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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: January 9, 1948 - Page 1

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Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 9, 1948, Winona, Minnesota                                Three Perish in Burning Plane Near Owatonna Owntonnft, and piwslhly three burned to dr.ilh today whpn u small piano burnt Into flume nnd criuihed In pjwtiirt J'ratl, it village five mllcK Houth of here. Itrubrn Schubert. Pratt chief of police, of the ptiinp worn HO Imclly burned It wan ImiKMnlblo to tell Immediately whrthrr there wore two or three. )lr Mild farmers In the area reported seeing the plane bunt Into flume shortly before It crn.ih.ed. Schubert suld papers bearing the name of Mr. Sweet with New York addrcsi were found In the wreckage. He ,iald several prnyorbooks also wore found In the wreckage. The officer said thi: plann apparently wax one chartered from the Northwest Aeronautical Corporation, with heariquarteni at Hol- mun field In St. Paul. Sheriff Donald M. Christiansen of Owatonna was conducting an Investigation. In Minneapolis the safety board office of the civil aeronautics board said Incomplete reports were that the plane was owned by the Northwestern Aeronautical Corporation and wax operated out of Holman field, St. Paul. Their reports Ilntcd the pilot ax Eugene Phillip and two Joe Lamont nnd Sam Sweet. They had no addresses nor other Information on the ship and Its occupants. Earl Smith, air safety Investigator for the CAB at Wold-Cham- berlaln field, Minneapolis, said ho was going to the scene of the enuh immediately. for the reneral inapectlon dlvfadoa of the Civil administration also were headed for the L. L. Schroeder, state commissioner, aald him office were that the plane wax en route to Dallas, Texaa. lie said the weather at the time of the crash apparently not Ideal but was not unflyable. First reporU Indicated, he amid, that Tlslblllty waa four miles with a. celling. W EATHER Ptrlly Cloudy, mucli cottier fon Full Leased Wire Report of The Aitociated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations IS COMING rare your new radio can VOLUME 47. NO. 274 WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING. JANUARY 9. 1948 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES Insiders' Profit Stassen Says U. S. to Bolster Turkey Submarines, Other Ships To Be Sent Greece Also to Be Reinforced Against Soviet Russia BULLETIN Highly quail- fled Informants In Whitehall xnlil tonlKht the United a.sked ami received approval from the Palestine icovcrnment to dispatch V, S. marines to the Holy Ijind as a iruard for the U. S.1 consulate there. ton Foi'.r of the navy's powerful flect-tj sub- marines are being supplied to Tur key as part of the United States prcxrrojn to strengthen that key Middle Eastern country ngalnst Soviet Russia. Tho navy made the announcement today. Representative Vlnson (D.- Ga.l later told reporters six gun- bont-i al.w will be transferred to Greece, where government forces are battling guerrillas along the borders of her northern, communist neigh- bors. Bellvcry in April Delivery of the under- sea vessels to Turkey will be com- pleted sometime in April along with the. transfer of eight motor mine sweepers, onr net laying vessel, one Kawjllnn tanker and ono repair vessel. Thl.i Is tho .latest In a series of American moves to rnlnforco Greece and Turkey ancl generally bolster the position of the Western powers In the eastern Mediterranean, target of Soviet Interests. Thn navy has about 180 sub- marines in Its operating and reserve fleets. Ru.v.la Is reputed to have an even larger undersea possibly as many as 250. The announcment came at a time that marines nro en route to strengthen crews aboard U. S. warships In the. Mediterranean. Some of r.hlp.'i nre In water about Greece where guerrilla war- fare marks tho conflict between the communism stemming from Soviet Russia and her eastern satel- lites, ancl western Europe and the United States. Joneph Henry Malib, 17, Vancouver. Wash., looks up gratefully at the Rev. Arvls Ohrnell, prison chaplain, after receiving word one- hour before he was to have hanged for murder that Governor Mon C. Wallgren had commuted his sentence to 99 years in prison. Malsh utabbcd a high school girl to death a year ago. Deputy-Warden P. A. Kelly of the state penitentiary at Walla Walla, watches. (A.P. Wire- photo to The Republican-Herald.) New Cache of Explosives For Palestine Discovered Anbury Park, N. J. A police search set off by an anony- mous tip from a farmer netted a new cache today of 57 tons of surplus army explosives which Monmouth County Prosecutor J. Victor Carton said was "tied up with" the Palestine-bound ship- ment of 30 Y2 tons of TNT seized last Saturday on the Jersey city Taft Blasts President's Proposals Bankruptcy Would Result, Ohioan Says Washington new Demo- cratic plea for Congressional unity raised a faint whisper today among the echoes of a speech by. Senator Robert C. Tart (R.