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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, January 13, 1948 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 13, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                EATHER Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press FM IS COMING Be rare jonr new radio can tt. Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 277 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 13. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES MATTER of FACT What Will Happen If Stalin Dies? By ph nml Strwtirt Aluop of the Impending death of General- issimo Josef Stulln urn nn annual crop, and thr present heavy harvest produced the customary reac- tions among thn American experts. They will the story when U him been officially announced, Ncv- erUirlnifl, n 1 n c I. li p rxpnrlnLltm (hut. Htnlln nHl.Hl witrin cloy flic an Important, point of Trip American foreign policy. It seems to be worthwhile to set down the known facts. In the flrnt jilncc, those Ameri- cans who hnve thn bont moans of forming n Judgment consider that Stnlm hn.i been fiir from complete- ly well for some years. At one, of the wartime conferences, he actual- ly confessed to President that he hud trouble with both his heart nnd lungs. After Tehran his plunr was unexpectedly groundot nt Baku, whence he by rail to Moscow, The reason for this, and his subsequent rofUMil to travel un.vwhcre by air, Is thought to have been the sharp effect on his lungs of flying at lUtlludo. In the second place, however, the wimr.men wrlmlt that Stalin may lust n lone while yet. As his frc- ejurnt trips to Sochi Indicate, he hiut been taking excellent care of hlm.wlf since thr end of tho war. Ills holidays Invigorate him greatly when Hecrrtnry of Commerce Avere.ll Hnrrlmun vlwltcd Sochi clur- Intr the greatest of nil outbursts of "Stalin Is dying" tnlk, ho found the ItuJwilun dictator looking better thnn he, hud for years. And nvcry- one who hns ever seen Stalin re- gards him as one of tho toughest upccimrns of the tough Georgian race. Thus there Is no tolling whether this crop of rumorg, or the .next one, or the one after that nwy be right or wrong. Will Produce Chanfo Meanwhile, whatever reliable facts can be obtained on Stalin's health have an lntorp.it far greater thnn mere gossip, Stalin's death Is In fitct considered likely to produce cruinBrs In Bovlet policy. Tho nr- gumnnt for this vlow Is us follown: After Stalin l.i removed from the ncene, the experts expect the Fire at Taylor, Wis. Rocket-Powered, Unmanned Sleds Travel M.P.H Muroc Air Huso, Calif. Cracking of tlio wall of sound by unmanned rocket-powered Hindu which Nlrmikcd over rall- road tracks nt more than miles nn hour has been dls- nlostxl by Northrop aircraft cn- Tlln nlmlft wrirn prupnllflil In nrcrrt oxprrlinriillil riinx over feet of standard (faunc track In lens than two seconds to break through tho M.P.H. (HCU level) sonic harrier. were started 15 months The pound Hindu were powcircd by five Molld-fucl rock- ets, each developing of thrust for 1.8 seconds. Northrop mild the rocket died reached of M.1MI. In the first test September 20, 1046. The fiwtcfit run of M.P.1I. wax recorded last March 7. Gandhi Starts Dangerous Fast Hopes for Peace control of tho Soviet Union to pass to sort of inner committee of the Politburo. According to this theory, Molotov will be stalln'n of- ficial heir, Inheriting thn outward trappings of lender of the Soviet Mate, lierla, meanwhile, will con- trol the changed but un- MOHANDAS K. GANDHI New Delhi, India Mohan dns K, Gnndhl started a life-en dnngcrlng fast for communal peac In Delhi and India today, Tho Indian patriot and prophe of nonviolence, frail and 70, reject ccl last-mlnuto appeals from Hindu Sikh and Moiilum delegations tha he give tho people 15 days to re chunking secret police; tho Russian store- pence before beginning h Communist party will bo headed by Zdhanov, hero of tho Comlnform organization meeting; and to But- Eonln will go tho leadership ot tho Russian military forces. In other words, whlln Molotov will got t.ho trappings of power, the fundamen- tal Icvrrs of command will bo hold by three, Juniors among tho Politburo's Inner group. History tenches, and Inn believe, thnf. thrrr rnn bo no blllty in this quadripartite division of tho powt-r tit nn autocratic atnte. Whnt Is anticipated was by George Kennnn, Stnto depart- ment planner. In his famous "Mr, X" article. Them will be a con- flict, paralleling tho conflict that convul.oed Rome after the clofith of Augustus. Then the Homan Im- perial house, tho Senatorial plutoc- racy, thu state bureaucracy and the legions fought it out together, un- til only