denied repeatedly that he is a candidate. Attorney General Rules Against City of Austin 'St. W) The city of Austin cannot arbitrarily refuse a land- owner to permit to construct a building on property over which the city council may wish in the future to lay out an alley. Attor- ney General J. A. A. Burnqulst to- day advised K. A. Dunnette, Austin city attorney, "To deprive him of a legitimate Flrcmcn Pour of water on fire sweeping through a storage warehouse in congested wool and leather district In Boston. Officials estimated damage at in the five-alarm blaze. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Hiarriman Raps Easing Of U. S. Rent Controls Washington Secretary of Commerce William A. Harrl- man testified, today that relaxation of rent controls wouJd "di- rectly raise the cost of living and add to the pressure of de- mands." He further told a Senate banking subcommittee that "there is use of his itaid Burn-; very Indication that rents will rise larply unless effective controls arc ontlnucd." Harrlman said "releasing or eas- ig of controls" on this Important iclor'in the cost of living' will be nflntloimry" and "disruptive." The committee, headed by Sena- p- condemn thn hind, but when it con-lheitrlng testimony on leglhlatlon to dcmns It, it pays the damages as; extend controls beyond February opened before tho JIoiuo Wnys and committee, Communists Blamed for Brazilian Fire Illo iln .tnnrlro Tho war nilnlntry blamed communist nabot- today for a flrn which destroyed iii'iny headquarters Three Children Die in Illinois House Blaze required by the constitution. "The refusal to grant a perm- to build upon land for the rcaso that the city intends in the futur to appropriate this private prop crty to public use is an arbltrar exercise of authority not wnrrantc by our law." In answer to another Inquiry Burnqulst held that a plannin commission may be established bu that the planning commission ha no authority to lay out alleys. Such authority, he said, is vested In thi council. Dunnette also asked if the city by appropriate ordinance, can ob tain a 12-foot setback line by slm. ply reciting in the ordinance tlm hereafter no construction shall bi had on the 12 feet in question. "The result cannot be accom- plished merely by the passage of an ordinance without the payment o: such damages as the owner suf- Burnqulst held. 111. (it Iti Norlhemitorh Braxll Thursday, "Two Individuals of tho crlni" were arrested, both members nf thr extinct ComrmmlKt the ministry announced. rlson county said incomplete re ports indicated there had been quarrel nnd that about midnlgh Mrs, Lund.stcn loft for homo with out her coat, Lundsten and Solnrz fltnrted nftt tho young woman and reached For Rlploy without finding her. Tho retraced their route and found in body lying aloiiRnldo the ronrl. Danbury In BurneU enmity, Wl.t had an official temperature reading of 44 degrees bolow noro, Ladysmllh In Uu.sk county record (Continued on VUKI: .'I, Column X.) COLD WAVK Ilrciui.ir thr.'.e have not tiri-n admitted, and urn not now be. Ink- admitted, they wilt no doubt ilarm many Amcrlcaim who have ml thr reiilltloit >f the world Munition. Tti point of 'net. Aitirrleatm ahcmld tin relieved, Ihini itlurmed, by thr Kov- novel to tuke Ircislvr. hiirtl-liriidrii measurea to wifeKunrd American vltul Marshall Says Military Bases Not Asked in Plan Wn.'ililnjrloii Secretary of Htalo Clcorgo Marshall declared to- thut tho propojiod European recovery program now boforo Con- Kffiix not provldo for nor conteinplutn thu of mili- tary bn.