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Winona Republican Herald: Monday, December 22, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 22, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER ml FM IS COMING Be mre your new rmdlo can receive it. Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 260 WINONA, MINNESOTA. MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 22, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES ress to Have Own 'Marshall Senator Taft Plans Speech In Minnesota Agreement Made With Stn.sen for 'Invasion' Washington Sonntor Tnl of Ohio In going west ngntn In hi race for thr Republican pre.nUlpntln nomlnftUon, this tlmo on n toil which will tnko him Into Hnrold 3 Stajwn's home stnlo of Minnesota Taft's visit to Minneapolis for Lincoln Dny uddrww February 13 I In the nnturo of returning n on Blawen matte to Ohio In Oclobo JJecnuse pnoh wns consulted in ncl vance and approved tho other's In vwlon of his homo grounds, talk o a tacit undprstnndlng between th two hM grown, Iioth Oppose Iiewey Both nro announced. oandlrtnto for the nomination. Both aro In urestpd In seeing thnl Oovomo Thomns X. Dewpy ot Now Yor rtorsn't repent nt the Juno oonvcn tlon in Philadelphia his succossfu bid for the 1044 nomlnntlon. Kuch would like to Inherit th other's strength If ono fnlls by th wayside in the enrly convention voting, Taft evidently ptnns only to show himself to the people of Minnesota In the hope thut they will romom ber him If Stnsspn Is from tho competition. But the Ohio sonntor has m nuceulent pollllcnl fish to fry In i otiwr speaking dntes. and posslbl, two more, on the February trip It Is of the. fow on which h will embark whllo Congress Is In Arrangements have boon mnde fo him to spenk In Omahn February 13 and At Drover February 14, While Taft. has said ho expect to enter nny primaries out- side of Ohio, he conceivably coult pushed Into the February. 18 Nebraska convention by hM frlondi Wlaraniln Wntohei Nebraska has 16 votes In thi Philadelphia convention. Its prl' mary just a wonk after whn U expected to be a critical o Jlfpubllenn asplrnnts In Wisconsin And whnt hnpptms there mlgh' have a ollnohlng effect, on thi outcome. Taft being counted M a sort contender for Colorado's 11 convention VOIDS slnco his trip t( the Pacific Cor.st In September an  the body nf Jrnn Wrrklrr. Workmen started rt'rnovlng n sco- tlon of the brlclgo floor ulUt in J-bfnm of the brklgo so thnt n rlnm bucket could be dropped to the bottom for tho scooping opera- tion. H wait hoped to begin dig- King by mid-nftrritoori. f.hrrlfl K. Mnrnhnll snicl Buririny the search wn.i "tn'Klnnlng IfKiit rulher OwirK" Iifhtiiniiii. a dlviir, nnlc thut JutlKliiK by wny Ihn dt I ho bottom of the rlvrr wore Khifting, the body mny bo under thrcr to frnt of snncl, Ituvro f'.rhmldt, another diver, uvd Htindny In probing tho drpthi for the child's body which Convicted Murderer Ilufovel 12, suit! IIP threw thpro, Woman Sentenced for Killing .Minn. (it'i tJIskrlol Jutlce Awl Anderson, Owntonnn, today sriitcncfd Mrs. Sylvln Hporrn, 41-yrnr-old divorcee, to servo from five to la ycurs In tho tilmkopon Women's reformntory us n result of hi-r conviction on first dogrt'o man- fcfnuuhtrr charges In the slitylng of 71-yrar-old John Dwyer, her em ployer. Author Mark Hellinger Dies Report Plane A f, L _- J _ After Finishing 'Naked City Hollywood Mark Holllngo 44, ono of Broadway's most prollfl chroniclers, Is (load, Tho former nowspnpor reporte who turned out hundreds of shor stories nbout New York llfo, an then turned to the movies, died Sun dny of n heart atlack. Only a fow days ago, Helllnge comploled his final production "Tho Naked which he tol friends Is "my celluloid monumen to Now Whllo gnlnlng stature as a write nnd producer of motion pictures 1: tho Insl dccado, ho continued t writo a weekly story and column fo King Fenturcs Syndicate. Ho als sorvod briefly as a war correspond ont for International News servlc In tho South Pacific and India dur Ing World War II, Ho died at cedars of Lebanon hospital a few hours aftor beln solsiod with severe chills at his horn high In tho Hollywood hills. Ills wife, the former Gladys Glad ox-Zlogfold Follies beauty, was a his sldo when death onme. Thej hnd two adopted children, Mark six. and Gladys, five. Funeral services -will be held a 11 n. m. Wednesday.