thr legions svirvlvcd to rule the empire. The Inevitable similarities of the that will obtain In Mos- cow after Stalin's death are strik- ingly obvious. Moreover. In this modern case, the, conflict should bo rendered all the more, embittered by each of thn tlifterent forms of slate power being personified irt n single. Individual. Thn prediction Is thnt thin inner conflict will niKu in the Kremlin from the clay of sunn's funeral for an indetermin- ate but probably considerable period. There will probably be several per- mutations nncl first three against one, then one against two, and so on. And nt last an- other sole ruler will be chosen for the Soviet Union by tho ruthless law of the survival of the fittest. tor 1'mrcr fast. Ho received them In tho gar den of n millionaire friend's horn here. "You must prefer Gandhi or law Icusnoss. You can't have both, doleKatlon members said he told them. They added ho asserted lifi had no valuo nor attraction with out, poncn nnd love. Promptly nt 31 a. m. Qnndh pointed to tho remnants of his breakfast of goat's milk and vege- tables, from which ho had been exiting sparingly, and snlcl, "Tnkc It away. It Is time." He limed tho start of the fast exactly with his watch, Hu then rinsed his mouth with water and held a brief prayer .service for his assembled friends. Ho awkod the people, Including tho Hindu, Sikh and Moslem dele- to leave him then, and he went indoors to follow his normal routine of reading mall, dictating messages to his followers and close- ly studying current events in news- pnpors. In undertaking his fast, Gandhi said it "will end when and if I am satisfied that there is a reunion of the hearts of all communities, brought about without any outside premurc, but from an awakenec sonso of duty." Graham Made Cotton Deals In December Trades Followed Truman Warning on Speculation Gen- eral Wallace H. Graham testified today that he got out of the wheat for one small trade President Truman commodities speculators last Octo bcr. But he said he continued t deal In cotton until December 18. Under oath before the Serial appropriations committee, the Pres dent's personal physician said, too ,hat he assumed personal rcspon Ability for tho trades. Previously 10 had said publicly In a mcnt that his broker made com nodlty purchases for him wlthou1 s knowledge. Dcalu Cloned Out Graham told the committee that 1 or his dealings on the com- exchanges. Including cot- on and cottonseed oil, were closd ut December 18. Grnham, who previously said he ad 'Most his socks" in exchange radlng, presented a statement that e hntl made a profit of commodities. But lie unld he ost In Ktock trading and 0 had a net loss of He added that his broker's rec- rds showed that all the transnc- onH made for Ornhnm in wheat were closed out October 1047, or Burlier "except one mailer percentage of whont pur- hasos and this was closed out by 10 end of October." He denied he had any Information on government com-" modlty purchasing, Graham's original public stor wan that after Mr. Truman's bias nt commodity he asked his broker if he had any commodi ties and immediately ordered them sold. Challenged by Stassen This account was challenged fa- Harold E, Stassen, aspirant for the Republican presidential nomination who said Graham did not tret out of tho market until lifter Stnssen inquired whether any White House Republican-Herald photo Only The South Wall And Part of another remained standing at Taylor, Wls., today after a fire swept through a 50 by 100-foot building, driving two families into a cold night and destroying three businesses. Later the walls were leveled. personnel trading. was engaging in such Speculative trading In commodi- ties is entirely legal, but Mr. Tru- man contended that "gambling1 was running up the price of grain. Some grain exchange men dispute that contention. Two Ships Save 46 Survivors Df U. S. Transport New York All -1C mirvlvorfi who abandoned tho nrmy'n flamo- wept funeral transport Joseph V. were safe todny nbonrd wo other vessels after a dramatic CSCUB from lifeboats In which they ad tossed for 11 hours In raging Trumpet Player Admits Knifing Cleveland Girl slender filling station attendant who likes to play the trumpet told Baltimore police Monday night he 'killed eight-year-1 early today, killing five and old Sheila Ann Tuley with a kitchen i irlg, four Five Die in Plane Crash Near Washington, D. C. Washington An Eastern Airlines plane with nine persons aboard crashed on the outskirts of Washington during a rainstorm its What Interests tho experts abou these struggles is. of course, the.l probable eiTect upon tho Sovle Ktnte nnd power, Tho bo.it predica- tion is that thr form of tho Sovle will remain