-Ohlo) condemn- ng President Truman's program as he road to "national bankruptcy" and a "totalitarian state." Taft's steaming radio attack Thursday night described proposals in Mr, Truman's State of the Union message as "the ghosts of the old Vew Deal with new trappings." Taft, who is chairman of the Re- lublican Senate policy committee ,nd a candidate for his party's presi- dential nomination, said flatly: "The Republican Congress pro- poses to go on with its program." Cont Estimate. Made Meanwhile Chairman Taber (R.- N. Y.) of the House appropriations, committee estimated" the Truman program would cost and said this would make tax re- prime Q.O.P. target for impossibility. Mcmbcm Of A Senate appropriations subcommittee today heard testimony of Harold E. Stassen. ex- treme right, on speculation in commodity markets. Senators, from left to right, are Henry C Dworshak William Knowland Homer Ferguson and Theodore Green (D-R. Men In right background are unidentified, (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald 000 New Orleans Bank Robbery Staged in Daylight New Orleans Four unmasked armed men held up a midtown New Orleans bank this morning and its President A. P. Imahorn, said they escaped with in cash. The men forced their way Into the bank five minutes before opening time, slugged a Negro Janitor into unconsciousness and herded some 25 employes into locker rooms. They then forced the bank manager to unlock the vault. Joseph Tardo .said the men took from one section ol the vault, and an estl- mated from other parts of Says Pauley Holding Out Information Minnesotan Trading: Data to Senate Group Washington Harold B. Stamen testified today that administration "Insiders" have a profit of about by trading commodities since the war. Stasscn, a candidate for the Re- publican presidential nomination, also told a Senate subcommittee Inquiring Into specu- lation that Edwin W, Pauley. spc- clnl assistant to Secretary of the Army RoynJl, "did not make a full disclosure" of Ills trading activi- ties when he appeared before the committee lost month. Stassen said his information U that Pauley actually made a. profit of approximately through his trading and did not lose about II ax Stassen said Pauley im- plied. He urged the committee to "carry through" with a. complete Investi- gation, saying integrity of govern- ment Is Involved. Wearing a dark blue, double- breasted suit and speaking from notes, Stassen reiterated his tion that "insiders of the present national administration have been profiteering" through their use of official Information. Senators Ask Nonpolitical Aid Program By Jack Bell Washington Republican and a Democrat urged today that Congress put party differences aside and Join In support of a European modern vessels capable of operating at long range. The four to be trans- ferred nre the Brill. Ulurtmck. Boar- program. Senator Carl A. Hatch (N. the Democrat, carried his proposal further with an appeal for Joint fish and foot-long vessels [action on legislation to curb Infla- Scnator Alexander H. Smith, (N, Hatch's Re- publican colleague torpedo hoals nrul minesweepers hacljon t e Senate built in 104-1. They are armed ten torperlo tuber, ancl normally carry a crew of about 05. While the trnnsfrr to Turkey of waterfront. Forty tons of the explosive were discovered in a raid on a farm- house In nearby Wall township and the other 17 tons were taken in a Taft centered his fire mainly on the President's domestic proposals, Including a "cost of living" tax cut with an offsetting boost in corporation taxes, compulsory curbs on Infla- tion and a ten year plan to advance the social welfare of the nation. Nobody could fall to agree with the President's objective of im- proving the lot of the people, the Ohioan said. But as for the Presi- dent's Ideas on how this should be the safe and from .the teller cages. Bank 'officials are still checking to determine the exact amount. After scooping up all the cash and silver