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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: December 17, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 17, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER nnllf (iloilrty nn4 IS COMING He irum your nnr radio can M. Full Leased Wire Newt Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO. 256 WJNONA. MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER I 7. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES Cold Puts New Load on Good Fellows OLD w I n t wenlhor chill chrouft poorly c In It I tho 1 1 in o to wnrm clothing I youngster Is t rnjoy tho out door o Mlnnofiotn. Vitcntlon day urn nlmoiit horn Thp nitefly ohll (Iron of thifl com munlty like t piny with thl. f the points wore covered previous y In the President's program, Tnft has Mid thut unless the bll cun bo pnsMd there today, there s little livelihood thnt the HOUM which declined to consider M nome< whnt nlmllur mensuro, could no ipon It before the Mhoduled Frl tuy nlKht adjournment of tho lol Msslon of Duluth 10 Mplv St. J'uul 24 II o Ilf) HO IP Nrw York Ti7 Phorrilx 61 Tin- F'II.I 6 Winnipeg 7 DAILY KIVKK iituKo Tocliw ChnnKR Later city 5.8 Dnni 4. TAV -rO.l Dam T.W Dimi f.A, N -l-O.l Wlnoim I C.P.i 13 Dnm B. T.W Oiikotii iC.P.) Dnm 7, T.W 2.3 Iji Crcu.v i: 8.0 Chlppfwn tit Duraiul ZUfnbro nt Thcllinun 2.4 Iluffulci iitxivp Alrnu 3.0 ut DfXluo 1.7 Black nt Oulcsvllli' ____ 3.3 IA Crow nt. W. Hivlcm Houston 8.0 lltVKIt FOUKCAST (Xrom to Cuttenberg, I OWN I DiirlriK tlir rrmiilmlcr of wrrtc. there will bp vory llltlo rhiuicr in thr rlvrr through- out this district. Andresen Asks Barnes of Alien Speculators August H. Andresen (R.-Mlnn.) aid today ht to obtain nnd make public" the names of illens who "are heavily engaged' in poculntlon" In the commodity ex Anclroson, chairman of n Hpeclal loutio food Investigation committee incl sluice) to head a special seven- mnn House committee to Investigate poouliitlon on tho commodity mar- iota, told M reporter: "Many wealthy refugees who have oon In this country during and unco tho war as guests of this our bounty nnd Indulged In npecu- itlvo operations on tho commodity xchnnKos, "Under existing thono rof- clnsood an nonresident and not required to pay in- omo taxes on spoculntlvo profits, Those havo mntcrl- lly ncldod to tho upward pressure n the cost of living." Anclroson said n federal agency hiul mndo n check at request for the food committee nnd Its re- port lists ON niton from tho of 18 futures commls- merchants chocked. tho Incomplete over tho four Tho report no Identify nro not required to themselves, Tho 06 showed purchases of of whont nnd KnloH of of bUHholn of corn nnd of nncl purchased of 20 cnr- of nnd xnlcs of 100. "1 Intend to nppcnr before the Houso nnd committee to dnmnnd n ohungo In tho Inw HO those persons nnd who may bo exempt from Income will bo rod u I rod to pny tho tax ns thin Invlod nKnlnst an Amoricnn Hald. nro not engaged In n trndo or buMnonx and nro simply taking itdvnntnKO. of a loop- holn In tho Incomo tnx law to spec- ulnto nnd not pny taxes." Veterans Welfare Fund Gets Endorsement of Civic Groups; Plans House for Carl Lauer Mr. And Carl Lauer who were married In Galesburg, HI., September 27, aro shown above. Tho Injured veteran will be per- munently confined to a wheel chair since he Is paralyzed from the waist down. Pinna for ft memorial home for the Lauers were launched at a civic meeting last night. Door Left Open to Russia As 3-Power Plans Shape By John M. London A highly placed goveriri'ment iource said today the.DrltUh.cabinet probably will '.'rcoonslder-the-whole.structure of'lU foreign policy" tomorrow as a result of the Big Four foreign ------foreign policy minister's failure to reach any agreement on the future of Germany. Foreign Secretary Ernest Bcvln was ,to open the cablnel dollberntions with formal reporl on tho disagreements which brought the Big Four conference to a close In failure. It appeared certain that Britain would Join with the United States In a strong bid to have France merge her occupation zone of Germany with the already fused British-Am- erican zones so as to put as much Area Badger County March of Dimes Chairman Named Milwaukee. Western Vlsconsln county directors for the 048 Mnrch of January fund- alslng drlvn of tho National Poun- atlon for Infantile Paralysis, were nnouncod today by Byron B. Con- Wisconsin Rapids, state foun- atlon chairman. Heading tho drive In Buffalo ounty will be Lester Rosonow; non county, Edward Hclneck; opln county, Claude Langlols, and "rcmpoaloau county, Kussell N Mllcr. 