nlwnys outward! unaltered, whatever (lurk molndrn ma may be rnncH'fl within th Kremlin's guarded walls. IJut in such striiKglc.i, Ihr start Ing points, at least ostensibly, arc always disputes over policy, in tho similar content which took place after the drath of Lenin, both the Soviet bureaucracy, utid tho Com- munist parties nt homo and nbront were constantly rent arid riven by policy dis.puler.. These were- chiefly mere outer mnnlfestntlons of tlu Stalin-Trotsky rivalry. Yet the ond result was the temporary crippling of tho Communist parties outside tho Soviet union, nnd a drastic chnnse, in the Soviet Union's for- eign policy, Tho Stalin theory nf "Socialism In one country" was offi- cially adopted, whlUt tho NKVD hounded all dissenters to tho fit- ting end of heretics. No wonder.Stnlln's health Is now a subject of such intense Interest; for his death is nlso considered likely to result In another groat change In the direction of Soviet policy. No one Is predicting whether the change will be for better or for worse, but nil are hoping for the beat. I Cashton Motorist Dies of Injuries Ln C'rnssr, B5-yenr- old motorist, whoso car was struck by u southbound Milwaukee Road combination freight-passenger train at Cash ton Monday, died in a hospi- tal hero Monday night. Ho was Hclmuth E. Conrad or Cashton. 'orth Atlantic1 seas. Rescue of the 46 olly's 45 crewmen and completed Monda, Ight nftcr an all-day air and se: earch for .the survivors wh bandoncd their blazing ship In i prthcnst gale some 900 miles cas New York. The men were picked up by the rmy transport General R. E. Cal- n and the Black Diamond line's nlon Victory which sped to the one after intercepting the strickon onnolly's calls for help earlier in e day. Long-range air force anes from Kindley field in Ber- muda nldod In the rescue. Cause of tho fire, which originated In the Connolly's engine-room, lind not been said. knife in Cleveland New Year's day when she resisted his advances. "She began to scream and I lost my Harold Beach, Jr., 23, recounted in a-police headquarters filled with detectives and newspapermen. The little girl's body, the dres torn and covered with blood, wa :ound on a neighbor's porch, les ,han a block from her house. She had disappeared earlier In he day while on her way to a drug tore to get cifmrettes for her father Edward J. Tuley, 34, a machinist, Capluln of Henry J Krls.4 Haiti Bench, a bespcutacluc 140-poundcr who stands llvc-fcct- four, was arrested Monday while changing a tire at a fllllng station where ho had worked since coming p to Baltimore Saturday. the Con-i He went over his story with Kriss other police officials and newsmen Monday night. He smiled a great deal and once or twice laughed out loud at questions put to him. Asked if he understood what he had done, Beach shrugged his shoulders, grinned nnd re- plied: "The most I can get is so Beach told Baltimore police he had not como here to escape arrest but to sett his mother. "I knew I wouldn't get away with It. I'd left fingerprints all over." He said "before all this happened, wanted to bo a play the trumpet." He told how he had determined, the Callan Army Barge Reported Sinking- Near Alaska Const guard head- quarters announced today thru a self-propelled army bo.rge, with an unknown number aboard, was re- ported sinking near tho Alaska peninsula. The plane, en route from Hous- ton, Texas, to Boston, plowed into a grove of trees on the Maryland side of tho Potomuc river a few mllus from the National airport shortly after reporting it was com- ing In for a landing. The twin-engine DC-3 was de- molished, but there was no fire. The cause has not been determined. The dead were three passengers, the pilot and co-pllot. Three injured passengers and the flight attendant were taken to Casualty hospital In Washington, The five dead were Identified by the airline as: S. M. Warner and W. A. Morehcad of Clinton, 8. C., L. A. Brandt (no Captain Paul Saltanis, pilot, and Ralph B. Sanborne, Jr., co-pllot. The Injured were Identified at the hospital as: Navy Cnptnln Luclan Mocbus, 47, Maxwell Field, Ala., head injuries; Peter L. Phllos, 22, flight attendant of Astoria, N. Y., head nnd Jeg Injuries; Eugene G. Stone, 24, Pen- sacola, Fla., head Injuries; and Morris Maple, 24, Princeton, N. J., second and third dcfree bums. Convicted Man Admits or Knows Of 44 Murders Tacomn, Wash. The num- ber of murders which Jake Bird, the ax-swlnplng transient who Is scheduled to die on the gallows Friday morning, says he committed j or could "clear up" increased to 44 of them confirmed. Pierce County Prosecuting Attor- icy Patrick M. Steclc disclosed In a 178-page transcript and a letter o Governor Mon C. Wallgren the 6-year-old