in sight the robbers escaped In a waiting automobile, which, one large truck-trailer found outside an done, he asserted: Asbury Park garage. A state police j "Taken together they add up to ixlnrm was broadcast for two other trucks reported headed here from thn Seneca government war mirplim depot lit Romulus, N. Y., listed by authorities as the source ol the 57 tons already taken here. national bankruptcy." "Taken together they will add up to a totalitarian Htatn." Calling Mr. Truman's tax plan "about as discriminatory a proposal ns could be Taft added: Nine men were arrested by state! "If followed to Its logical conclu- pollce and Monmouth county detec- tives ns a result of the new dis- covery of explosives in the farm- house and the big truck-trailer. The truck. Carton said, was found sion ho would ultimately exempt a large proportion of all Income and shift all taxes onto very small pro- portion of the population." Taft; noted that the President near a warehouse owned by Charles, came forth with his tax formula Lowy, of Asbury Park, who he twice vetoing G.O.P. tax re- Uso owned the farm. Lowy, bills lost year, raigned before the Justice of the "It looks to me like playing poll- brf-n contemplated Mnco the start of Turkish nicl program, there had been no previous official mcn- tlnn of submarines. foreign relations r-Tuntttcc, called for ri "nonpolltl- tM" settlement of The navy said Orercn also has tnc aclminlstnx- received six motor gun boats unde the Greek aid program Tho text of the navy's announce mrnt: "As authorized by public law 7! of the 80th Congress certain vessel; are being made available to Greece and Turkey, Gunboats Delivered "Six motor gunboats were clellvcrcc to their Greek crews at Norfolk Va.. during November. "The transfer of the following ves- sels to the Turkish navy will be completed somo time In April: "One giisollne tanker, one repair vessel, eight motor mine sweepers one net laying vessel, and four sub- marines. "All vo.vel'i except (.he submarines will he. flellvm-fl lr> Turkish errws at the United Stales yards prepar- ing them. "The submarines, all of the fleet type, will be delivered by United States crews to a Turkish port." It Couldn't Happen Except in Hollywooc Hollywood (rt'i Alfred Schrler, 21, was hurrying to catch a bus when he was struck by an automobile. He knocked to tho puve- mrnt and a crowd quickly gath- ered, lie to get up but several 'pairs of hands re- strained him. "Don't ehorusrcl several voices, "You m.'i.v have n broken back or Helpful onlookers Mi-athetl him Iji jc blanket. Sirens .screamed. I'ollee ar- rived. The erowd got bigger. Finally im umliiiliinrc rushed him to Hollywood reeelvlmr hos- pital. There he was thoroughly ex- amined. The diagnosis: A sprained thumb. tlon-G.O.P. argu- ment over, who shall operate the Marshall plan for European recov- ery. With Secretary of State Marshall standing firm on the contention that he must con troi vital policy told a reporter he thinks Dromlse is Imperative with House Republicans who want a separate lovcmment corporation, set up to administer the foreign nld program. "But it must be without politics jcace, Prrd Qulnn of Freehold, ilcadnd Innocent to a charge o (storing explosives without a perm! and was held In bail pend- ing grand jury action. Pennsylvania state police in Doylestown, said they were convinced a Bucks county farm used an a summer camp for group celebrations, was the place where truckers picked up cases labeled "machinery" which were part of the pounds of explosives marked for Palestine found in Jersey City Saturday. The Jersey City shipment was seized while it was being loaded on a freighter ot-the American Export linen bound for Palestine. Inventor Sues Ford, Others For 251 Million tics with your the law> maker sold. "In this picture the federal gov- ernment comes forward again as Santa CJuua himself, with a rich present for every special group In tho United States. If anyone has expressed a desire In a letter to Santn OIniis, that desire IM to be promptly fulfilled." Toft added: Sees Wallace Influence cannot but feel that the re- witness said, bore a license plate j which resembled those on ntatc-j owned cars. Police said the janitor was pistol- whipped by one of the when he protested their "roughing up' one of the bank's women employes. The bank was the mid-city branch of the Hibernla National bank. It is on the corner of Carrollton and Canal streets, one of the town's busiest Intersections. Pair Hold Up> Store in Cambridge Cambridge, MUKN. Two gunmen today held up a big depart- ment store run by the Harvard Cooperative society and escaped with from to Ing smoke bombs to cover their get- away. Working with split-second timing, the gunmen grabbed the cash Just as it was delivered from a' bank by special policemen in an armored Panic broke out In (.he big stor in busy Harvard ou side the entr.ir.ee to Harvard yar cries of "fire" startled abou 200 customers as the fleeing gun men threw their smoke bombs. A third man waited at the whee of the getaway car.   