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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, December 13, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 13, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER i nntt lunlthli NuniU r.riir rltttf. Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations w INONA a CM> Audltorim VOLUME 47. NO. 253 WJNONA. MINNESOTA, SATURDAY. EVENING. DECEMBER 13. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Dancers Help Swell Good Fellows Fund HANKS forth today to tho of tho Winona tlon who swelled thr Good Fol- fund by M a result of the Battle of Muslo held thr Hod wlgwnm Mondny evening. Tile Tlod Men also nrn thanked for their Klft of the hall. Meantime grow, como dnlly to tho Good Fellow edi- desk. Knch n personal appeal for a visit from Hnntn Thoy come from mothers, and Knch nsks for clothing, and wearing nppnrel to keep out the Minnesota cold. 80 this weekend, give a thought to the Oood yellows, Tho days between now and Christmas nro wowing fewer, The time In which the buying can be dons Is growing shorter hour by hour. So this weekend In your medi- think of those needy little children who will not have a Chrlst- this year unless the Oood Fel- help. Then and them make up your mind to be a Oood Fellow nnd mnko a contribution to the Oood fund. It U Mmple to do. Mall or brlnit your cheek, cnsh or Klft to the Oood Fellows, The Hcpublloan- Merald, The Oood a legal charity. Contnlbutlonx are deductible from Inromo tnx. He ft Oood Follow this ynar, Kn- roll today by malting or bringing In your contribution. Help thn Oood brlnK to the needy children of community. A Good Fellow The following a Hot of contri- to the Oood fund to date: listed .......f Wlnnna elation Naney Ann Gorman.... 5.00 Calrln and John mtetilrr............. S.OO A friend............... 2.00 Wlnrma Herald K9M Kepuhlloan-HeraM ployrm 45.N Knit Stwlnr eluh Anne Klnjf 1.00 Sadie K. Knight....... 1.00 Helfert-Baldwin Motor Company JS.tO Mr. and A. C. K. J.M A Friend from Wabwha Club No, 1 and Towrwenit llnrr.Y Tiulek Christmas Comes Early For Stricken Winona Girl Republican-Herald Photo A filttlfi Added Touch In given to tho Ohrlatman troo by Pntrlcln'n mother, MM. John McDonald. Tho blnck woolly dog glvon by her dnddy ittancU guard over Patricia's glfta, beneath tho tree. Patricia Marie McDonald Is having her Christmas early. The gaily decorated Christmas tree with Its bright lights already Is In place, arid tlie little black woolly dog given her by her daddy stands guard beneath the tree over the gifts presented to the little three-year-old girl. The angels are coming for Patricia. She ii growing very weak and can hardly lift her head to look at her toys. A year ago Patricia, then two and a half, the only child of Mr. and Mrs, John Mc- 200 Grand street, played about the normal child. However, shortly afterward she was taken sick, and her parents took her to the Mayo Clinic at Rochester. After an examination and operation, the doctors there informed the parents that Patri- cia had only three or four months to live. That was last March. She was suffering from a rare disease among Incurable cancer- ous disease that has gradually weakened the child. Her condition Is such now that her par- ents moved their Chrlntmas for Patricia nhcad, so she will bo hero with them. Patricia's daddy and mama arranged with Santa for a beautiful Christmas tree and have decorated it gaily with bright ornaments, brilliant lights and all those other things that children love. Patricia enjoys the tree from her buggy and looks constantly at her toys Including the little black woolly dog from daddy. Word has gone out to relatives and friends that Patricia is having her Christmas early this year and additional gifts are arriving. Each Is opened carefully by her parents. They bring a weak smile to Patricia's thin face. The clock ticks on Patricia is growing weaker but she is having her Christmas. Her many friends and all those who love little chil- dren are contributing to the fleeting Joy that comes with the arrival of each gift. Santa has