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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: December 10, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 10, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER onlltrr tunlghtt fair ftnd T OMORROW iii Thursday Full Wire Newa Report of Tho Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulath VOLUME 41. NO. 250 WINONA. MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 10. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES More Funds Needed This Christmas NFliATXD are onuMrn hard- nhlp In many homed, especial- ly those with low and families, ed enoh day by the Good editor reveal thin new Munition fndnK the Republicans Map Price Program 'VM nlitntlon ycnr, thin on top of this, Good Fellow buyers urn finding the ctKtt of needed articles, like shoes, and sweaters, iwt well as un- derwear much than former years, A bill (looan't go very far In FqulppJnK n child, onn of the unlcl thl.i rnnrntiiK. It taken morn money thl.i year. The for morn funds corned from the workrrn. The need Id greater. Thp cost of clothing In higher, workers who have close con toots wllli the children ask thf OfKxl Fellows to (IlK In thntr pofXcu n bit tlrnpcr thin your so the work tnn br cnrrlrd forward on th" standard fin other years, No children In Wlnoim should be without n Klft this Christmas, Already art) In op- rrntlon, inoups of children are re- porting regularly to be fitted tor and clothing. There U a lonit wnltttlK Hut ttmt mUfit be retw.hed brfore Christmas eve, No purchases, of course, onn be made until the funds are available. The Oocxl Fellows Is a ittrlctly oivih on the line organlKatlon, the uppflul noes forth to the Good Follows from their workers on tho Job to come forth early and their contributions Alma Man Killed, Wife Hurt 29 Feared In Reno, Nev., Auto Mishap Alma, WIs. An Alma man WM and hlx wife fluf- fered nerlow head and nhouldcr In- juries In an automobile accident near Reno. Tuesday afternoon. Bert F, Kopp, 83, was killed and hb wife In In itorloiu condition, in a Reno hospital. Tho two were re- turn I nil here after their son, Arnold, In Bun Rafael, Calif, They hud left Alma November 38, ex- pecting to be lor three wockfl. Mr., Kopp was born in Tamarack Vnlloy near Oalesvlllo, WIs., ond later married Ullle Phillips In June, 1018. They moved here two years are his wife, three ago, children, Mrs. Gale (Kathryn) Potter, Genoa, Wla., Arnold, Son Rafael, Calif., and John, Glyndon, Minn.; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kopp, Trempealeau; four brothers, Guy, Sparta, WIs., Roy, Nekoasa, WIs., Lloyd, La Crosse, and Gerald, Trempealeau; a sister, Mrs. B. H. (Blanche) Trim; and five grandchildren. Mull or brine It to The Repub- Hcan.Hcrald and workers will carry on from there. Be a Good Fellow following a Hut of con- to the Oood fund to dute: Mr. and William Allomann............. Mra, r.. n. Aniwbolln K. A Kellogg Doniw Mae Nelnon, clothing. ____ Girl Rusheslo Accused Father; Mistrial Declared Chloago rrank Orlswold. M-year-old former policeman, in criminal court Tuesday as a Jury was being selected to try him on a chargt of murdering his wife. Nearby, sat Orlswolct's 11-year- old daughter, Deth. principal witness for the state which contended she an eyewitness to the slaying of her mother, Suddenly. Beth flung herself into her father's arms, to the surprise of Prosecutor Kdmund Grant who promptly asked Judge Charles nymfl to rule the proceedings a mis- trial, Orant nivld the girl's action was the first indication of her sym- pathies and might alter the course of the trial. Judge ityrne declared a mistrial and net the cose over for a nevr trial on January B. Sennett's Yard Dug Up in Hunt For Clues to Missing Weckler Girl By The Associated Press Lnw from Bovornl counties -wont dig glng In a convict's back yard yesterday for clues to the dtanppoaranco of ft Port Atkinson farm girl, and discovered, Dane County District Attor- ney Edwin WUIelo nalcl. "certain evidential material" which he Is "not In a position to disclose now. The Authorities gathered yesterday at the Rlc hlund Center home of Buford Bennett, 22, to in- vontliiate reports that ho and Robert Wlnslow, 28. had been digging In tho yard. Scnnett and Wlnslow recently were sentenced to Floyd Shafer Convicted of Manslaughter Menomnnlfi, Win. Chargoi originally with third degree murder Floyd Shafer, 