____ British Launch Drive to Curb Communist Moves London Brltnln's ruling nbor party launched todny-a onm pntgn against communist "Inflltrn ;ion and Intrigue" within the or ganlwitlon. and the communists Im mediately branded tho drive a U. S, Inspired plot to link Britain with Franco and Italy In itn attempt to split the trada unions. Warning that the were out to "sabotage" the govern mont. Labor Party Secretary Mor gan Phillips dispatched a letter to all labor tho trndi which he urged tha they take thi offensive against com- munist Influence within the party The Communist Dully Worker a retallatid by attack follows tiwhtni uf preparatory work by the TJ.. f. State department, noting partly -through ts ombnsslos and partly thrown mid ngents of American 'ntlon of Labor, "Their aim Is to split unions of France, Italy and Britain. Phil- ips' letter obediently parallels the tnotlos used by the reaotlonnrlM in Frnnoc." This obvlounly was a reference to last Frldny in Paris whore the nntl-communlst minority wing of the Communist Genera Confodfimtlen of Labor voted to sooodo nnd form its own rude group. In his letter said that he British Communist party had olned the "cold war' gnlnst western brand of soclal- nnd ngnlnst the Marshall aid plnn for European recovery. "We cnn expect communlst-ln- iplred to foment dlscon- ,ent In fnotorles and workshops which muy result In slowing down hampering he the production According to best estimates, bnsod in recent election returns, there iro only nbout communists In irltnln, but thny hold a number of toy Undo union tuiong groups so vltnl to iirltnln's erovory progrnm ns Iho minors nglnoors nnd irnnsport workors. Kvon ns Phillips letter wns bolng llstrlbutod the Moscow radio iiurioherl n now hlnst ngnlnnt tho vtnrshnll plnn. doolnrlng Its "o enoo" wns Burnquiit Ruling on School Attendance St. I'aul School children vho reside more than two miles rom n schoolhouse In their own llsirlot hnvo n right to nttond lit nnothor district If It Is iimi'nr, Altorntiy Gonornl J. A, A, niriuuilut rulud todny. Thn opinion wns roquostod by L. Swnnson of Hbow Lnko, Grant lounty nttornoy. frank W. Kracmer, above, Fodornl Internal Rovonuo col- lector for Connecticut, In- dlotod by Federal Grand Jury on charges of having Illegally solicited and collected About from aa Internal revenue employed "for tho purpo.no of furthering tho Interest of Dem- oorntlo pnrty" In 1MO gunornl nlPoMon. (A.P. Wll'ophoto to Tho Uupubllaan-llurnld.) Mark Hellinger Here's Winning Definition of a Communist Columnist Walter winchell announced Sunday over KWNO the American Broadcasting Company the award of a 000 mink ooat to David Block of El Monle, Calif., for his def- inition of a communlxt. Block's definition was judged the bvdt In a contest conducted by Wlnohell to raise funds for the Damon Runyon Memorial Cancer fund. The fund receiv- ed more than through the content, the columnist said. In hid weekly broadcast ladt nlghl, Wlnohell dald the win- ning definition was: "A COM- MUNIST 18 ONE WHO WOULD LIKE TO DIVIDE EVERYTHING rAIlTICU- LAHLY THESE UNITED Report Scarcity of War Scientists Government of, floinls dald today there id a critical scarcity of scientists In certain jranchos of military research. Bui hey discounted statements that an aversion to working on death-deal- ing weapons Is -the primary cause. Economic factors nnd a scholar's for complete freedom In than ceopn mnny of away from government work, of tho Military -and tho Atomic Energy commission told it reporter, Tho latest of ft series of otato- monts cnmo recently from Dr. Thoo- dor Rosebury, Columbia