pushed his schedule and calendar has made a special trip to this little girl's home. The glad tidings of the birth of the Christ child are ringing out above the sorrow at the McDonald home on Grand street this year. "Briny m at IcnoUi, we -pray. Into the courts of Jlcavcn, Into tlic Endless day." The AnirelK Are Cotninff toon for Patricia Marie McDonald. threc-und-onc-half-yenr-old Rlrl pictured above. Tho photograph was taken a year ago at before ahe stricken with fatal disease. Early End to Treaty Talks Seen 9r w% 11 i Standard Lumber Corn- puny MS 2.00 2.00 11.00 ToUl noun rnule II, O, lUlley, Allurn clothing. Weather Winonn nnd vicinity: Cloudy with flurries tonight: moderate tompernturn, low Sun- day, pnrtly oloudy to cloudy, be- oomlnff colder Sundny night; hint) with imow In the nftnrnoon 37. MlnneaOtit: Cloudy north, partly cloudy nouth portion tonight. Strong shifting with heixvler amounts of imow likely northeast nnd extreme north por- tions tonight. Suriduy partly cloudy nouth. Know flurries north, A little warmer xotithwent portion tonight nnd flunduy, cithrrwUo llttlo change In temperature. wiow with north Mostly cloudy south, strong southeasterly portion tonight. Sun. dny shifting winds with snow flurries except heavier of snow extreme north portion In fore- noon. Diminishing winds Into Stin- dny. Continued rnthrr cold. I.OCAl. WKATIIKIt Official observations for tho 34 hours ending nt 13 m. todny: Maximum, 20; minimum, ill; noon, precipitation, none: sun sets to- niKht nt sun rises tomorrow nt TKMI'KHATtJUKH KI.MKWIIKllK Miix, Mln. I'riio Mriiilctji 17 a ChlrHtK............37 2-1 Denver !ll lids AnKi'lr.s On Miami 70 r'nul...... VI NenUle M -III T'honlx (10 114 DAILY ItlVKH ItUMiKTIN flood Hinge S4- i Todny Change Lewis Takes Miners Out Of A.F. of L By Harold W. Ward L. Lewi divorced miner from the A, F. L. again In a mov viewed by labor men today at a that he to play Independent In the 1948 preil dontlnl election. The split between thi United Mine and the American Federation of Laboi oamo 11 years after marched them out of the paren body and low than two years after he marched thorn in attain. It wni no Tho 07-year-old hnd had hat in hand ever since tho last A.F.L, convention, when tho executive council refused to go along with him in an all-out fight the non-communist pro- vlxlon of tho Tuft-Hartley net. The formal break came lost night with a typical gesture of con- tempt and a typical flvo nyilablo word which fell like an "dtiiaffillate." DNnffllUte' "Oroon, A.F.L. dlflnfllUntc These scrawled in greor crayon on a torn-off half sheet ol cheap paper, wore all tho notice President William Oroen of tho A.F.L. In New York, Oroon said only thnt he was "very worry Indeed" to learn thnt Lewis nnd his mlno hnd pulled out of tho federation. Ho said ho hnd not neon the mlno londor'8 monsngo, but expected to nnd It waiting for htm nt offlco today. Whllo other union officials do- clined to bo ornl tinld n quoted offhand, aev- dcxlro by Lewis for 18 50 74 13 Trace ,01 2.B n.t 4.6 a ,6 5.4 o.n 0.2 7.6 .1 U.2 Rerl WlnK 14 I.nke Oily....... Dntil 4, T. W...... Dntn ft, V. W...... Diuii SA, T. W..... Wlnoim 13 Onm Pool Diim 7, Pool Dukotu Dnrn 7, Pool...... Onm 7, T. W...... Ln Crosv 13 Tributary Chlppewn nt Durnnd.. Zumbro nt Thellmnn., 3.4 Buffalo above 3.0 Tremprnlenu nt Dodge, 1.7 Black nt Onlcsvllle..... Ln Crowe nt W, Snlom Root nt Hoimton ItlVKIt KOKKCAHT (from to Inwul During tho next 4H there will bo no material ctmiiKo through- out this river district. Thickness Of i .1 4- .1 -H .1 political independence next year probably tho end, In view of lil.i strnlncd relntlom wltii other AJ'.L. londera thoy It wax likely thnt ho did 'not wnnt to bo committed to whntover poll- tlcnl role mny be played by tho new A.F.L, "Inbor'H oducntlonal nnd political Lewla exhibited his political Indopnnclonco before. Ho broke with tho In 1040 when tho C.T.O. plumped for President Hooso- velt ngnlnnt wlxhoK. Coiinnll Another Car Hit on Crossing; Cardboard Windows Block View Patrolman Fred Brunt examines the cardboard in the window of n car which was driven through operating automatic railroad slgnnls onto the tracks and into the path of the fast No. 56 passenger train of tho Milwaukee railroad shortly before midnight Friday. Police said that vision in the opposite direc- tion was also prevented by a cardboard "window." This photograph was taken by Winona police.