Share Page

Winona Republican Herald: Friday, January 16, 1948 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 16, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER rold. Full Leased Wire Newi Report of The. Anociated IS COMING Be imrc your new radio can It, Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 280 WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING. JANUARY 16, 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES MATTER OF FACT Truman May Run Douglas Hy Joseph Mid Stewart Al.iop Wiuthlnclon Tho peculiar, in- termittent courtship between Am- erican polltlcii nnrt Juntlco William O, him entered a now uncl more elective, phase. Tho lunclorn or tho Northern .txrnocrntlo or- KimlxntloriM h ft vc sent word to tier Dounlu.'i that tho party's vlco pre.slclfinllal nomination i.'i his for the taking, wns curried, (tome time- ago. ittralght from n loaders' meeting In .New York to Douglas' chambcra In the gloomy of the Supreme court. Tho executive, director of the Democratic national commlttte. Gael SiilHvun, was the messenger. DouKln.t did not wel- come thin political tinnunclntlon, and given no subsequent Mgn of Intenllonii. But tho Demo- cratic leadcrn ttfl that if Trumnn eventually asks Douglas point blnnk to bo his running mate the Justice will bo forced to ac- crpt. Thsre In. of course, no sort of irunranty thtit the lencOirii' rmsiuiago to Douglnii wilt thus bo followed up by any request from tho White House. As .fur n.i President Tru- mnn pontonnlly In concerned, the ehoirc of hl.-i companion on the ticket Is sttll officially open. This will no doubt be asserted by tho President himself. Yet, whatever the President mny say will not do- tract from tho Mnirulnr Interest of the episode described nbove. Thrjr lire, flntt of nil. thn clrcumxmncr" or thp traders' dnlnlon. Tho Nrw York Krt- tonrtfirr held under the In- formul flhnlnnmwhlp of K.dwtird J. I''lynn. It reported to Iwrn mttended by from the xntrnplfn of Kil Kelly Juke Arvry In Illinois, Duvld LAWrrnop In I'maiylviuilH, llujrun In Nrw and onn or two more. In slinrt, thr unil powfim wrro iMwmnhlnd thiit I roil In int't In rcjrrl- Init both Jumrs F, llyrnni nnd Henry A. Wallace ,nnil In con- fwrrtnr thr vice-presidency on fl, Truman. The (I r ha ten of thn Mttrnpi were, ruther naturally, not for- mully rreorded. Yet It Is known two major points were jtenerally Kgreed upon. -13 Here Lowest for Winter Point 1 thnt Truman would nwd n running mnto linked to thii DraJ, rnthrr than H conserva- tive, in order to win thin your. J'dlnt 3 wns f.hnt Uio nomination Of such n running rnuto would bitter opposition Jn thn Bouthorn wlntt or the Democratic purty, but thnt HIM North riomicnwd the votes to Impost' a Norl.horn choice on thr convention. In both these points thn practiced political will rend much that In signifi- cant. The Northern lenders' Insistence upon ft New Dealer ngnln under- the fundamental change that him come over tlicso political organizations In the last lu years. In the days before Roo.iovclt, these orgiinizmions worr tho consorvutlvo element in thn Democratic party. They relied on potty favors to hold tho maw of their voters In tho pre- cincts, nnd In Washington wore Kind enough to take ft right-wing line. Now, however, thn mass vote of the big cities can only bo tit- trnctrd by progressive personalities nnd programs. The loaders of the Severn! old line German commu- Farley Raps Two Die in Minneapolis Wallace; Taft Blasts Budget Ohioan Suggests Bigger Air Force Instead of U.M.T. Boarding Home Blaze Minneapolis Two elderly persons died and three others wore Injured seriously today in a lire which swept a two-story frame at 2305 Portland By Jack Bell boarding house avenue. A fourth person injured in the j blaze was treated at a neighboring home. The dead were identified as Har- ry Smith, 66, and a Mr. Johnson Washington a widower between 70 and 80 years moved to store up their defenses nge- agatnst raids by Henry A. Wallace The'two story frame structure, today as Senator Robert C. Taft formerly a private residence, was (R.