2 Critically Hurt n St. Paul Truck, Streetcar Crash St. Paul Two postoffice mploycs, Injured In tho collision f tholr truck wtlh n streetcar, rc- lalnod In serious condition at nckor hospital today, with 12 of B pnssongoi'H In tho streetcar ro- ulrlng ho.ipltixllzatlon also. Joseph ancliont. 30, driver of the ruck, nnd his helper, Slgfrled O. och. 22, suffered hond Injuries hon tho truck and streetcar col- dcd hond-on and then burst into amos yesterday. The fire started hen tho fuel tank of the truck as ruptured. Trolly kicked out wln- ows to escape nnd the Incoming r fanned, tho flames. Tho Interior tho streetcar was destroyed. Tho accident occurred on the olby nvonuo overpass nt Pascnl root. Chrlatmns packages nnd mall In 10 truck, a military-typo vehicle, oro clostroyod or badly damaged tho flro nnd water. Minnesota Farm Income at Record 8t. I'aul Minnesota, nro currently ringing cnsh roglntoi'd with nn nil-time record Income of for 1047, or nearly four times- tho nvorngo of prewar yonrn, Wnrron C, Walto, university farm economist, estimated to- dny, Wulto itnld thnt, after deduct- ing tho total Income would bo nn nvcr- nico of for each fnrm op- erator, with that amount In- cluding pity for own nnd his labor nn woll tho ro- lurn on investment. led thn murkot pnrndo to bring in with dai- ry products second nt 000, And Hales of cattle and cnlvos yielding for third position. Although aver- age production below 'that of 1040, Income was up about 25 per cent duo to higher prices for fnrm commodities, Waito On tho expense side of tho lodger, the report snld tho larg- est Item was for food, stock nnd equipment; took nnd farm rentals There were nlso paid for hired help (ind In interest charges IhemnolvoH consumed worth of tholr own procluctH, and tho value of rent- nls for the homes In which they lived was not at Initial Project to Be Launched Immediately Organization of a Veterans Wei- faro Fund for the purpose of aid- Ing Wlnona veterans who have been helplessly dlsnbled, received the unanimous endorsement of repre- sentatives of nine civic organiza- tions at a meeting at the Knights of Columbus clubhouse last night. First project of the group and one which will be launched Immediately will be to build and completely furnish a home for Carl W. Lauer who was wounded In Franco August D, 1044, linn been continuously hos- pitalized since and who IN from the waist down. Sergeant Lauer Is believed to be tho most disabled war veteran In Wlnona and It Is the plan of the group to present him with tho homo an a lasting and living memorial ot community recognition from the citizens of Wlnona nnd vicinity. An option already has been ob- tained on a lot In Goodvlew village across highway 01 from Building Materials Incorporated and Leo W Buchholz, owner of the building firm, hao promlnud to give Carl any tlnd of nn offlco Job which ho could handle while confined to his wheel chair. The home will be construct- ed with ramps Instead of steps so that tho Injured veteran, can get to all pnrtn of It in hln chair, Sergeant Lnuur Is still conllned to Vaughan hospital, Hines, 111., but expects to be released In the spring. On September 27 he married Miss Jean Marilyn Anderson at Gales- burg, 111. Brother Killed Mart hall to Report Wnnhlnirton Secretary of State Mariball will report to the nation by radio at 0 p. m. (C.S.T.) Friday on the breakup of the European peace confer- ence In London. The State department, in an- nouncing the time of the broad- cast, today Marshall will Npeak about 20 minutes. Marshall In expected to arrive about 8 a. m. (E.8.T.) Friday from London aboard President plane, the "Sacred Cow." as possible of Germany's Industrial machine to work In Europe's re- construction. Marshall Lunches With King Inltlnl discussions along this line wore believed to have taken place today when French Foreign Mln ister Georges Blduult called on Be- vln. U. S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall and Bldault re- portedly discussed this same