37-year-old laborer was convicted Tuesday of first de manslaughter In the death March a of Lawrence Christiansen 45. and sentenced to serve five t> ten years In the Waupun state prl son. The had askod conviction for third degree murder, contendln Shafer Knocked the older man down twice, then returned and knockei him down again with the blow th state contends caused Christiansen' death. The defense, which asserted Ohrlstianion had imprope advances to Shafer and that th beating was tdmlnUtered in pun Ishment, sought a verdict of fourth degree manslaughter on the ground was no Intent to do grea bodily harm because no weapon had been An application lor Shaftr's -pro- bation will be heard later in th Weather rXDKItAt, rORKCAMTM unct vicinity Clearing and colder tonight; low ton In tho city five in rural arens. Thursday generally fnlr and quite cold; high Decreasing cloudiness and much colder with sutworo tem- lonlKhl. Thursday partly cloudy. Rising temperatures north west portion In afternoon, cloudiness and rolclnr tonight. Thursday part- ly cloudy. WKATIiril Offirlnl observations for the 34 hours ending nt 13 m, today: Maximum, 27; minimum, 10; noon, 31; precipitation, .03; snowfall one- half Inch; sun sets tonlKht at sun rises tomorrow at TKMI'KllATUKKS Max. Mln. Preo. nemlrtjl 13 10 -M Chlcngn............ 2l> 27 84 14 BPS Molnrs .......-23 21 .10 DulUlh............. 13 13 Lfin AriKele.i fll Miami "W '3 Mlnneapolls-Ml. Paul 14 12 .04 New Orleans 03 (10 Phornix............ M 2B Washington to 20 KrKlrm 11 DAILY IHVF.n HUI.fcF.TIN Flood Stage 34-Hr. Stnito Today Change Wife .In Court The defendant's wife, two of his four small children and other rela- tives were In court when sentence was Imposed. Sharer was on the stand most o the morning Tuesday, testifying in his own defense. reiterated statements made to authorities after his arrest in WI- nona, a fow days after the killing, to the effect that ho had teuton Christiansen to "teach him a lesson" after the farmhand had made Improper advances to him In two Menomonto taverns on the night of March a, Tills ef Drive Me told of how he had driven Christiansen to a point near where highway 13 crosses the Red Oodar river and them knocked him down twice. Returning to the scene later he Mid. ho saw Christiansen stand- Ing against a tree and approached him and asked him If he wanted a asserted, Chrlstlonson rlclc. Then he slopped toward him and thought tho farmhand might have a woapoi In his hand and he struck him to the itround again, leaving him where he foil. Testimony He said that on vIMtlng the scene still a third time with members of his party, he found Christiansen lying face down, but believed he was still breathing. In his closing argument, District Attorney Smith rlppod at this point In Shufor's testimony, referring to testimony given Monday by Fran- cis Reid, one of tho party with whom Shnfcr was drinking In the taverns. Rolcl saUl that when ho drove with Shafcr to tho wcono of tho affray, Shafor came back to the car nflor examining tho prostrate man and said ho bollovocl Christiansen might bo (load. The prosecutor also amalled IK-d City Dum 4, T, Dnm B. T. W Dam BA, T. W. Wtnonu (C.P.) Dnm fl, Pool Dam n, T. W. 14 2.7 4.6 3.7 P.H 7..1 (1.2 2.3 .1 .1 .1 .3 Dam 7, f'txil Darn 7, T. W..... IM Crow .13 4.0 .1 Tributary Sir____ Chlppewu nt Durnncl.. 4.8 .3 Zumbro lit 2.3 .1 Buffalo above Alma... Black nl Oulesvllle---- 3.0 -h .1 La Crosse ut W. ttalom 1.7 .8 Root (vt Houston...'.... 8.7 .1 HIVKlt KOKKCA8T (from lo Oullenberg, Iowa) Durlna thf next fow clays, there be no Important change oxoopt H slight cleort'iisri In stream flow tho remainder of tho week. Shafer as a "brutal coward for having left Christiansen lying help- less on tho ground when the temp- erature was around 30 degrees. Air Hunt Started for Mining Plane Athens Greek, British and American planes started a search at dawn today for an American C-47 military trannport plane Ing slnco last night with four per- sons aboard. Mnssanl airport officials said they feared tho to the U, 8. military attache's office In have crash-landed In the sea off the AUca coast. 