________ The after yonrn with the A.F.L., hnd Joined the C.I.O. In 1030 during tho gront split be- twoun of craft and In- duntrlal typo unlon.i which Lewis hlmnelf brought about, Tho onrnn buck to tho A.F.L..In January, 1040, and Lewis promptly elected to tho 15- membor executive council. Mo quit tho council at tho Octo- ber convention In Sun Francisco when thn mombnrn voted to chnngu tlin no thnt thoy would not bo "omcorn" of tho A.r.L. with- in tho moaning of the Taft-Hartloy net. Tho announcement of tho now tee on DIP now to nix nvnniKoo minor walkout from tho federation onmo from K. C. Adams, editor of the U.M.W. Journal, at the end of a wook-lonK mooting of tho executive board. Also announced after tho execu- tive mooting was tho election of Thomns Kennedy of Hazolton, Pa., to bo a U.M.W. vice-president suc- ceeding tho late John O'Lcary. John of Cambridge, Ohio, was named to tho post of secretory trcnimrer' which Kennedy hnd hold since 1034, Baron Rayleigh' Noted Physician, Succumbs Wlihnm, KnKland Baron 72, noted British phy- nlolHt, died nt his homo today after heart attack. Continued Price Support for Farm Urged Colorado Colo. Conllnuod prlco support for agrlcul uro products nfter tho present pro rnm expires at tho end of 1048 were ccommcndcd Friday at tho closing sosslon of tho National Production and Farm Marketing conference. Tho mooting of farm officials rep- resenting all 48 stated took no action on various committee reports which wore made at the request of depart- ment of'Agriculture officials moot- ing with P.M.A, itlnln ofrinorrt for tho first time. recommendations by tho national organization which, It was learned were made nt tho closing administrative session Included: 1, Election of-county committees to administer farm programs anfl policies at tho county level. 3. Increased total payments for conservation practices. 3. Continuation of tho rural elec- trification and ochool lunch pro- grams. 4. Assistance for tho expansion of bonafldo farm cooperatives. 8. Federal and state assistance for housing migratory labor, 0. Closer cooperation between Washington and tho state and field P.M.A. and Commodity Credit Cor- poration offices. 7, Improvement of marketing fa- cilities. 8, Support of cotton, wheat, cattle and other basic commodities at from 75 to 00 per cent of parity after of ,'ioybcans and 1048. 0. Designation flax seed ns basic commodities. Minnesotan Among Labrador Crash Victims Corporal Nor- man J. Jensen, Robblnsdnlo, Minn., was ono of tho 23 men who died In tho crash of an army transport piano at Goose Bay, Labrador, the air force announced last night. Arthur Frye, 46, io V D Taken to Hospital, O lOUtilS Beat Injuries Checked A.Winonan, drlvlug with card- board "windows" on either side of him, drove through flashing red sig- nals on Hamilton street about p. m, Friday nnd Into the path of tho enstbound Milwaukee passenger train. The driver, Arthur Frye, 48. 451 East Wabasha street, is in tho Wl- nonn General hospital with a cut on his neck and a back Injury. wero to bo taken today to deter- mine the extent of the back in- jury. Second Mishap of Dny It was the second accident on the Mllwnulcna li'nckn Friday, the nlxl.li on Milwaukee road croHNlnKH In t.hu city in the last three weeks. Two more occurred earlier this on Grand, another on Main street. The October accident, which be- gan this snrles of train-car colli- sions, wan on Main which Is equipped wll.h automatic signals Until the accident last night, al! others had occurred on crossings not equipped with tho automatic type signals. In tho clghii accidents, six persons have boon Injured, throe of them n week ago In one accident at the Wlnonn street crossing. Frye was driving north on Hamll- (Contlnucd on Page 3, Column 5) ANOTHER CAR 9 SHOPPING DAYS