-Ohio) hammered at what he (being operated as a rooming house called President Truman's "war for nconle bv Mrs. Joscnhlnc spending" budget. Tart, who In seeking the G.O.P. presidential nomination, told the for elderly people by Mrs. Josephine Erlckson. Mrs. Erlctaon discovered tho flrc shortly before noon when she de- Providence, R. I., Republican club'tec ted smoke coming from a nrst Thursday night that floor hot air register, can be cut off the President's budget for the year be- ginning July I. of Iowa Home Escape Fire Tuff, proposed an Innrcawc in air Mlulrld( of the ap- proximately 05 residents of the Iowa Lutheran home for the aged corps funds as an alternative to universal military training and a cut in foreign aid pending plans. He accused the rcasury of juggling figures to pre- ent a tax cut last year and de- nar.dcd a cut now in individual ncome levies. Farley in Virginia Meanwhile James A. Farley, Democratic national chairman dur- ng the first two terms of Franklin Roosevelt, lushed out at Wallace a speech at Lynchburg, Va. He H.-ild the third party candidate ad failed to find "happiness" in were removed to safety here today when fire broke out In the attic and raged out of control. Four lire departments fought the fire but were hampered by exijcme- ly low water pressure. The residents, some of whom were bed-ridden, were being housed tem- porarily in the Lutheran church. Richard Lynn, who lives at 2301 Portland avenue, rushed to the house as Mrs.? Erlckson spread the alarm and rescued1 Miss Helen Dahlgrer., 04. He smashed the glass in a window in her first floor room" at the rear of the building and pulled her to safety. Lynn also assisted in the rescue of Mrs. Alma Wliiqulst, 85. Neither woman was Injured. Albert Lind, another resident, was rescued, and apparently es- caped injury. Firemen carried three persons from the building. Among them was Mrs. Augusta Martinson, who suf- fered from the effects of smoke.j All were taken to General hospital. Very Cold Tonight Is Forecast Main Highways Open, Drifting Blocks Side Roads The Winona mercury dipped to a chill winter lowpoint of early this morning and by noon had risen to only lowest noontime reading of the winter. The figure Is the low since February 4, 1947, when the mer- cury read Snowfall during; the 24-hour period ending at noon Loday totaled half an inch. Forecast, for the Winona area, calls for fair and continued very cold weather tonight with dimin- shing winds. A low of to s called for in the rural areas, Saturday will be partly cloudy and 'cry cold. High winds closed several area ratlc parties and expressed the ope "now that he has a party of is own, ho can be happy In it and yal to It." Farley said it "seems to be a ic-man pnrty" and may "end as a ne-mait party." Talt leveled most of his fire Two Men Were Seriously injured Thursday when flre swept through a General Mills, Inc., pressure miuccptin plant In wuth, Minneapolis Officials of tho company estimated damage "Jn excess of 000." At loft, firemen iiro playing water on tho exterior of a mlllwork company plant which not severely damriKQd. Press Photo to Tho Republican-Herald.) Communist Plan Strike to Wreck Marshall Plan reported commu- nist master otrlko scheme to wreck tho Marshall plan threatened today to Germany's industrial heart: Tho Ruhr. Hunger, gripping weary workers, many of whom are living on n starvation diet, became an ally of tho Comlnform, whose alms wcro alleged to have been revealed In a mysterious "Protocol M" docu- ment, published Thursday in some German nuwrpapers, SlmultancoLi.ily. sput- tering political situation boiled up. Democratic orminliintlon.i privately cherish the wholly con.wrvatlvu opinions which they have nlwny held, Thrlr nttltude -WII.H admirably up tiy our of tho Imrd- pr-hnllril lirnohmrn (if ttin ly-Arvcy orKMtlzntlnn, lit the ronrlftvo which rhcwr Ihi- nhlo n.i the Drmiicrit- llr jtrnnlnrlnl mmilnrn In nols. wns rrjcotnl for thr irovcrnomhlp nomination (which went to Adlal Steven- son) hrruu.in he (mil fmiclH tlin too hard In tile The organization men roulil not hear the tliouitht of' Oourliu pnsslnie mil thd JoliM In Sfirlncnrlil, hut could JIIHI hrluic Ihrmjirlvrit to nungiort him for thr .Semite, liiiril-hiillnil horifhninn In iiiimtlon put tlin jrrnrrjil vlriv Ypr.v nimbly: "I hAtP UIP lilitnk hliink Kuts of thn lilunk hliirik. Hut I'm for him hreutisp irutybp tin win." As thp foregoing rpnuirk xug- gnU. thp proicrpislvlxm of (ho northprn siitrupH IH In furl ulrlrlly rnnllnrd to rnnjnii unit parly pliitformi, It U utriklngly almpnl from tliplr to tho rnvl of (fovprnmnnl. Hrnre renull such oddities nn Ktl- wurd J. Flynn's support of Corn- miwionrr