18 Arabs Flee Acre Prison Jerusalem Eighteen Arab eonvlcU In Acre prison today while of the town of engaged prison guards with gunfire, It was an- nounced officially. A release salil the Arab prisoners, separated from Jew- ish after flghtl follow- ing- the announcement of United Nations vote to partition I'almtlne, had overpowered and bound the warden. Wlnslow recently were llfo at Waupun for the murder o a University of Wisconsin medica student, Carl Carlson, 25, of Su pcrlor, prior to the repeated rapln of his- sister-in-law, a University o Michigan coed. Now interest was aroused In Sen nott after it was learned he one owned a car similar to one tha was soon near the George Woekle farm home- May 1, -the day tha Wockler's eight-year-old daughter Georgia Jean, disappeared whll returning home from school. N wero injured, ino of them severely burned. McCarthy Says Army Overpaid For Cuban Sugar Washington Senator Jos- eph McCarthy (R.-Wls.) said Tues- day that the army by "subterfuge" violated -the law by paying more than the world market price for Cuban sugar. In a heated exchange with an army department official before the Senate appropriations committee McCarthy said tho army paid about a hundred pounds more than the market price for tons of Cuban sugar lant October. Tracy S. Voorhecu, special as- sistant to Secretary of the Army Kenneth Royall, told McCarthy the army bought the sugar from the Department of Agriculture because "There was not other place we could got this quantity of sugar1' with comparable delivery dates. .MpCarthy Clies Imw, Dead in Plane Crash Wreckage of A.T.C. Transport Sighted at Labrador Wentovcr Field, Mass. A big A.T.C. transport plane carrying 20 ten crew members and 19 mili- tary passengers crashed and burn- ed Just before midnight in the Icy wilderness north of Goose Bay Lab- rador. The number of if any was unknown. From the air, one man could be seen in the center of the wreck- age .waving his arms. "Whether he Is one of the surviv- ors or a member of tho ground rescue crew sent out from the Goose Bay airfield is a spokes- man at the Air Transport Command headquarters here said. Tho big plane military equiva- lent of the DC-4 type planes used by commercial airlines crashed about eight miles north of Goose Bay Just after a take-off on an un- scheduled flight from the Labrador airfield to Westover field with mall and cargo. Stormy weather hampered res- cuers who set out at dawn today by ground and air after a Ninth alr- forco reconnalsance plane sighted burning wreckage." The big plane similar to the DC-4 flown by commercial airlines capable of carrying 40 passen- gers. Preparations were mado to fly a helicopter to tho crash scene. Tho area where tho big transport crashed Is heavily forested. Westover personnel command of- price for or from subsidizing thrlndustry, and asked: you aware'-.that the army .that toy "You are making so many state- ments that I think arc not in ac- cordance with the facts that I do not think I should Voor- tues replied. The Wisconsin Republican said that 'at the time of the army's transaction with the Agriculture de- portment: sugar brokers were quot- ing sugar at from to for 100 pounds in Cuba. But the army paid he said. Voorhecs said the army could not get the lower price "for com- parable delivery and for comparable but he acknowledged he did'not check on. tho world price at the time. Arrlcnliure Department Buys He said as a 'matter of policy the army has the Agriculture depart- ment do all its food purchasing. McCarthy said that although this country had contracted for the mlk of the Cuban sugar crop, .it had allowed Cuba tons of 'free export sugar" which he said was then "going begging for a customer." Later, ho said, the Commodity Credit Corporation bought this sugar and "paid above tho market jrice for It." A letter from Royall to McCarthy was read into the record denying a statement by McCarthy that the sugar was bought with "tho money which wo Ctho Congress) appropri- ated for guns and chinery to make this nation McCarthy said he agreed this was probably true. Flivver Fliers Complete Globed Trip Mr. And Mrs, Georjre Truman, left, and Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Evans, stand In front of Evans' plane as the two former army fliers were greeted by their wives on the completion of their leisurely 123-day Klobc-clrcllng flight in two pint-sized, 100-horsepower filwer .planes. Truman and Evans landed at the Teterboro, N. J., airport today on the final lap from Harrlsburg, Pa. (A.P. Wlrcphoto to The Repub- lican-Herald.) Teterboro, N. Evans and George Truman landed their two pint-sized, lOD-horsepower fliv- ver planes at Teterboro airport at