LEFT Minneapolis Streetcar Driver E, Lal- lak, 24, a streetcar motorman, was dragged from his car and beaten up by eight youths early today. A youth he identified as one of his assailants was arrested a short tlmo later. LaUalc was taken to Northwest- ern hospital suffering from a broken Jaw, loss of four teeth and bruises, Lallak told police the eight hnd boon pnsscnKfirs on Uin Robblnsdnlc car ho WMN nmnlntf. Tin put three or thorn oir bccnuxu they liivd become too boisterous and the oth- er five got off two blocks farther on. Commodity Trading May Get Full Probe .By Donald The Senate appropriations committee today promised an early decision, on whe- ther to touch off a full scale in- vestigation of commodity market speculation by government officials Tho group decided in any case that it wishes to-hear further from Edwin W. Pauley, special assistant to the secretary of the Army, who already has disclosed himself as a speculator in the million dollar class The date of the next appearance Oy Pauley, a former Democratic na- tional treasurer, has yet to be fixed Chairman Bridges (R.-N. said ihc decision whether to expand the .nqulry will be made after the com- mltteo examines reports from the lieads of flvo government depart- ments on whether any of their personnel arc using Inside knowl- edge to profit In the grain markets Bridges told a reporter this prob- ably will be done early next week, since the committee has been vised that checks are under way in the Slate, Treasury nnd Agricul- ;uro. departments. The committee ias asked for similar information rom the departments of Commerce and National Defense. Pauley told the committee yester- day that.there was "no impropriety" in his trading In commodities. He said he has disposed of nine- tenths of his holdings since he became Royall's aide last September 3 and that lie is "worse off" n. result. He agreed to come back later with a record of all his commodity trans- lations during Ihc period lie has jccn in the government service. He ;old the senators his holdings when came to the department of the Army were something under 300. Senator Ferguson ;ald J. M. Mchl, administrator of ,he authority, told him the law orbids forwarding the list U> Con- gress. Ferguson insisted the compila- lon of traders buylnu more than bushels of grain on one market was made specifically for the information of Congress. Tho committee chairman said he oes no ni'ed for Inquiry ink) NpnciiliiMon by miimbrj'.s of Joiigrens or the Judiciary as sug- ;cstcd by Pauley and his boss, Scc- etary of the Army Royall, 17 Killed in Train Accident in France Clermont-Ferrand, France A switching error killed 17 perso: and injured 20 others, some of then critically, when a fast Interurbnr Diesel train met a freight and pas senger train headon In tho outskirts of Klom last night. River Search For Weckler Clues Planned Madlion, Win. An extcn slvo search of tho lower Wisconsi river will start Monday In the hope of uncovering clues in the mys tcrlous disappearance of elgh' year-old Georgia Jean Wecklc Port Atkinson, form girl. At a conference Friday law en forcement officers and state agcnc representatives agreed to drag th river at bridges in saveral coun ;ics. Supervising tho dragging opera tlons will be n, committee compose of Sheriffs E. A. Fischer of Dan county and J. Riley Stone of Sau county, and representatives of th public service commission, the con servation department and the Unl verslty of Wisconsin's life savin station. Start on Blue River Search will start at the Blu river tributary where authoritle. 