sub- ject lant night. Marshall lunched with King George at Buckingham palace to- day. The deputy foreign ministers, meanwhile, reopened their confer- ences on tho Austrian question to- day. British.and American sources said they expected to know In a few dnys whether any chance exists on agreement.. French sources said it also was understood that Bldault and Mar- shall discussed a tentative sugges- tion for a Washington meeting of American, British nnd French for- eign, ministers January 15. Door Left Open As diplomatic thinking became adjusted to tho fact of n breakdown In the London "Big Four" talks vlonday, there 'was Increasing em- phasis on ,the view that while the Western powers Intend to fit west- ern Germany Into European recov- ery under the Marshall plan the door will not be shut on future co- operation 'with Russia. The British foreign office distri- buted a statement last night ex- panding Bevln's remarks at the final meeting of tho "Big Four" Monday. In It; while discussing tho repara- issue, on which tho conference finally foundered, Bevln said the ,otal nmount of reparations taken out of Germany by the Russians, at a rough estimate, was "consid- erably more than "We have, of course, no moans of chocking tho statement quot- ed Bcvln as saying. "But until the acts are given us, we cannot dis- cuss this question in a serious man- ner." One of Carl's brothers, Bernard J, Lauer, was killed In an airplane crash off the coast of Washington In October. 1943, while leaving the United States with a group of serv- icemen for foroiim Horvlce. Carl In n won of William J. Lnuor, 451 West Wabuslm Street. Organizations represented at last night's meeting were tho Elks lodge, of Eagles, Improved Order of Redme'n, Veterans of For- eign Wars, Knights of .Columbus, American.'Legion, Junior Chamber of Commerce, Association of Com- merce, Wlnona Civic association and Goodvlew village. Other orga- nizations such ns the Masonic bod- ies, Lions, Rotary, Klwnnis and Op- timist clubs, tho Wlnona Athletic club and Wlnona Activity Group will bo asked to send representatives to future meetings. Tho fund, which is an organized Honor Gray at Banquet Anderson to Be Subpoened For Price Data Information Sought on Grain, Other U. S. Markets Repub- lican leaders decided today that Secretory of Agriculture Anderson should be ordered to appear before a Senate committee with all Infor- mation he has on grain and other commodity trading. The announcement was made by Senator Taft (R.-Ohlo) chairman of the Republican policy committee after a hastily called meeting of the committee. Taft told rcportera that the meet- ing was called at the request of the appropriations committee to con- sider Anderson's refusal to make public any information unless au- to do so by Joint congrcs- Hlonal resolution. Sufffeiiti Itaiolullon In a letter to Chairman Bridges (R.-N.H.) of the appropriations com- mittee, Anderson suggested yester- day that Congress adopt a Joint resolution "and thereby legalize the action which I shall then be glad to takn." Tuft "Tho Kocrctary la abso- lutely wrong midcr the in re- fusing to furnish the committee the information without a resolution. The appropriations committee Js trying to run down rumors that gov- crnmunt officials used In.sldu Infor- mation to profit In commodity trad- ing. The Agriculture deportment has limited regulatory authority over commodity exchanges and under this authority is able to collect infor- mation on trading, including names of traders. Alexandra 6. ranyuxhkln, new Russian envoy to the TJnlted States, arrives in New York aboard tho liner Mnuretanla. Asked whether he hoped to pro- mote bettor Sovlet-U. S. rela- tions, Panyushkln said: "Every- thing Is possible under the sun." (A.P. Wirephoto.) 