In addition to Pauley, ht named Brigadier OKsneral Wallace H. Gra- ham and Ralph Davicc. Cotldw these, Stassen said, "there are a number of others high In the ad- ministration that arc Involved." The three he mentioned already have been on Agriculture department lists as having traded In grain or other Gra- ham js President Truman's personal physician nnd Davlcs was In administration during the war. Graham was Invited by the corn- mi tee to follow Stassen on stand. Stassen -said he has Information that administration figures traded in commodities to the extent of about and that "they have profiteered personally to tlw extent of Stassen and committee Chairman Ferguson noted that A speech by Stassen in Doylestown, Pa., last December 10. in which ftrst made the charges about ad- ministration figures, led to the prea- ent Inquiry, The witness said he was glad to respond to the committee's invitation to appear "as I always will be." After Stassen said other admin- istration people besides Pauley, vips and Graham were Involved in commodity speculation, Ferguson asked if he had any other to give the committee. Stassen said: "t think it would be preferable that (hey be devel- oped from the exact evidence. I would prefer to give you the leads and indications, on which you will develop the exact evidence." Stnsscn testified Pauley bought shares of wheat futures lait August 12 when Pauley in Hon- olulu and Robert Hannegan. then postmaster general and Democratic national chairman, was his gueit there, Anderson b Guest He added that Pauley sold shares August 19 at a profit of S4.700 at a time when Secretary of Agriculture Anderson was guest in Honolulu, PauJey acknowledged before committee December 12 that he in Hawaii at tile same time as An- cnact a European recovery program in the manner he proposes. Marshall volunteered at a. news conference this Information on his attitude. He had declined earlier in re- sponse to a question to add or sub- tract from his statement Thursday hat Congress should meet all the cquircmcnts of European J-ecovcry plan or else not undertake the job at all. On other subjects Marshall told ils pews conference: Next June 30 Is simply a targci ate for the state department to ake over from the army adminls- ratlon of Germany. Earlier Deccm- cr 31, :947, was the target date ut that proved impractical, Ho hnd hoped that the navy's isslgnmcnt of marines to its leditcrrancon force could be done ulctly but as it turned out it could but denied he talked with Ander- son about grain, Pauley also said there was no way Anderson or President Trumnn could have "con- ceivably" known of his market ac- tivities. Pauley said he talked with An- derson and Hanncgan about talclnc the army post as Royall's aide, prof- fered him by Royall, and was told to use his own judgment. He tes- tified he held "something less than a million dollars modities when he worth of com- .took tile army ot be done that way. The pur- ose of the assignment, he said, ms to raise ships complements up o full strength. The total of as not very large, he said, in terms f the foreign policy interests of he United States In the Mcditcr- ancan. He Bald he had no com- cnt on ,lhe navy's announcement f a transfer of four submarines to Turkey. position last September 3, but that he had liquidated "approximately 90 per cent of reducing holdings of grain from bush- els to approximately Stassen asked the committee to Inquire into the manner in which Paulcy's orders from Honolulu placed, He also urged that the have expert accountants check the pattern in which Pauley moved in and out of commodity markets, comparing it with the timing of the dealings of Ralph Davies "and others in the government." There were, meanwhile, other developments and In ever- widening inquiry into the of speculation in commodities: 1. Tho Department of Agricul- ture made public a list of major (Continued on Page S, Column 1) STASSEN   

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