-wi for tho United States In return for economic fuwl.stnnco to the countrlo.i." He made this ansortlon in a MtnU'tiU'iit Ijccau.io of reports roach- Inn the Mtuto department that great Interest jinct concern hod been aroused In Europe hy what the de- partment called "misquotations" of Secretary Forrcstal'n testi- mony before tho Senate foreign relations committee last Thursday, These department oflloial.i had led to ruparlx being published in Europo that Mar- shall was considering asking Amer- ican baacs in return for American nlr, or that American coordination of Western European defenses was a port of tho Marshall plan. drcn were burned to death in their! beds early totlay and three other members of tho family KUffereil third degree burns when fire de- stroyed their homo in Snydcr, six miles northwest of here. Dead were Marguerite Marrow, 13; Gladys, nine, and Sandra, five. Reported in fair condition at a hospital here were the parents, John More Casualties Three chii-jLisred in Jerusalem Jerusalem An official In- formant wild today bodies of 35 Jews and four Arabs were found by police nnd Investigat- ing Jewish-Arab lighting between Hebron and Bethlehem. Earlier Arab sourcc.s said as many Jews were killed In IlKhllr.g In the Jucleim hills. the The olllclal .said the bodies Marrow, 10, und 37, and found Hevun miles nnrt.li of other child, Leo Bight. iJalja village, An Ami: higher ox- Two other children, John, Jr., ijjccutlve source .said "Identity of and Linda Lou, three, escaped unin- jured, Delores Marrow, IB, was not at homo at tho time of the blaze. Coroner John Colo of Vermilion county said thu fire apparently re- sulted from an overheated stove. cards of 49 Jews killed Friday r.ight near Hebron" had been brought to the executive's Jerusalem office. beyond February 29, the date the present law Is due to expire. Harriman told the committee he docs not think that property own. ers are "unduly Buffering" under the present law, which, he said, is checking what in many cases could be called "unfair "I don't think that It Is unfair for' the government to step in and check profiteering In a necessity of he added. Harrlman reminded the senators that "the extension and strength- ening of rent control was a cardi- nal point" in the ten-point anti- nllation program presented to Con- gress by President Truman last No- 'ember. Doctors Gouging V.A. Program To Be Named Wiuhlncton The Veterans administration culled on the Amer- cun Medical association today to ferret out and punish any nonopcratlnB who have been "chiseling" to make: foil to terms with the railroads, oc- President To Be Warned Of Emergency Fact-Finding' Board May Hold Dispute Solution Cleveland David B. Ro- bertson, president ol the Brother- hood of Locomotive Firemen and Englnemen, said today he hoped presidential fact-finding board would find a solution to a dispute the nation's railroads which has led to February 1 strike call by three rail unions. Robertson reported Friday night Hint February C had been selected tor the stivrt of n, nation-wide rail walkout by union and two oth- em, following: breakdown In, medi- ation efforts in Chicago. Today, however, he said a committee from the three unions, mcetlnR In Chi- cago, had selected February l, at 6 p. m. To Advise Trunun Cftnlnnmi FranJc P. Douslnss of the- National (railway) Mediation board said In he would advise President Truman an emer- gency existed. Charles G. Ross, the President's secretary, said in Wash- ington a board probably -will appointed next week. The Brotherhood of Engineers and the Switchmen's TJnlon of North America joined with tho firemen In callins the atrtke. said Robertson, through a Joint committee appointed to arrange de- tnllii. A strike by tho three which claim a membership of more than woold affect about 240 railroads and switching yards In the country, Robertson esti- mated. Slop Truffle It appeared such a walkout would holt raJl- movement as completely as In May, 1646, when the Brother- hoods of Locomotive Engineers and Railroad Trainmen struck for 48 hours before capitulating to Presi- dent Truman's terms as troops being prepared to man the trains. Douglass said the Mediation board had been trying since Novem- ber 24 Jx3 settle the dispute tho three brotherhoods and cur- riers. The trainmen and IB other rail- road unions, representing about workers most of them extra money out of treating war veterans. Dr. Paul Ma'gnuson, new V-A, medical director, said he Is prcpar- ng a list of suspects which he will send to the A.M.A., which has igrced to turn the names over to tate medical societies. "I will name the men I suspect, because I want to find out whether each man Is a skunk, or what the circumstances Magnuson told newsmen late Friday. "If the doctors have a skunk In town the rest of the profession will be glad to smoke him out." He said the list Is a small one. It names -physicians accused of such tilings as overcharging the govern- ceptlng hourly pay boosts of cents. He testified as two more Tor medical care of veterans, cratlc senators, Barnet R. May- bank (S. C.) and J. W. Fulbrlght joined Senator John J Sparkman (D.