a. m, (CB.T.) -today, ending a leisurely globe-circling flight unique in the history of avia- tion. The two former army pilots came in as casually as they departed from this suburban commercial air- port on August 9. They had flown around the earth In 123 days to show that it could bo done in. little fabric-covered aircraft with a cruis- ing'speed of 105 miles per hour. A flight of fighter planes escort- fleers believed the plane was New- cd the two pilots on the final lap foundland based under tho Atlantic air1 transport division command and that it probably was out of Harmon Field, near St. John's, Nfld., or Fort Peperell, Nfld. Ground. rescue units set out foi the scene at daybreak but facei rough .going over the rugged and Inaccessible country. A C-B3 transport was an route Dayton, .Ohio, thU.mornJng- a helicopter to aid In op- orationvA parachxite'physiciawtrai rushed to Labrador where will Jump if necessary to aid any pos- sible survivors. Soviet Told to Stop Taking German Assets London Secretary of State George Marshall charged tonight that Russia is taking assets from eastern Germany'at a rate of more than yearly and he de- manded that the withdrawals be halted effective January 1. Lacy, Texas Oil Tycoon, Dead Lonirvicw, Rogers B, Lacy, a fabulous Texan of a rags to riches fable, Is dead! The 03-year-old multimillionaire, in falling health, died Tuesday. Lacy, who left the life of a small town merchant to found- ed a fortune in the vast east Texas oil discovery of 1931 and expanded until he was considered one of the richest men in Texas at .the time of his death. Funeral services will be held here tomorrow. The widely known Lacy had been In ill health since September 29 when he suffered a heart attack. During his hunt for oil, associates said Lacy had uncanny luck. They said he drilled only one dry hole in more than 150 attempts. Eialleck Joins Group Demanding Aid Slash from Harrisburg, Pa., today. Evans came In first, touching the runway a few seconds ahead of Truman. The flags of 23 nations, and vari- ous insignia gathered at each of their were painted on th sides of each of the tiny planes smallest ever to cross the ocean and to circle the globe.. The pound planes (empty) had a gross maximum weight .of pounds or.430 weight. Evans, 27-year-old former army air force pilot, flew "The City o Angels" named after his native Lo Angeles. Truman, 39-year-old war tlmo flight Instructor and air trans port command pilot, made the world-girdling hop in "The City o Washington" named for his homi town of Washington, D. C. The two planes taxied side by side to the reviewing stand from which their two wives rushed out to grce them. The wives flung open the door: of the cabins and Evans and Tru- man found themselves heartily kiss, ed even before they had time to tak< off their radio gear. A crowd of several hundred which had gathered In the Icy air swarm- ed over the two planes, breaklni through police lines to greet the pilots. CHRISTMAS SFAIS Washington House Ma- ority Leader Hallcck lined up today lth other RopubllcanH demanding cut In tho administration's winter aid bill for western iurope. Cpmlng on top of reports that O.O.P. leaders in the House had agreed informally to chop the sum a the Indlanan's stand made It almost certain that the measure. would be trimmed per- haps passage. Coupled with House-approved amendments Tuesday designed to make President Truman responsible or easing the effect of relief buying n U. S. prices and supplies, any arge slash would confront a Sen- te-Houso conference committee Kith two vantly different bills. Tho Senate approved tho full ad- ministration 'request of for .France, Austria and Italy. The House foreign affairs committee cut "Debate on both sides has demon- strated a great concern over the Impact the foreign aid program may have on our domestic economy." The House approved ,-yestcrday an amendment by the foreign affairs committee which would require the President to regulate relief pur- chases in such a way as to  and on shipment of fertilizer alone, 14S to 107. French Refuse To Accept Terms Of Soviet Note Paris France ruled today ihat the terms of a Russian note protesting treatment of Soviet citi- zens in Prance and breaking off French-Russian-trade talks were un- acceptable. The French' charge d'affaires in Moscow, Pierre Chftrpentlcr, will be instructed to return the note to the Soviet government, it was announc- ed. In Moscow, a French embassy spokesman said the five members of the French repatriation mission ordered out of Russia yesterday had received their exit visas and would depart -today or tomorrow. They were expelled after the French had ordered the Russians' repatriation mission from France, charging its members with subversive activities. Russia's breaking off of the trade talks, announced yesterday by the Moscow dashed French hopes of getting tons of badly need- ed wheat. A commercial mission had been waiting in Paris for visas to go to Moscow and-complete details of a deal under which France would have supplied Russia with manufac- tured goods in exchange for the Soviet wheat, The note accused the French government of acts "hostile and con- trary to the spirit of alliance and mutual A cabinet spokesman said French actions throughout these differences with Russia had been "extremely correct." Industrial Institute Scheduled at U .of W. Mftdlson, and conditions affecting industrial pro- duction, management and mainte- nance .will be discussed in a three- day institute at the University of Wisconsin starting next Monday. The institute is one of a series presented annually by the indus- trial management institutes of the university and will be sponsored by the school of commerce, college of engineering and extension- division in cooperation with the Wisconsin Manufacturers' association. Youngdahl To Visit Scandinavia St. Paul Governor Luther W Youngdahl will take off New Year' day on a flight to Sweden, Norwa' and Denmark and a 15-day vlsl including audiences. with the king of those countries, it was leamc Tuesday. Minnesota's chief executive am his wife will go as guests of Scandi navian Airlines and its affiliates In the three countries, leaving January 1 and returning January 19 or 30. Plans Scanned The governor went over plans .yes terday with representatives-.of The countries and E. L. of thr airlines. It is expected that Young dahl will make an official announce ment of the trip within 24 hours. Tveteno returned this week from an advance tour toe the Youngdahls1 trip. He said he had found an active Interest in both the governor and Mrs. Youngdahl. In addition to- a .bond felt between the. countrlei and Minnesota's concentration o their sons, people there know tha both the governor and Mrs. Young, dahl have -Swedish- forebears Tvctene said. The trip has been In the plan- ning stage since the airline first issued the invitation to the gov- ernor last September, Tvetene said Stockholm First The Youngdahls' schedule calls for them to arrive at Stockholm January 3 for their first official ap- pearance in Sweden's capital Tve- tene said. Because of labor diffi- culties, he explained, they may first be landed at Copenhagen and proceed to Stockholm, returning to the Danish capital for MI official visit later, A short stay also is scheduled Oslo, capital of Norway, on the present schedule, before the Young- dahls return to Stockholm: In addition to being received at the courts of the three countries Youngdahl has been Invited as a special guest, at the opening of the Riksdag, Sweden's parliament, Jan- uary 13. Gates Named to Head Marines Washington President Truman today nominated Major Genera: Clifton B. Gates to be commandant of the Marine corps with.the rank of general. The nomination Is for a four year term dating from January 1, 1948, McNeil End Hunger Strike McNeil. Island Prison, island penitentiary 1 mates ended ft two day hunt strike Tuesday against food.served at the prison and Warden P. J. Squler said President Truman's pro- gram of meatless Tuesday and egg- less Thursday still would be' strict- ly followed. Announcing the end of the demon- stration by an approximate 1.018 of the federal convicts, the warden disclosed a committee of three Inmates, chosen by fellow convicts, had conferred with him on suggestions for improving the service. Woman Drowns in Washing Machine Fla. An au- topsy revealed that Mm. NeU- Swengel, 37-year-old mother of four children, drowned In a washing machine followinr a fainting spell at her home in suburban OJus. Mrs. Sweogel's body was dis- covered Tuesday by her hus- band, Oliver, who found her collapsed over the machine, her head submerged in the water and swaying with the agitators. "She evidently fainted, her head and fell Into the machine, and then she drown- said Dr. R, V. Edwards. Four-Point Plan to Get