Negro's latest tale of, i trail of Wood reaching from New York to Los Angeles and extending ack to 1323. All of the confirmed murder embraced in an original four' confession disclosed here on earned to piny the instrument'January 3. They Included the slay- while serving In a New York stateiinS of three in South Bond, Ind, nstitution for delinquents from 19411 In September, 1942, nnd one at to March, 1D47, He added rather proudly that he ad been lender of the Institution's band. Beach declined to state why he had been confined, but Cleveland police said they had learned he had crvcd n term for a sex offense on .n 11-year-old boy. This Is What's Left of a Milwaukee road locomotive after the boiler exploded, killing the fireman and seriously Injuring the engineer. The. cxplosi on took place near Portage, Wls. The boiler was blown 14 feet clear of the wreckage, 145 feet ol track were torn up and two of the eight cars, combina- tion PasSCngCl'-frClirht. Worn nnp plco HrHnrnH (-ATD tlon passenger-freight, wore derailed. Herald.) No one else was injured. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republlcan- Highland Park, HI., on June 24 1942, The authorities In both place, are satisfied thnt Bird was responsi- ble for the crimes, Steele said. Seven crimes admitted to by Bird who killed most of his victims with nn ax or other bludgeon, were all snld to have been done with complices. Three killings, "too painful to occurred in Wisconsin, Now Jersey and Illinois, Bird said. Nothing specific was uncovered in .he.su cases except, that ono n Rnclne, Wls., durlnp 1012 and ,he Now Jersey slaying might have lappened us far back as 1022 or 1023. Bird did not give names or de- tails on any of the 14 murders lie said ho could "clear up." In Racine, Wis., neither the po'lcc department nor the Racine county sheriff's office listed an unsolved slaying since 1942. Flyrin 'Very Sick' With 'Virus X' Hollywood Screen Actor EjTOl FJyjin has followed hin en- tire household to bod as a victim of "Virus X" and his doctor says tho film star Is "n very sick man." Plynn was or- dered to a hos- pital Monday for treatment of the inllucnzn like malady. He rnn a temperature of 104 Monday alight. FJynn's wife, two children, but- ler and maid were stricken earlier with the illness and Monday thG cook came down with it. Merlin Rumppe, above, Blair, Wis., was the first to notice tho smoke pouring from the Taylor business building. A driver for the Federal Bakery Company of Winona, ho rushed to tho .sx'cond-story apartments and warned the residents of the dan- ger. He was in the armed serv- ices for four years and has been with the Federal bakery for years. Errol Flynn Hundred-sof Senator Taft Blasts Proposed Meat Rationing a key note of Republican opposition to Warning of Winonan Aids Two Families Grocery and Variety Store Surfer Damage Taylor, Wls. An early morning fire ot undeter- mined origin swept through a large business building here to- day, causing damage estimated at upwards of Two families, living In the second story of the builfling, narrowly escaped from the blaze when a Winona truck driver no- ticed smoke and awakened them about a. m. The families fled Into zero cold with a minimum of clothing. Eugene Hanson, owner at the building and opcrixtor of the Red A; White store, said his own loss, portly covered by insurance, would be about including the building, the grocery stock and fur- niture and clothing. Mr. and Mrs. Hanson, and their two children, ten years and four months old, and a hlRh school student, Alice Mao Vnn Gordon, lived In H gccond-slory apartment. ExllnuLted Loss to Mrs. Mne Johnson, oper- ator of the Johnson's Variety store In the brick veneer building, was estimated at about by Mr. Hanson. Merlin and Elwood WoodhulJ. operating the Woodhull Brothers egg station In the front port of the basement, escaped with the least damage. Since the fire broke out nt the rear of the 50 by 100-foot building, they were able to remove several pieces of equipment and their small stock of eggs; perhaps 30 cases. Also living In a, second-story apartment were Mr. tpd Mrs- Or- vtile Olstnd and their child, aged thres months. Furniture and cloth- ing loss to them was set at 11.500. Mr, Olstad had to borrow Bhlrt to complete his attire. Mr. Olstad and Mr. Hanson, who cars In a basement game, were able to drive them out. and- Mr. Hanson saved the cash register, containing an unspecified sum of money. All else was lost. First alarm on the flro came from Mcrtln Rumppe, driver tor the Federal Bakery Company of Wi- nona. He saw smoke coming from the rear of the building. Family Awakened He awakened the Hansons and the Taylor volunteer fire depart- ment was called. Ten