Kdmoiul Hunrutiitn for thp chulrmanshlp of the Securities Kxchango commission. There 1.' hero a certain amusing Irony, Justice Douglas, whom I'Mynn WIIIUM for the vlce-prffildrticy, wns onct thr llwhtlni; leader of r.hn S.K.C. while Knnruhnn fnvnrcd for tin 8.K.C, by jiri' thr business Uttcri'sts wiiotn Doug- Ift-i oncn fought. This kind of thing Is the noiirc'p of the curious personality of thf Triiniiui Hdmln- Istrntlon. Yet evrrt In Word And conservatism in deed is enough to inflame the feelings of the South- ern Democrats. The Southerners shortly bo aroused into a fury of Indignation by u strong Truman messnjic on nntl-dlscrlmlmitlon leg- nlsts rovealocl they hticl upllt with MoKcoW'dli'ecicd communists and formt-d an opposition party, Tho Moscow radio added Its bit to thn Ruhr's turbulent political pot by broadcasting a r.pccial pro- gram to hungry Ruhr miners sock- ing to provn that the way to more potatoe.-i was through the Commu- nist, party, Thn Ruhr, which has remained comparatively quiet slnco last win- ter's food riots, sprang suddenly Into tho nuropean picture when the calory sub.siKtcncu ration leve: dropped In miiny places to and even levels. Although British-American food mports rmvo been on schedule, col- from Clnrman fanners have Minneapolis Two workers remained in hospitals today, one of thum reported in critical condition, after a fire late Thursday destroy- ed a Mlllfl, Inc., appliance plant with loss estimated at more than Gregory J. Martin, 35, Bobbins- dale, was reported In poor condi- tion, and Daniel Wysong, 28, Paul, In fair condition ns a result'telephone today that rioting Chin of burna. Several other employesjosc mobs had injured six Britons British Consulate At Canton Burnec By Chinese Mobs Hong TJ. S. con sul general at Canton reported bj received minor hurts as they fled ;he three-story structure at 3127 Hiawatha avenue. Company officials said they be- levcd the blaze started when a park from a buffing machine Ig- nited nearby oil. A second version of the fire's origin was that a worker had placed 'a heated sauce- pan Into a vat of oil, which flared up immediately. The factory, employing about 100 worlcors, was set up last July. Fire- men kept the Ilamcs from spread- Ing to the neighboring E, IE, Bach MllUvork, Company. lot, American blamed German ollf- clnl.t for failure to collect. Ger- man Jn turn blamocl the military for not glv- 'ng tlii'fn power to enforce collec- IOIIH. AKuln.it Uio nclvlce of their union ami military Ruhr workers have, launch' (1 protest Ktrlkes, Starting with Thursday, he ranks of tho utrlkcni appeared They arc sore an bears Although Justice DouRlnx Islntlon, Hlrcady. is popular with many of them, the Southerners will like no choice Imposed by tho North. o bn swelling woll tho mark today and a general strike nvolvlng most, of tho threatened tho entire Ruhr. Arrcntcd or Deportation WiiNhlnjrlnn The Justice department today announced tho arrest for deportation of Alexander Blttolmtin of New York, a national commUteuman for the Communist party in tho United States. Tho mild Dlttolmiin In u Humilnn alien uutl It Is alleged thnt litt "boilnvas In, advl.ios, advo- cates and teuches" tho violent over- throw of tho United States gov- ernment. Canada Resumes Price Controls On Meat, Butter Ottawa Canadian con- sumers, beset by steadily soaring living costs, looked for at least par- tial relief today in the government's relmposltlon Thursday night ot price control.-! on meat nnd butter. In addition. UJH Kovnniment It will ask Parliament to extend rent controls until March 31, HMO. Controls on meat and butter wore lifted last fall, and Nlncc that time prices have climbed, pccompanlecl ay the angry protests of consumers. In Ottawa, butter is currently KClllng for 73 cents a pound whole- sale, and residents who have a fan- cy for good beefsteak find It priced at 00 to 05 cents. (Butter costs consumers around 05 cents a pound In New York city and steak costs them from 65 to DO cents a pound.) Finance Minister Dougla.s Abbott, who announced the relmposltlon of controls on tho two prime staples burned the British consulate and threatened American property dur- ing a three-hour demonstration. The British dispatched a war- ship to Canton to evacuate Brit- ons, if necessary. The Chinese were reported incensed over the eviction by the British of Chinese from the walled