university professor, who said "many Amorl7 cnn scientists nro refusing to work on military Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS For Wlnonn and vicinity: Incrcas- ng cloudiness tonight with somo snow Into tonight nnd continuing Tuesday forenoon. Low tonight 15, Coldor Tuesday, highest In tho aft- ernoon 20, Minnesota: Partly cloudy tonight ind Tuesday. Colder tonight nnd colder today and much colder to- night wllh tomporrilurcs falling to Ivo to ton bolow zero extreme north lo five above south. Wlnconsln: Considerable cloudl- osrt tonight nnd Ttuwday, with oa- aaiilonul light snow north and iinaw tnd 1'nln and local otlth tonight. Coolur north tonight nd on tiro Ntato Tuesday. LOCAL WEATHER OfT.clal observations for tho 24 hours ending nt noon Sundny: Maximum, 30; minimum, 10; noon, 0; precipitation, none. OWlclnl observations for tho 24 lours uiidlng lit noon today: Maximum, 34; minimum, V; noon, II; precipitation, none; nun IIOLH to light nt sun rlnos tomorrow t TEMl'ERATVRES ELSEWHERE Max. Mln, Proc, Domldjl Duluth .OH Angolos Vllainl 30 33 (12 37 48 44 14 13 21 G4 17 39 31 20 n ,00 .31 Pan lonttlo ?hocnlx kVnshlnglon rhn Pus DAILY HIVGH liUI.LKTIN rloocl Stage 24-Hr. Stage Today Change Dnm a, T.W...... 2.1 Rod Wins......H 2.4 niko City........ 8.B Diim 4, TW...... 4.2 Dam 6, 2.B Dnm 6, T.W...... .VJrionn (C.P.) 13 Dnm C, Pool...... D.B Dnm (I, T.W....... 4.4 Dnkotn (C.P.) Dnm 7, Pool..... Dnm 7, Ln Crown .....12 4.7 Tributary Streams Chlppown nt.Durand 3.B .2 Zumbro fit Thollman 2.0 ,1 Buffalo nbovo Alma 3.0 -I- .1 Tromponlcnu nt Dodge 1.0 Blnok nt Onlosvlllo 3.3 Ln Crosso nt W. Salem 2.2 .5 Hoot at Houston 0.1 RIVER FORECAST (From Hastings to Cuttenberg, Jown) No gnto oporntlon Is indicated un- OSH oxtromoly mild wenthor seta In, no nonrly wLnlloniiry uliiKOH will pro- all Lht.s wouk. Flies Faster Than Sound Aviation Magazine Declares U. S. XS-1 Pierced Barrier Wiuililnjtton An American plane Is reported to have flown faster than sound. The magazine Aviation Week says In its Issue dated today that, the Bell XS-1, nn experimental rockei craft, has pierced the ao-callec sonic barrier on several occasions during tho past month at Muroc air base, Calif, Marvin Miles, aviation writer for tho Los Angeles Times, also wrote today that ho had "learned from re- liable sources" that the Ions- sought speed had been attained, Colonel Silent Colonel S, A. dllklo, commandant of thd Muroc base, neither confirm- ed nor dented tho reports. Secretary of Defense Forrcstal has Issued an order forbidding of- ficial disclosure of progress In high speed flight. The speed of sound generally Is stated at 760 miles an hour. This is based on a temperature of 59 de- flight. CnpUIn Yacgeiv Above, IN i-upoi'f.od to hiwc ilown an experimental rocket plane, tho Boll XSi; foster than sound according to n atory.ln today's issue.of-the: magazine Aviation Week. to.Tho green Fahrenheit at sea level. It varied up to, an hour In either dlrnatlon the tumpurnturo Isos or fulls, Story, Robert H. Wood, editor of Avia- tion Week, sold he had withheld publication of the story for several weeks at the request of nlr force of- ficials. He told a reporter the un- dcrotnndlnB was that tho air force also would withhold publication. Wood said ho decided to release tho story after learning tho air 'orco was preparing n news release on tho XS-1'H record. An air force npoko.imixn suid no such release Is n preparation. The Bell X8-1 is powered by four rockets, It IK launched from the belly of a four-engine B-29 bomber, When tho XS-1 was flrwt nnnounc- id, tho air foron It wa.i uxpuctud ovuntuully to roach a npoud of miles an hour. Communists Capture Ex-Windom Pastor VVIniliini, Minn. Ruy- :nond Shootw of Wlndom hus ru- colvod word from her brother, the lov. D, L. Carr, tliat the Rev. Rou- )Cii Oustafson, formerly Wlndom and now a missionary In China, las boon captured by communists n North China and' is being hold [or ransom. Michael Sarklsian, 28, of Lawrence, Mass., holds his daughter Tcrrence, three, as his wife, Helen, 25, they returned her after a gunman kidnapped the family and Patrolman William J IStewart, left and took the four on a wild 40-mile ride at gunpoint last The wife..child and.policeman wore released In West Doylston. Mass., and tho father was released in Worcester. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Fact-Find Board To Study Western Union Grievances Washington A pre-Chrlst- mns strike of Western Union work- ers was averted todny by shifting major differences between the com- 3any 'and three A.F.L. unions to a 'act-finding board for decision in >0 days. The action delays the threat of nation-wide telegraph tie-up at cast until after February the time telephone workers plan ;o begin wage talks with the Bell Telephone companies across the country. The two groups of communica- tions workers were poised to Htrlko simultaneously last spring, but the telegraph workers settled for a five- cent hourly pay 'increase on the ovo of the scheduled tie-up. The toluphono Htrlkiii flvo' woukit, Tho runowtid WoHtnrn Union dis- pute arose over union demands for i 15 cent an hour wngo boost. The walkout first was set to begin at 5 a, m., tomorrow, but the unions ater threatened to call the tele- graphers out on shorter notice. However, day-long conferences with Federal Conciliation- Director Cyrus C, Ching finally resulted In nn agreement liHo last night, to iimcol thu iilrlka call. A thrco-mnn fact-finding panel ,o be chosen by .Chlng will decide ,wo main Issues which the concilia- tion chief said had "impeded" set- Icmcnt. They arc: 1. Whether the contract, which wns signed last April 1' could be opened .for a new wage demand October date the union pick- November 1, 2, What Is meant in tho current contract by a provision cullliiK for i study of- tho "wage-profit" rcla- ,ionshlp in connection with any new pay demand. Cancellation of the threatened trlko by A.F.L, telegraph unions iiHt: night will liiNuro full Wostoni Union service here, it was ilnnounc- d today by L. T. Fischer, manager jf the winona Western Union office. Station to Air Point, Wls. Radio SUvllon WLDL buck on ho air at full operating .strength :oday for the first time since last 'ebruary, when its transmitter ower collapsed nt Aubunjdnle. A new 450-foot tower was com- pleted over the weekend and the tatlon resumed operations Monday morning. Be a Good Fellow The following is a list of con- tributions to the Good Fellows fund to date: Previously lilted ......J2.215.M Woman's ClirUtlun Temperance TJnlon Peter and David Machinists Lodge 133 Republican -Herald carrier boys A friend Winona Activity Group Choate Cboatc Company employes 28.50 ricnnU and Daryl Erion 2.00 Caledonia reader Sharon Lee and Blake Turner A friend............... A friend .Tunic A frlcnrt Mcrlll Cnsn Shirley, Robert and Fayc Stclphlur Mr. imil S. Tnimcnn Thn J. II. Wiitklns Coniimny -SOO.O8 A A Mr. and' W. K. fruit and' vegetables A friend 'from Sunan Steber cockled and clolhen A Frank Krauwi and liimholH of nppIi-N In llio lint In Saturday's pa- per, Edward nnd C. Jasmer should have read Edward C. Jasmer. 7.28 2.00 10.00 7.80 1.00 10.00 50.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 S.OO 1 S.OO 2.00 Toledo Dancer 15-Year Prison Term Havana. Patrlclb, (Satlra) Schmidt was sentenced today to 15 years In prison and payment of a Indemnity for the yacht slaying of her lover, John Lester Mee of Chicago. The three Judges of the Audlcncla court reached thdr decision In n weekend of study, after closing of the trial Friday. A public prosecutor had demand- ed a 26-year term, for manslaughter nnd n, prlvnlo prosecutor hired bj Mcis's father, Dr. Lester K. Mco o Wilmette, had sought a 30- year sentence for murder. The defense had contended that the 22-year-old Toledo, Ohio, danc- er hnd shot Mee in. terror and by accident last April and that rough handling, rather than the bullet wound the fatality. :I CHILDREN AND PET Jerry (lie ox. bourht during the meal shortage by Harry Malenke, farmer ncnr as potcnllul slcak. now Is a pel at the children. Charles. 