-Ala.) in predicting here Is scarcely any chance Con- rcas will strengthen rent controls. Harrlman told the committee: "Rent is one of the largest Items tho consumers' budget. It is xccecled in importance only by ood. There Is every indication that will rise .sharply unless clTce- VB controlK are fixl.endud, II. would i; most unfortunate to Increase the rcssure on wage earners' Incomes a time when our every effort lould be In the other direction." continuing treatment longer than necessary and skimping on proper care of ailing men, Magnuson said the list will be kept secret unless the A.M.A. de- cides to give It out. Jn Seek to Rescue Kidnaped Official Athens Dispatches Athens newspapers said today that Greek national forces trying to rescue Lukas Koutxopctalos, kid- naped liberal member of parlia- ment, had captured 80 insurgents nnd liberated more than 200 peas- ants in tile Mount Paranossos area Koutsopetalos, seized by guerrillas 'our days ago, Is reported held un- Pair Plead Guilty to Four Charges at Eau Claire Ean ClaJre, men. were bound over to circuit court to- day for sentencing after pleading guilty to charges growing out of a series of robberies here lost month. Kenneth H. Schlegelmllch. 38, of Stevens Point, and Thomas P. Parks, 23. of Atlanta, Ga., were charged with armed robbery, assault with Intent to rob, burglary and breaking and entering: in the day- time with intent to commit larceny. The complaint charges that the pair and a 16-year-old companion since shot to death in Springfield. Dl., broke Into four residences, held up a filling station and slugged a man with a shotgun while robbing him. Weather dcr heavy guard. Try Your Skill on News Test Tonight How wiill Informed uro ynu on Wlnmiii, utatr, nnUnnnl and InlernutloniLl How well (lo you read your newspaper? Test your skill in current events by turning to The Re- publican-Herald and nnnwcr lent nn UIR editorial piDT" tniliiy, If you've paid ordinary at- tention to the top utorles In the past week or two you'll prob- ably rate pretty hljfh on thcsn qticxtlonN. The fiucxtloni arc not iKllckeni, but jirc to rc-emphUNlzo Important events in the ncirx. Try them out on the family tonight. Turn to the editorial page and tc.it your nklll. Current events teal will ap- pear every Saturday on Tho Republican Herald's editorial FEDKRAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Increasing: cloudiness and not so cold tonight; owe.st in the city, in rural ireas. Sunday, most.ly cloudy with rising temperature; highest 22. Light snow indicated Sunday night. and not so cold tonight with light snow begin- ning extreme north portion. Sunday cJoudy with snow flurries, north and central portion. Warmer south por- tion Sunday', but turning colder again north portion. and not so cold tonight, Sunday mostly cloudy with rising tempera- tures. Light snow extreme north portion by Sunday afternoon. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for tho hours ending nl, 12 m. today: Maximum, -2; minimum, -15: noon, precipitation, none; sun nets tonight at sun rises to- morrow lit TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Mnx. Mln. Prec. Bcmidjl......... -34 Chicago 9 Denver 22 DCS Mollies n Duiuth a 02 Reviving An Oh! "Mlssissip" custom, the giant towboats Helena and Kokodn jockey for position OB they prepared to cross the starting line for a race from New Orleans to St. Louis in the flrst major steamboat race on the river since 1870. At lost report, the Kofcoda had a 42-inile lead (A-P Wlrephoto to The Republican International Fall Kansas City 37 Los Angeles 73 Miami Mpls.-St. Paul 7 New Orleans ___ 62 New York........ 38 37 Phoenix 73 Washington 43 Edmonton 28 Regina Trace The 6 Winnipeg 7 9 1 7 -20 -28 53 G4 -1C 35 31 32 34   

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