city of Kowloon on the mainland of this crown colony. H. A. Boucher, U, S. consul gen- eral at Canton, said no Americans were Injured, but reported: "On a number of occasions, Americans were threatcnt'd but saved by satisfactory identification. The Texas Compr.ny building would have been set-afire had not the American flag been Boucher snld the British consulate and the chartered Bank of India, Australia and China were "smoul- dering ruins." The riot was reported to have started soon after r.oon near the British consulate. Some demon- strators wore the uniform of the Chinese youth corps. lursday night against the Truman Imlnlstratlon and the Democrats the domestic front. He said although the President's udge.t calls for taxes that will take per cent of thu nation's Income, Truman is "not satisfied with nt, and is proposing a new one- ilf of one per cent payroll tax r a compulsory health insurance ogram, Ho mid that while tho Pi-osidcnt now estimates a surplus for thn current; government year, Hummer "the President and the. secretary ot the treasury In- G.O.P. Tax Cut Veto Virtually Promised Secretary of, the Treasury John W. Snydcr today virtually promised the Republican thai; the surplus would be only mid on that l.hn Pmildrsnt vcl.rx-d twn tax reduction bllld." Aj.lt Correct "It scums to infi we an; entitled have correct figures without ef- forts to Influence public opinion for administration Taft said. "It appears now that there never was a justification for vetti- ng the tax reduction bill. Taft got a political boost Thurs- day when Colonel R. B. Creager, Texas G.O.P. national committee- man, said in Philadelphia that his state's delegation to the Republican convention will be uninstructed but t expected to back Taft. There was other evidence that ,he -Democrats were weighing the Wallace threat to Mr. Truman's political future and taking steps to io something about it. controlled Congress that Prcslden Truman will veto any attempt tc reduce income taxes without boost ing other federal revenues. Ho laid what looked like an ad ministration ultimatum before thi House ways and means committee whose O. O. P. majority is in passing a tax-cutting measure quickly. It went like this: "The revenue loss resulting from any tax adjustments should be off- set by upward revisions In other taxes. There must be no rcductlor in aggregate revenue." Snyder said the President's own plan a income tax cut for each taxpayer and dependent matched by a new bite of corporation profits which ex- ceed a prewar average, would fill the bill. But he declared a measure by Chairman Harold Knutson (R.- Mlnn.) of the wnyN nnd moans com- nilUm, to cut Incomf! taxcii wll.houl. miilclnx up l.lio JiMin would wlpo out purl, of this yi'ar'H budutit surplus and create a deficit in Hits 131ft fiscal period starling July 3. Furthermore, Snyder declared, the Knutson bill would cost the government a year in- stead of the estimated by the Mir.nesotan. Is This News? Dewey Will Be Candidate Albany, N, Y. Governor Thomas E. Dcwoy will accept the Republican presidential nomination if it Is offered him at the Philadel- phia national convention next June James C. Hngerty, executive as- sistant to tho governor, said in a statement "I nm informed that a group of Governor Dewey's friend: in Oregon have entered his name in the preferential primary In the state." It was tho first formal statement on the 1848 presidential nomination by any member of the Dewey staff. Dewey later confirmed that; he was an avowed candidate for the nomination. Boston Fights Blaze ItoKlnn A Kixictncular fivc- Ilru wn'ckrd u hi-uvlly- and state highways 76 and 43 In the Winona area were open. The county highway department had, no report on the condition of county roads at noon today. Buses were running on. time. 25 Below at Betnldjl Statewisc, Bcmidji was the cold- est spot last night, recording a low of Other 3ow were, at Alexandria nnd W11I- mnr. International FnJl.s, 21 at Duluth, at St. Cloud. 18 in the Twin Cities and in Rochester. In Wisconsin the mercury fell throughout the state last ight, with western and northwest- ern sections feeling the frigid blasts during the early evening and east- ern and southeastern communities getting them during early Superior reported a 20 below zero reading at 0.