3, (al bridle) and (left to right) Kenny, 9. Francis, 11. Ccnc, 5. BUlic. 12. and Willie. 13.. Violent Deaths In Arab-Jewish War Reach 300 By Joseph C. Goodwin disorders nddcd ten more persons today to tho toll of fatalities exacted by Jewish-Arab warfare in Palestine boosting to 300 the unofficial coun of violent deaths since the United Nations voted on November' 29 to partition the Holy Land. The new bloodshed brought from Hagana, self-styled Jewish defense force, an appeal to Arab leaders help restore' order in Palestine and end the reign of death nnd terror. One of those slnfn yesterday was n 35-year-old British Jew, Bober Stem, nn employe of the Palestine government's public Information bureau, who was shot to death In Jerusalem 100 yards from his of- Jlcc. A former newspaperman, he OIXOB worked for tho Mnnchcslcr Guardian nnd as an assistant cor- respondent for -the Chicago Tribune In London. The wounded Included a British lieutenant and a sergeant major who were shot down in the center of Jerusalem by four unidentified youths. A British army wireless operator also was wounded whet an Arab band attacked two armored cars with machine guns near Tul- kurm, The sharpest clash between Jews and Arabs yesterday was reported In to town of Safod in Upper Gall- Ice, where one Arab was killed anc three Arabs and two Jews wounded in the third straight day of fighting Tho town. which has a mlxec population of Arabs and Jews, was placed under n curfew until fur- ther notice. Two Jews were stubbed to dcnth near tho village of Ynzur when the oil truck in which they were riding was stopped and set afire by a num- ber of men officially described ns Arabs. An Arab later was slain near Ya- ir in a gunfight between Arab bnndu nnd a Jewish truck convoy Three Arabs nnd five Jewish KCttlc- mcnt policemen were wounded. Northwest of Jerusalem tlirce oc- cupants of an Arab bus were slain when 15 or 20 men wearing, tho uni- forms of Pnlpjitlno polico force non- nuiblo.i riddled tho mnchlno with gunfire. One Arab wns killed in Haifa and another was slain in shooting along the Jaffa-Tel Aviv borderland The weekend bloodshed brought to 420 the unofficial tabulation of fatalities throughout the Middle East since the U. N. decision to partition Palestine touched on tho communal strife. Girl Reports Being Held in Captivity Madison, Done and Jefferson county authorities were searching today for the men a 17- ycnr-old Dane county farm girl said held her captive in n, car for an hour after striking her on the head Saturday night. The girl told Deputy District At- torney William J. Coyne of Madison that she was dragged into the car nt Cambridge, near her home after she declined to accept a ride. She said she was struck a blow on the head before being placed in the car and lost consciousness. There were at least two men In the car, she said. The girl remembered nothing, she said, until she was let out of the car near Lake Blplcy about a mile from her home. Governor Citizens to Back Safety Campaign St. Paul Governor Young- dahl today called upon citizens to join forces with the National Safety council and 130 other cooperating organizations which are conducting a nation-wide campaign to prevent accidents during the Christmas holi- day season. "The effort to reduce the number of accidents which mar Christmas lapplncss in so many of our homes can be successful only if every one of our citizens docs his pnrt to nake this Christmas u safe holiday the governor said. Herter Bill Gets Support, Martin Says Cut of 17 Billion Dollar Truman Proposal Expected By Douflu n. Cornell Washington going to draft Its own "Marshall plan" lor European recovery. And all signs today point to a program nowhere near as big as the admin- istration's four-year project. Speaker Martin 
                            

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