12 Killed in Plane Crash After Tucson Take-off Tuciion, Arli. Twelve of th Committee to Act A subpoena, or order, for Ander- son to produce this information would be issued by the approprla- ,lonn committee. Taft salt! tho committee wants Anderson to provide all tho Infor- mation that he has covering "every- body." Senator Ferguson a member of the 'appropriations 'com- mittee, sold he was for Chairman Bridges and. told reporters the committee Intends to- An- dcrson for all of the information he las "regardless of where- tho chips fall." He said the steps to subpoena, An- derson will be taken' at the meeting of the appropriations committee, Railroad Associates charity, will accept cash contribu- tions and further donations, such as materials for tho construction and furnishing of ths home, and related labor. Because federal laws require that a responsible organization must sponsor the charity, and contribu- tions to the charity thus become ex- empt from Income tax payments, it was explained at the meeting that the Knights of Columbus council had agreed to be the sponsoring or- ganization. Funds expended for dis- abled veterans will be administered by trustees of the council who will bo trustees of the welfare fund and who will work with the fund's steer- Ipg committee, made up of represen- tatives of nil civic organizations par- ticipating. Only requirements of recipients of the fund are that they must be disabled and must have served in the military forces of the United States government. Approved by Bureau Approval of the establishment of tho Veterans Welfare Fund has been given by tho Bureau of Internal Revenue and legal work necessary for setting up1 the organization has been handled for the group by M. J. Qalvln of St. Paul, former Wl- nona attorney and state senator from Wlnona county. Tho fund full control of the home in the event of Sergeant Lnuer's death, A meeting of the steering com- mittee of the Wlnona Veterans Wel- fare Fund will be held at 9 p. m. Thursday at the K. C, club to work on details of tho campaign. Allis-Chalmers Local Disbands Milwaukee The Independ- ent Workers of Allis-Chalmers, which once claimed more than members, was disbanded last night at a meeting attended by only 12 persons. The unafflllatcd union was form- ed during last year's long, abortive strike staged by Local 248 tr.A.W.- C.I.O. at the huge West AlHs Allls- Chalmors plant by workers who rejected the local's leadership and returned to their Jobs at the struck plant. The I.W.A.C. opposed Local 248 In bargaining elections conducted by the Wisconsin employment rela- blons board and by the NLRB, run- ning a close second to the U.A.W. local In both casos. No clear-cut decision wan reached in either elec- tion, last summer's NLRB action still pending on the outcome of a counting of challenged ballots. Following the removal of Local 24B's officers by the international U.A.W. lust week and the appoint- ment of an administrator for the jroup, the I.W.A.C. executive board voted to submit a disbanding pro-] posal to tho membership. St, Paul More than 300 officials and associates of the Chi- cago Northwestern railroad feted Carl R. Gray, Jr., at a farewell banquet at the Midway club last night. Gray, to become Veterans administrator on January 1, just retired as a vice-president of the road. Wounded Vet Shoots Off Aching Leg Johnstown, Pa. A Jap bullet shattered the left leg of Lawrence Westovcr, 39, In New Guinea. An army surgeon used a sil- ver plate to strengthen It but this was later removed. West- over said -he suffered terrible pains and treatment "didn't seem to help." Finally ho could stand it .no more. State Policeman Matthew J. O'Brien reported Westover went out on his back porch last night and blasted the aching leg off with a 12-gaugc shot- gun. In a hospital, surgeons com- pleted the below-the-knec am- putation. 20 crew members of a Jamaica- bound B-29 died ill tho flaming wreckage of the four-cnglncd bomb- er a few minutes after taking from Davls-Monthan Field Jos: night, Major D. D. Burke, press relations officer, announced today The casualty list Js being with- held pending notification cf the next of kin and an army board o: Inquiry will 'today begin to probe tho cause of the crash, Tho base reported the. riilp hat Just taken off from tho field one was within sight of tho tower when It crashed In flames. The announcement said ttvo of i tho 40th squadron of the second 'bomb group at 'Davls-Mon- than took, off shortly'after 7 p. m laden with fuel and bound oh a nonstop flight to Vernam Field Jamaica. One of the- ships was slowly gain- ing altitude when It Is believed to have banked In an effort to return and -crashed into the desert ap- proximately five miles southwcsl of the base and In an uninhabited section of surburban Tucson, It caught fire almost Instantly. Seconds later