-30 a. m. today. same time La Crosse listed ten be- ow and Park Falls a minus 11. Badger forecasts call for fair and 'very cold" weather tonight, with ows ranging from IS to 20 in the northwest and nve to 5 below in the southeast: Satur- ay will be partly .cloudy and cold itto highs of five below m the northwest and. ten above In thr outhcast. Increasing nd "slowly rislnR temperatures- re on tnp tor Sunday. Cold Over of V. 8. Nationally, the bitter cold cover- d a wide area from the Eastern Cockles to the North AUnntic. Vhllo tiomn nrctlons of tho Gsilf itockort five-story leather wiu-'o today i.him yesterday, the mercury iou.su In the downtown district and nvaded an adjoining wool cstab- Ishment before it was controlled ast night. Owners estimated the oss at More than 50 persons trapped he fourth and fifth floors of the leather warehouse, owned by the "The cold facts Snyder said, Armour Leather Company, made "that present economic way to safety over fire es- budgetary considerations, inflation-1 capes. ary pressures and debt management problems require the maintenance of government revenues at present levels." In his prepared statement a. opening witness at the committee'; tax hearings Snyder stopped shor Vandenberg Says ,oan Protective Would Help Plan Washington Senator Ar- thur Vandenberg sug- gested today that "half the criti- cism" or the European recovery pro- gram would disappear If means arc provided so tho United States "can follow our dollars abroad and see of calling President Truman's plan the only one the administration will accept. Youngdahls Visit in Swedish Palace Stockholm, nor and Mrs. Luther W. Youngdahl of Minnesota were received In lorm- al audience today by King Gustav of Sweden in his Stockholm royal castle, They were accompanied by H, Freeman Matthews, U. S. ambassa- dor to Sweden. They spent 18 minutes inside the castle. Youngdahl said he told the king Another report from Canton said we are getting our money's worth, .jlc appreciated the "boundless all British women and children The Senate foreign relations com-1 friendliness" ncc< would bo fivacuntcd Immediately nml'mltlnc chairman made the in Sweden. that HUbNuriuciUly all Britons would In Shanghai, students of two afti.T .John .1. McCloy, president of thu Intornnllonal bank, recommend- ed that "no fuw.y loans" bo mndej Six firemen were injured anc many who became icc-encrustcd battling the blaze in 20-dcgree tem- peratures also required first aid for exposure. Wisconsin Court to Test Vet Housing Act Madison, WIs. The Wis- consin supreme court agreed today to take original Jurisdiction in a test suit involving constitutionality of the state veterans' housing act, and will hear argu- ments on merits of the case Fri- day. February 20. The case came before the court ifter the slate veterans' housing ooard requested E, C. Glessel, state Budget director to release in Housing funds to the Port Wash- .ngton housing authority, Giesscl re- ruscd, on ground that spending state money for housing might be considered a violation of the con- dipped below freezing as far south an northern Florida. Below freezing marks were re- ported _today in Georgia, the Caro- Florida and Vlr- wcre not as low as yesterday. At Miami, Fla.. where the mercury dropped to yester- day, the low today was 43 but in Tallahassee. Fla., it dipped to Atlanta's 22 compared to a mini- mum of 11 yesterday. Most of the Pacific coast and Mountain states escaped the cold weather. The 79 in Los Angeles yes- terday was the nation's highest. Weather ititutlonal provision forbidding ex- unlvcr.sltlcs begun a two-rlny strike under the Marshall plan "in order, In protest against the evictions, which began acvcral days ago. Tho British ordered do.structlon to a void the consequences of thej English loan." McCloy referred Lo the purposes. of shacks on Kowloon, on the main-1 ooo loan by the United States to land of the crown colony, for health Great Britain as "ineffective." He said thnt loan has been criticized here, and In England because there wa.s a "lack of knowledge." ns to "what the money was used for." VnndenbcrK, apparently agree- ing, saicl that if a Joan protective Frances Perkins Will Address Wisconsin Group Madison. Wis. Prances Gandhi Passes 80th Hour of 'Fast for Peace' Xcw Delhi Mohandas K, Oiinclhl passed his 80th hour of fasting tonight. His physicians an- nounced he had a god sleep lost night, und added: "His general condition remains ho mime except thn arc not uncllonlng properly and ellmlna- lon defective." Thursday night, said n celling price would be fixed on butter in a day or two, pegged on a wholesale price per pound in Montreal of 07 cents. It will take about two weeks to evolve a meat celling, he said. Truman Blasts Kuter Rejection Tru- man today described as a "dis- service" to the country a Senate committee's rejection of legislation to let Major General Laurence S. Kutcr serve as chairman of the Civil Aeronautics board while get- ting military pay. Mr. Truman expressed his views to Chairman Chan Ourncy (R.