Early Action Voluntary to Hold Down Featured Washington VP) Republican congressional leaders agreed today on a four-point anti-Inflation pro- gram for enactment during present session of Congress. Senator Taft of Ohio, chairman. of the Senate Republican steering committee, and House Republican Leader Halleck of Indiana, an- nounced the program provides for: 1. Voluntary industry-wide agreements to hold living in line. Anti-trust would be met aside temporarily tor irach, agreements, -and the tratlon would be given money promote such a program. Z. Continuation and expan- sion of export controls. S. Increase, from the prawnt 35 per cenl to 40 per cent gold required behind currency Issues by federal re- serve banks; and increase from 25 to 35 per cent the gold re- serves that federal reserve banks must carry to support the de- posits of commercial banks. 4. Controls over vital trans- portation facilities, such an box- cars. The Republicans drafted their program as a reply to President Truman's request for broad powers to resume rationing and price con- trols if the administration should decide they arc necessary. A draft of a bill covering most of-the President's .requests was pre- sented by Secretary of A. W. Harrlman yesterday to a Sen- ate Judiciary subcommittee, but Re- publicans have made clear that measure will get nowhere. Democrats Attack Even before the Republican pro- gram was offlclaUy announced. It had come under attack from Demo- crats. Representative Gore CD.- Tenn.) accused the G.O.P. of "rub- ber stamping" for "big business" by proposing voluntary agreements. Taft said a single bill embodying all four points of the Republican 51 will be- introduced in touse _ Wolbott (R.-MJch.) of the btnklnc committee. _ Wolcott told reporters he hold hearings on the bin to- morrow and said they should not last more than one day. Taft and Hollcck announced plan following a meeting of Scnata and House G.O.P. leaders In UM office of Speaker Joseph Martin. They said they that the slngls) be enacted in time to per- mit Congress to adjourn Decem- ber 10. About the time the meeting- breaking up on the Bouse side of the Capitol, the Senate banldnc committee approved one point of the President's anti-Inflation pro- to restore limited consumer credit controls through, March 15, 1949. Chairman Tobcy (R.-N. H.) told reporters the vote was nine to four. The bill approved by the commit- tee simply authorized federal reserve board to restore controls on Installment buying. This regular charge accounts from any restriction. HnJJeck, talking with after the meeting in Martin's office, emphasized that the program, that croup decided on is the ides, of thsi lepubllcan leadership and that rank and file members are not necessarily committed to It. Single Appropriation Urced The leadership also agreed that single appropriation bill should >e whipped together providing funds for emergency foreign relief, oc- cupation needs of the army, and for administration of the anti-Inflation irogram. Taft said the subject of consumer credit controls will be handled sep- arately "if at but indicated that no action is likely at this ses- sion. That statement did not close the door, from the standpoint of the eadershlp, against action on measure approved by the committee. The House will consider both ipproprlntlon and the economic illls first, Hallack sold. Attending the conference besides Hallcck, Martin and Tart were Sen- .tors Cooper of Kentucky and Wiley of Wisconsin and Represent- itlvcs Taber of New York, Michener of Michigan, Arends of Illinois. Brown of Ohio and Wigglesworth, of Massachusetts. Hallcck said no further of the leaders are planned. Taft had told a reporter it Is hia >crsonal inclination to plgconhola he measure sent to Capitol TTIII Tuesday by Secretary of Commerce Harriman. Harriman's bill proposes broad which Under Secretary Wil- lam C. Foster- said would permit the rationing of meat, gasoline and Jthcr commodities. The measure would provide au- thority for allocations and priorities n scarce items, including livestock ind poultry, steel, grain and grain products, freight cars and other ommodltlcs. Official Quits Panama Foreign Minister licardo J. Alfaro, resigned from the government lost night because f his opposition to a proposed grcemcnt under which Panama ould lease 13 defense bases to the United States.   

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