minutes later. said Chief William Hclstad. the department had Its new pumper truck, purchased last May, on tho scone, and shortly 23 members of l.ho department were righting tho fire. Meanwhile, the Hansons and ON stads had escaped down the rear outside stairway, while the ate Into the grocery store stock In the floor below them. They escaped with a minimum of clothing. The flames had a big start. A half hour after the Taylor truck started pumping water from the municipal water system, the Blair (Continued on Page 16. Column 1) TAYLOR FIRE Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Partly clou- and continued cold tonight and thousands of persons in the Los Angeles area, including many film personalities, have been taken 111 with "Virus X" In recent weeks. Anderson Sees No Food Problem in Aid Plan Washington Secretary of Agriculture Anderson said today to- ial food exports proposed under the Marshall plan would actually be smaller than In other recent years. As the European recovery program progressed, he said, there would be i decreasing shipment of scarce 'oods and an increasing emphasis on the uldcd: more abundnnt foods. He to oven higher prices. The Ohioan told a reporter that while he Is not completely barring rationing or price controls, he docs not believe that meat rationing would work. "You have to sot up just as big an organization to ration one item as to ration Tare said. "Besides, meat is the one to bl.ick ral areas; high Tuesday 18 to 20. and colder to- night. Wednesday generally fair .ind continued cold, except increas- ing cloudiness with rising tempera- ture extreme west Wednesday aft- ernoon. Low tonight ranging from 15 to 25 below north to five to ten below, south portions. fair tonight operations. I am afraid that we would have a repetition of the time when cattle were killed widely on the farms instead of nt the slaught- ering houses, with the hides other by-products being lost." Although a handful of G.O.P. lawmakers led by Senator Ralph E. Flanders (Vt.) have said they bo- llcve meat rntioninp may be ncccs- Isnry by spring, Taft's views reflect Anderson gave this analysis food aspects ot the Marshall pro- gram in testimony prepared for the Senate forciRn relations committee which lias the European recovery program before it. on a limited basis. of Secretary of Agriculture Ander- son save his blessing to a fort.li- coming bill by Flnnder.s which would ten to below Interior north to zero to six below south portion. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending nt 32 m. today: Maximum, 24; minimum, 0; noon. 11; precipitation, none; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow EXTENDED FORECASTS Wisconsin and Minnesota: Tem- peratures will average near normal In extreme west and two to five be- low normal In central and cast por- tions; cold Tuesday night, rising temperatures In west and central portions Wednesday night with only moderate variations thereafter ex- authorize the Agriculture depart mcnt to make plans for moat rn tioning. FUEL OIL CRISIS WORSENS The supply of fuel oil in the city of Winona today appeared to be rapidly dwindling to a point whore the -situation appears grave. A check of more than half of the dealers revealed that nt least two nre entirely without, while sev- eral others expect that their supply will be exhausted Wednesday eveJiinfr. "The people arc going crazy looking for said one dealer, who frankly admitted that he is now selling what is known as "gray market" oil in the trade. Even so he has only a few'days' supply left. "I have n said this denier. "Either I don't get nny oil or I buy ths oil at a big price. It's quoted at 15 cents in Texas. That'll brine; it to 23 or 23 }A cents here. "That's outrageous but I have no choice." Some dealers have been rationing- their customers, while others, better supplied, have been able to meet all demands of their regular customers. Certain others, like tho two reported today have run entirely out. "That makes it lough for those of us who have a little on hand. Their customers call us up and want some. They're going crazy for oil." 1 0 cept for Rencro) j-I-slng tempera- tures toward end of period; pre- cipitation will be light, averaging from a trace to one fifth inch with principal amounts in north nnd case portions, occurring mostly as light snow, nbout Thursday and Satur- day or Sunday, TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Mln. free. Bcmidjl o Chicago 36 21 DCS Molne.1 37 11 Duluth 18 Kansas City 43 18 Angeles 82 CO Miami 71 70 tfpls.-St: Paul ____ 29 2 Orleans 71 so 1.87 York 37 34 .42 Phoenix 78 38 Washington -13 36 1.21 Edmonton 21 3 .07 Winnipeg   

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