'ound the body of Carl L. Carlson University of Wisconsin student whom Buford Sennett, 22, of Rich and Center, and Robert Wlnslow 25, Owen, have confessed slaying, Wlnslow has been cleared by au thorltlcs of any knowledge of th Weckler case. Sennett has denlcc mplicatlon In the case but has refused to submit to a lie detecto est. The committee plans to drag a other points, scorching when th iver is at the lowest point. Flow if tho river is controlled by dams. Evidence to Be Coordinated The conference was called to co- irdinate evidence obtained in the Weckler case. Among those attend- ng were District Attorneys Fran- Is J. Garlty of Jefferson county Edwin Wllkle of Dana county and Leo P. Lownlk of Rlchland county Assistant Attorney General William Plate, and Charles M. Wilson end of the state crime laboratory, It: also wns decided (Jint in tho future nil Information about the caso would como through" the office of District Attorney Garlty at Jef- ferson. U Tho Towboat Cairo pushes a plow-equipped barse down the Mississippi river to clear a channel for a string of three barge tows bringing coal to the Twin Cities area, sorely in need of more fuel because of the early winter. In Lake Pepln yesterday, the Ice breaker cut through Ice up to 1G Inches thick. This picture was tnkcn as the Cniro was golnff through Lake Pepln. It passed Winona at lost night nnd reached (.he Genoa dnm at a. m. today. (See slory on Page 3.) (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republi- can-Herald.) Recess Called' To Permit Cooling Off Molotov Attack Dampens Hope for Any Accord London The foreign min- isters' session scheduled for today WM- portponcd until Monday oa British-Initiative, in order to allow tempers to cool after lijst nlfhtl violent argument. The postponement was announced ay the conference secretariat. A member of the TJ. S. delegation sold it was agreed that another session today would only result In. quick tempers and confusion, two-day recess will give the minis- ters time to plan a course of action. Authoritative sources said American delegation agreed the conference was "hopelessly dead- ockcd" on the subject of repara- tions and that without agreement on reparations, discussion of eco- nomic and other subjects was use- ess. Secretary Marshall is expected to decide over Uio weekend whether to try nnd break off the conference mmedlntely or go through, the 'unction of finishing the agenda before doing it. Part of the decision will depend on the attitude of For- eign Minister Molotov of Russia at Jie opening of the Monday ilolotov was understood to be wili- ng that, the sessions continue. A Soviet spokesman said the future of the parley would- depend on Somo of Marshall's advisers said, privately they believed Molotov'i attack yestcrdaj', when he de- nounced the whole range of the western powers' policy in Germany, lad killed all hope even for super- icial Big Four agreements on Ger- many and that little U anything ould be accomplished by going oa icre. Others contended Marshall might >cttcr avoid a move to end the onference Immediately because of the possibility of the upsetting er- ects throughout Europe of euch a ormol Big Four break. The speech In which, as some western diplomats said, threw the book" at Marshall, Bcvln nnd Bictnult came as R sur- rlsc, brcaunc delegations of the Western jjowont went. Into ycnter- ay's meeting expecting a continua- on of Molotov's mild, conciliatory Actlcs of last week. Bevln Calls Speech 'An Insult' What he charged had all bcca aid by various Soviet officials oe ropagonda agencies before. Molo- ov charged the Western ere profiting on German exports. ere buying up German firms, were Illng up economic obligation on jcrniany and trying to "perpetuate IB division of Germany." All this, Molotov declared, art of a strategic scheme to con- ert the western zones into a basis or on attack on tlic is the f Europe, What was new, however, accord- 4j to American officials, was to ave Molotov organize all these largcs into a single bombshell speech and explode it in the f Marshall, Bcvln and Bidault. Unong them the three had already enled each of the charges. In ringing up the some points again olotov hnd in effect labeled their cnlols as false. When Molotov finished, Marshall eclnrcd that Molotov's "method of roccdure mokes it rather dlflfcult inspire respect for the dignity of ic Soviet union." Bcvln plunged swinging verbal blows, Molotov. e said, had dealt to tlic other for- jn ministers "Insults" nnd "abuse" :ilch would be resented by the topic of the British empire.   

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