crash wagons and fire trucks had been dispatched from the base tower toward the 50- foot flames. Arizona Highway Patrolman Wal- ter Skcets said: Eljhl Walk Away 'I saw eight men leaving tho crush area, dazed and shaken. Mi- raculously, all were walking and did not appear to be badly hurt al- though one of them was obviously suffering from burns. I didn't bother asking them the cause of the crash, being more anxious to get them to the hospital." Unofficial reports said one en- gine, possibly two, failed a few minutes after the take-off. Base officials say the cause will not be officially known until the inquiry board completes Its investigation. There was no Immediate explo- sion as the plane hit the ground, according to witnesses. The first explosion followed about 15 min- utes later and a second 45 minutes after the crash. Wisconsin Fairs Association to Meet Madison, Wis. The Wis- consin Association of Fairs will hold Us annual convention in Milwaukee January 7 and 8, Charles Drewry. of Marinette, president, announced ;oday. Carl H. Gray, Jr., taking office January 1 as veterans admin- istrator, pulled tho bell cord of a candy locomotive at n dinner at St. Paul which 300 officials and associates of the Chicago North West- ern railroad attended. The locomotive weighed 125 pounds. A pic- ture of the road's flrst engine was used as a model for the ancient woodburner, complete to licorice sticks In the.fuel box for cordwood. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) 30 Per Cent Cut Debated In House Committee Early Start on Marshall Plan Tru- man today signed the stop-gap European aid bill. Aides disclosed that the bill was signed at a. m. (E.S.T.) In the President's office without ceremony. Only members of the staff witnessed the signing. Yesterday, Presidential Press Sec- retary Charles O. Ross told re- porters a special ceremony planned to emphasize the Impor- Cargo on Way or American coal and (rain moved toward France to- day the flint dividend of plan to rush hnlp lo Europe. Government dta- cIoKd that carrots of American supplies to be paid for with CT. S. left East cout within the past few in an- ticipation ot President Truman's signature of the bill. tance of the measure. But Ross told reporters today thnt the President found It Impossible arrange a ceremonial signing bc- of the difficulty of getting to the While Houne nt one time Ml of those who had a major part la the passage of the legislation. House Cnt The anounccmcnt that the mcas- use had been signed came as House went buck, to debating the cut 'Its appropriation! committee recommended In the program. It was part of a 30 per cent trimming the' commutes made In a. measure to foreign and nnd army oc- cupation costs. Tho measure went to the HOUM floor with an appropriations com- mittee recommendatlcin that total aiked by dent Truman be shaved by L. Willie some members voiced satisfaction with the cuts In the stop-gap foreign aid and occupation funds. Chairman Tabcr  y a special committee headed by Representative Hcrtcr   or managing long range aid. hrough a government lorporatlon. Before getting the hearings under way, however, the committee plan- ned to act on a suggestion from Representative Francis Case (R.- S. D.) that the administration be asked for all details on the dis- mantling of German industrial linns for reparations payments and European recovery may have been affected. For the emergency aid program, ntcndcd to help France, Italy and Lustria through the winter, the ap- troprlations committee chopped from the President's cqucst for And It rimmed hla estimate f to meet army need! n Germany, Japan, Korea and oth- r occupied areas. 57 Communities o Send Queens to St. Paul Carnival St. Paul winter car- ilval officials announced today that 7 Midwest communities had aJ- eady signified their Intention of ending queens to the annual pag- ant, to be held here January 31 JirouKh February 8. All queens will be guests at a flro ucen ball late In the week, with 1C winner of a contest at that time o become part of the royalty at ic 1949 carnival. Minnesota communities that will nd entrants for tills contest m- ludc: Caledonia, Chatficld, Lake City, Plalnvlcw, Preston, Rushford, t. Charles, Spring Valley and Wa- asha.   

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