-S. D.) of tho Senate armed services committee which voted unanimously against the legislation. Perkins, former secretary of labor, will headline a number of guest' speakers to appear at University of. Wisconsin Women's Selr-Govern- mont association's 50th anniversary celebration February 23-2B. Russians Treat U. S. Officers With 'Hostility' Vienna, Austria TJ. S. array officials said today Russian Koldlcra arrRKlud two officcrx :it- taclind to the American li'.Kii- tlun In UudupCKl Wednesday ut tho Hungarian town of Papa, brought them to Vienna and finally released them early Thursday morning. They Were Lieutenant Colonel Peter J. Lopciak, assistant mili- tary attache, and Lieutenant Colonel Kcrn.ird Thiclcn. An army Mild the two wcro lit'Jd IncommunicjKlo and treated with "hostility." (European Recovery this "would do more to satisfy the American public than anything thnt can be done." McCloy told the committee the International bank staff has screen-j ed the proposed ap-l propriatlon and has concluded It is I not an extravagant figure. 'We feel, rather, that It IB a tight fit." IIK added. McCloy said the World bank 1. making "hard Joans" and is able to check up on its loans without com- plaints from nations borrowing its funds. Hi: outlined how the bank serving -10 nations "everywhere but is set up and how it makes loans. Vnndcnberg said that language could be inserted'in to the bill stat- ing that the continuity of American aid depends on the progress Eu- ropean countries make toward re- covery and the results that come from their efforts to carry out the promises thoy make In individual agreements with the United States. FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Pair and continued very cold tonight with diminishing: wind; lowest in rural areas. Saturday, partly cloudy and quite cold; highest eight o ten. WEATHER FORECASTS Minnesota Generally fair and severely cold tonight with low tem- peratures 15 to 30 below. Saturday partly cloudy. Not so cold west and north portions. Wisconsin Pair and very cold tonight. Low temperatures :s to 20 below in the northwest nnd 5 to 15 below in the southeast half of state. Saturday partly cloudy and cold." LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for tho 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 30: minimum, noon, precipitation, .04 inch of sun .sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at EXTENDED FORECASTS Wisconsin and Minnesota: Tem- peratures average ranging from near normal in extreme west to three to five degrees below normal In Wisconsin; normal maximum 14 northern to 32 southern; normal minimum six below zero northern to 13 above southern; cold Friday night, sJowly moderating tempera- tures in Minnesota Saturday and all sections Saturday night nnd southern sections Sunday; colder In northern section Sunday and all sections Monday; warmer again Wednesday. Precipitation average about one-fourth inch in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin; snow flurries in northern section Satur- day night and eastern sections Sun- day nnd Monday. TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min, Prec. BemldJI o Chicago 3G 4 Denver 44 15 Des Moines 39 3 Dululh ia International Palls 1 Kansas City 40 8 Los Angeles 79 58 Miami 51 41 Mpls.-St. Paul ___ 32 New Orleans 53 33 New York 21 16 Seattle 36 32 Regardless Of The Season sign painting goes on, and there was Washington" no exception in Minneapolis today when, with the thermometer rcg- Edmonton l istcrlng ten below zero, Buy Bell of General Outdoor Advertising Beglna 1 Company docs a touch up job on a sign designed to let the folks The 7 -20 know the temperature. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Winnipeg 3 -13 01 04 1   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication