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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: December 2, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 2, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER w INONA Need! a Clrio Auditorium Full LwMd Newt Report of The Associated Preit Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO. 243 WINONA. MINNESOTA. TUESDAY EVENING. DECEMBER 2. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Many Children Need Good Fellows Again This Year ANTA GLAUS will come to tho homos of all needy children In Wlnona again this Christmas. Back of this declaration la the annual performance of the Good Follows organization since 1912 Ejich ycfir, this voluntary organization, com- posed of Good Follows In Wlnona and tho sur rounding area, has brought tho Joys of Christ mns to tho homos of the needy In, this com munlty. Although employment runs high In Wi norm thl.i Chdiitmas season and to many the prcfwnt time Is tho golden era, with prosperity reigning miprcmo, surveys made during tho Jasl two weeks rovcul that there Is a very definite _ need for the Good Fellows again this year. Tho sun not shlnp on every home. Reports of welfare agencies charities chnck.t mndo In tho city schools show that Illness Ju.-t plain hard luck have left tho usual number o  48 KIYT.K lltll.I.I'.TIN KldOd HtllKO 2'l-llr, Today Change i wine 14 ,i- ri.O I MIIII -1. T.W fi, T.W ti.iin TiA, T.W u iC.'.IM 1 (i, 1'iHil I nun 'I'.W Dukdtii iC.I'.i Diuii 7, Tool T.W Lu 13 12 '1.0 2.0 3.2 .1.3 fl.H 4.1 7.1 0.3 ,1.0 4.0 ,1 Tributary lit Dnrund 4.B 2.0 2.8 2.4 3.8 lit, Thdltmiin. llii.Tiilo ulxjvr Alma... Tn-iriprftli'iiu nt Dodge lilnck at Ctnlr.ivlllo Crosso nt Salom 1.0 Houston C.7 UIVKIt FORECAST (Kroni HiullnRM to Olitlenberr, IOWH) Only Might rliios of about .1 of foot will occur nt all tallwator In this district with tho cx- rrptlon of iiiim 5-A which will bo ni-iirly Mutlomiry clurlnif tho next 24 or bring their contrl- llittd. Welfare under direction of Light foot will make' the purchases and arrange tor distribution of tho gifts uddremed to Santa Clau.s will be Investigated by the Good with the aid of teachers welfare agencies Individual lowing tablo: .1021 11.401.00 ]922 IBM 721.01 JB24.................. 75D.3S 10SS HO 1.60 inifi O.'IH.BO 1D27 1028 1D21) 1P30 1ICI1 1532 1033 1034 J03S.................. 1B37 1040 2.077.74 1042.................. 1.B61.82 1044 1045 1047 t Be a Good Fellow Following Is n list of to tho Ooocl Fellows fund to ctato: Reserve ftiml Wlnona Atheltlo club A friend 1.00 Auto Crushes Boy Near Rochester RMhimUr Molvln Adlor, 18, son of Mr. and Hllbort Adlcr of llaverhlll township, throo from hero, was killed when ho was arunhod between tho nuto body and door after n car he was driving back and forth to adjust ntruck R trco. U. S. Has New Atom Weapons Arabs Stage Riot In Jerusalem British Troops Aid Police; Scores Wounded By Carter L. Davidson Jerusalem Thousands of Arabs, venting their anger at the Impending division of Palestine stormed through the .streets of Jeru- salem wrecking and shooting before police and troops restored semblance of order this afternoon. Jews counterattacked in bloody fighting. Rioting broko out at other points In the Holy Land, and the casual ty toll in mid-afternoon by un official count reached four Jews dead, 29 Jews wounded and nine Arabs injured. Mobs put the torch to 50 build ings in Jerusalem, both Jewish and Arab, Jewish sources estimated the property damage at more than Armored cars nnd Bren gun car- riers wore called into play by Brit- ish authorities to disperse the riot- ers. Tho British were assisted by thousands of khnki-clnd young Jews ipparcntly members of Hagana Traffic Halted Bagdad Traffic In the main streets of Bnifdad wns brought to a standstill today and buslnewi was virtually para- lysed as Iraq demonstrator! continued (or second day to display their opposition to the Impending partition of Pales- tine. self-styled Jewish defense who assembled in mldtown Zlon square. Jewish volunteers distin- guished by blue arm direct- ed traffic around congested areas. Six Shops Ignited Police estimated that as many as Arabs had stormed out of the old city of Jerusalem and- headed for the Jewish quarter, A roadblock manned by tommy- howling mob back on mldtown Princess Mary's wny, but the rioters swept into St, Julian's way, 100 yards from the King David hotel and started smashing windows and overturning automobiles. Pollco nrmorocl cars edged into the mob, Hrlng Bron guns, and fire pa- trols began fighting the raging flrcH. One group -pf Arabs, crying out 'filthy hurled nlones ut tho automobile in which this cor- respondent was riding, but failed to connect with their target. Gunfire Breaks Out Ounnro broko out near the U. 8. consulate in Mamlllah road. tanooiiHly In other parts oC, Palos- ilne. Tho Ktonlnrt ot Jewish buses iontlnuocl In Tel Aviv, and a bomb- L Jng occurred in a suburb of that all- L Jewish casualties, In London, n British government lourco said It la "safe to assume" Britain would authorize at least a admits Jews a month into Pal- estine. Hastings Bridge Designer Dead at 84 Minneapolis Funeral nurv- ccn being arranged today for Lawrunco H. Johrmon, 84, former of tho state ICRlslator and tamed Hastings spiral was credited with other spans durlnK his presi- dency of the Honncpln Bridge Com- pany, from which ho retired in 1932. Ho was speaker of the house in 1007. 74 Drown in Storm at Sea Off Portugal IJnbon, Portugal Din- patohci from Porton said today that 174 fishermen and uailori wero believed drowned In the wont dtorm cxporlcnond mnilnrn timed olT that count. Scores of fkhlnr bonti were caught last nfght In the storm, which WM continuing today. Bodlefl were bcln< washed ashore. Port authorities life- boat rescue crews. One of the casualties was the smack Dom Manuel Segundo, which sunk with 35 aboard. French Filibuster Of Communist Deputies Broken Paris A ten-hour "silent filibuster" by communist deputies was broken early today and the na- tional assembly was called back In- to session to enact a stringent anti- strike law requested by Premier Robert Schuman to fight work stop- page paralysing the nation. One stoppage was ended this morning when police cleared sit- down strikers from six power plants in the Paris area, permitting sub- ways to resume operation after serv- ice had been suspended for several hours. More than workers remained Idle, however, every major industry. stalling The communists' "silent filibuster" against Schuman's antlstrlke bill, which is aimed at breaking the com- munist grip on the French labor movement, ended when Republican guards ejected Communist Deputy Raoul Cains from the assembly Aid Passes Senate, Faces Cut in House Representatives' Reduced Measure Has China Grant By William F. Arbojrast Over the hump of Senate approval, the administra- tion's stop-gap Euro- pean aid bill faced potent House demands today that it be pared by some The "measure cleared the Senate by an 83 to C vote late Monday in substantially the form asked by President Truman two weeks earlier, but it still has a rocky road ahead. Even the Sennte version is S7r- more than the House for- eign affairs committee has recom- mended. And the House group's total includes for China which the Senate measure did not Include. "Our fight will be to take out the for said a high House Republican who de- clined to permit the use of his name. "Even the President did not request emergency aid for China ant! the Senate provided for as- sistance only to Italy, France and Austria." Leadership Divided However, the G.O.P. leadership Is split on the Chinese question. Speaker Martin (R.-Mass.) said yesterday he favors giving some help to China immediately. But Republicans were virtually unanimous in their insistence that the stop-gap bill contain tv provision, not Jn the Senate measure, stating that the Congress is not commitlng chamber. Fifty Follow Fifty other communist deputies who had occupied the otherwise empty chamber with Colas followed him out. There was no disorder. refused to leave the speak- jostrum Monday .afternoon aft- er a vote of consuro against him for urging army reservists to refuse to comply with government orders call- ing them to the colors. The vote also directed his temporary expulsion from tho assembly. Tho tumult in tho chamber over tho incident became so great that Assembly President Edouard Hcr- Dili uM "J and other communist deputies oc- cupied tho chamber through the night. Full Show Made Tho guards made full show of force In ejecting Cnlas. A guard Jerusalem hospital reported that olonel armed with a letter from Aviv Hebrew newspaper Hanrotz. He sicic. Two hundred more, helmeted for conl, lor was said to havo been stoned and anci armcd with rifles, were at other petroleum, for fertilizer as naici LO navo uuuii awnvu and armed Wltn rules, were at ouicr petroleum, for fertilizer ully beaten. points In tho building and 300 oth- mld Ouier ngrlculturnl supplies, wore roportrd Klmul- nrs wcrc olli.sldc. for medlcn) supplies, and ir.s were UUU.UUU lor meaiuni Calas a I; first said he would not for cotton. uavc cxcopt "by but when xhe State dcpurtm leave ,he colonel made the regulation nnd walkcd slowly out Of- the snowed after a few mo- thc othor ln. George Slater Of shows off his Minnesota No. 1 gilt a new breed of hog which was shown for the first time nt the International Livestock exposition under way this week at Chicago, ni The breed was developed at the University of Minnesota under the direction of Dr. L. M. Winters. Slater's hog weighs 280 pounds. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The that the Congress is not commiung Washington American military ooauivi.-ia WM-J. mmt 'ducpd from uranlum. itself to continued foreign nld, to tne danger that a "holy war" In Palestine may bring red army shQWcd the engineers Many Republicans, including some ]nto the country ostensibly to protest the new Jewish state plece or uranium metal. of the top members, believe that Arabs a few years ago there W S Mediterranean not this much uranium met cemuoermd uropean recovery c sharply from current estimates within flying minutes of the Suez ikin dis- ranging up to ngng up o The whole issue of foreign tance of American oil concessions in both short nnd long was Saudi Arabia. due to be reviewed at a conference of the 245 House Republicans later today. The Senate beat down every ma- jor amendment before sending the emergency bill to lha House; By 'a 50 to 30 vote last wek it rejected move to sut the over-all author- to Dill Maximum Tho six "no" voLon on final wero cast by Senators Limner (R.-N. McKcllnr Mooro O'Dnnlcl (D.- Aascmbly President Edouard Her- (R.-Wyo.) and riot was forced to suspend tho ses- Hon. Culas Htayod on the rostrum lt stll'nds noWi the merely tvtrl Vim' nntvimi inlKr. rlnrtllr.iP't _. __ flxes a top limit on the amount of help that can be provided through next March 31 for Italy, France and Austria. It Is avowedly aimed at hailing ;he spread of communism in Eur- wardlng off cold and hunger has siild that would be used for Lne coionci mtiue mt luKuiunmt tnac WOUJQ ue usuu AUJ. three requests to Cnlas to go with Austria, for Italy and H-ii, n.ssnnt- nnn nnn fnv "Pi-annp assent- for Thi 1 ni uricain wouiu auttiouw uu ments by tnc othor deputies, in- 50 per cent Increase in the rate of cludlnK communist Leaders i Mau-1 Talk in Georgia legal Jewish Immigration Intoi Pal- Jacques Duclos andi Atlanta Harold Aaf Inu n ntlfl 1. _. I HA 1 j UU liUiUOi wu.a .v..w j---- jn.U.4 UHJ Cfltlna between now ana AURiihi i, Mftriy. ilmd a Kpcaking engagement in Col- would bring, from Moscow, the of- whon British troops nro scheduled Thc Schuman antlstrlko bill, Iurnbus, Ohio, today In his campaign rcr to station Russian troops in to lonvo the Holy I4ina. Britain nov, t, Communist deputies are. fnr the RcnuWican nresldential Palestine. power for three months ,o find and Jail nlrlku oKllators, and to apply doubly stiff penalties for sabotage. Child Bean in Windpipe ui u..u Dickinson, N. Lor- famoa wastings spiral bridge. He. raino, two nnd one-half-ycar-old was credited with having built some daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur '7 _____, Ti.i.Vrtln fllftrl 1n wnicn line uammumab uupuuiua "iuijor cue A-ccpuuJicnn fighting so bitterly, would give the nomination, but planned to return rrtuoi'timnnt: nnwnr fnr i.hrno inonths Inmni-rnw fni' flll'UlCM' confer- 'Holy War9 Could Draw Soviet Troops to Palestine By Bclman Morin Washington American military observers pointed today Arabs .ny a ew years The move would put Russian troops on the Mediterranean, not this much a uranium canal, and within easy striking dis The possibility that Russia will offer to intervene is being freely discussed in Washington today. Move Expected A highly-placed officer, who could not be quoted, said, "It can be ex- pected within 90 days, if real fight- ing breaks out In Palestine. It wil bo very cmbarr.issing for both the British and ourselves." Thorn in no Joint United Nations military force yet organized to maintain order anywhere in the world. Britain has announced her inten- tion to withdraw her army, estimat- ed now at men, from Pales- tine before next August. Fighting in Palestine might set the whole Middle East aflame. tl. S. Has No Troops There The United States has no troops Is bcinu expressed in the area. Some hope here thnt the Jews will be strong enough to protect themselves. The little state numbers slightly more than in population. It is surrounded by more than Arabs. However, none of the Arab nations has a trained army, equipped with modern weapons. The Jews can put into the field at least one regular army unit, and thousands of tough, experienced guerrilla fighters. But American observers believe that oven a large-scale guerrilla Stnsscn struggle between Arabs and Jews Jr.. 14. saw :-Iestukln of Buffalo Springs, tiled a hospital hero Monday before Dick- inson physicians could dislodge a benn stuck In her windpipe. hen; tomorrow for further confer CIICL-K with Cinoi'Kia Republicans. Upon his return, the former Min- nesota governor will speak at a Junior Chamber oC Commerce luncheon his third address h Georgia in three days. He appeared Monday at a civic club luncheon and last night before an audience of at Emory university. At Emory he urged openness In diplomatic procedure and called the Tuft-Hartley law excellent foundation for a new national labo; policy." A Western Pacific locomotive lies on its side, steam escaping from broken pipes alter collision with a parked freight train near Stockton, Calif., In a heavy fog. A box car, caboose and other cars were splin- torcd by the tapact and three crewmen wero slightly Injured. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republican-Herald.) ert M. Hutchins of the University memoraUng Mia fifth anniversary of the first self-sustaining chain reaction. from an atomic pile In a converted squash court beneath the stands of Stagg field on the University of Chi- cago campus, occurred on December 2, 1942. Ex-Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska Succumbs W. Johnson, 65, ieutenant governor of Nebraska from 1040 to 1940, died today of a icai-t ailment in his Sherman hotel room. 5 His widow. lone, 60, told police he had been suffering from heart trou- ble. The Johnson, home is in Kear- ney, Neb. Legion Club at Minneapolis Robbed Minneapolis Burglars who climbed a rear fire escape and forced open a door stole about :rom the cash register and more ,han from five pinball ma- chines In the American Legion club rooms, last night. the frantic barking of a two-year- data." What KOOS on there, tlie commls- said. Is expected to result In garage advances In "peaceful ns well as In old collie dog, 22 persons fled to jj.om tno ncarcst large land safety early today as fire -urcad n closcd-off proving srounds through thc building in which they for on '.'new fundamental had been sleeping. Assistant Fire Chief Dan Slrmon said tho fire destroyed a garage and an apartment building In which military applications of atomic en- 14 Negroes were sleeping, and crKy' spread to a house occupied by a white family. 'Mrs. Victoria Corey, one of thc eight white persons in the house, said she was awakened about 3 a, m. by the barklixg of Princess, a collie belonging to James Norris. Lilienthal Reports on Production Eniwetok, Pacific Atoll, Readied for Proving Ground Atlantic City, N. S. Lilienthal, chairman or the Atomla Energy commission, disclosed today the trailed States now Is producing new atomic weapons from both ura- liium and plutonium. "Both of these products are used for atomic weapons In current pro- duction and under design at com- mission Lilienthal said. He did not explain whether the new weapons are bombs, as were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or represent a hew mill- tan' application of atomic power. Such details are classed as "secret." In a speech prepared for American Society of Mechanical En- gineers, Lilienthal said the weap- ons are being assembled at the Iso- lated Los Alamos, N. labora- tories where the first bomb was pro- duced. Proving Created Yesterday the Atomic Energy com- mission disclosed a new proving grounds for atomic weapons is be- ing created nt remote Enlwctok atoll, in the far Pacific. The government never has con- firmed any reports concerning nature of the contents of atomic bombs which have been exploded In the past. But it is known, they can be made either of uranium 235 or of plutonium, a man-made ele- ment produced from uranium. Dog's Barking Saves 22 From Fire in Mobile Mobile, Aroused by Atomic Energy commission dlsclos- the world; today we use it by he said. He said the nation has spent about in the atomia enterprise. "If this country really means busi- ness then within the next several years this total expenditure will In- crease to approximately ho-added. The terse announcement from I., Asked whether a reference to 'atomic weapons" means that country's arsenal now includes a nuclear fission running mate for tho atom bomb, one offlclnl replied: "You can draw your own conclu- sions." Full Security Unlike the surface and undcr- I water atom tests at Bikini looked out the window and 'atoll in the summer of 1946, which flames shooting toward the wero covered by several hundred reporters nnd foreign observers, the she said. ....v. Mrs. Corey said she spread the "cw experiments will be under .u 1 alarm and summoned firemen. Wiley Proposes Decentralization For Defense By Richard P. rowers Washington The United might come in on a tem- porary experts said, "and then you'd never get them out." CanVikvTWar And Civilization, Hutchins Says _____...... Chicago Chancellor Rob- worse than the previous catastrophe. j.._ T7Un.jH7.lncr t.Vln nnssibilitv that States might lose n. future war "in a matter of minutes" due to the atom bomb unless government and ndustry ore decentralized. Senator Alexander Wiley (R.-Wis.) said to- day. "We Wiley told a reporter, 'halt and reverse the crazy, suicidal toward centralization which is simply Inviting another horrible Pearl Harbor a thousand times Visualizing' the possibility that ert M. Hutchins of the nversy viou.im.in6 of ChicnKO declared today that "Any Congress could be virtually wiped policy which is based on the as- out .in an atomic war, Wiley said he sumption that there can be another expects to introduce later this week war Is obsolete." a constitutional amendment which "We cannot have war nnd clvilJza- would Permlt governors of the states tlon too Hutchins said In an ad- to appoint members to tho House In drew prcparod for a luncheon com- of vacancies, He said he has written to Qover- mil y muu mto w w T u. atomic nor Oscar Rcnncbohm of Wiscon- ...______ sin asking his consideration of initi- The first such reaction, developed ating a change in the Wisconsin statutes to permit Interim appoint- ment of a senator in thc event of n vacancy. Wiley also wrote to Secretary of Defense Forrestal to urge him "to initiate" with his colleagues In tho cabinet "immediate decentralization from our capital, particularly of vital military establishments." "The Soviet Wiley Wrote Forrestal, "has decentralized to a tremendous extent and presents a far less vulnerable target to Mos- cow than we do in Washington." Twin Lakes, Wis., Boy Killed by Truck security lost announcement Bald. The area will be shut off from thc world and the Security council of the United Nations will be noti- fied to this effect, as provided In, the U.N. trusteeship agreement for the former Japanese-mandated Is- lands. The 145 native Inhabitants of atoll islands of Aomon and Blijlrl will leave for a permanent new home which they will select. Bikini wns unsuitable for the now experiments, the commission said. because It lacked land enough to contain "the instrumenta- tion necessary to the scientific ob- servations which must be made." Between Hawaii, Eniwetok itself has only about two and one-fourth square miles of land. One big reason for choosinj? it, the announcement explained, is its isolation. There are hundreds of miles of open seas "in the di- rection In which winds might carry radioactive It lies about halfway between Hawaii and the Philippines, and the clbscst big land area Is New Guinea, miles to thc southwest. Senator Bricn McMohon (D.- a member of thc Scnate- Houso atomic committee nnd au- thor of tho atomic energy act, told reporters: "The start on construction is the natural, reasonable development of atomic energy in view of world con- ditions today and the refusal of thc Russians to accept a good plan for control." The commission advised Congress last July that it wns establishing a Pacific proving grounds for "rou- tine experiments and tests of atomic weapons." Over Deer Killed in Wisconsin Madison, estimated army of hunters killed In, excess of legal deer during the nine-day hunting season which, ended Sunday, the state conserva- tion department reported today. Otis Bersing of thc cooperativa j Otis Bersing or tnc cooperaava Twin Wis. Five- game management section said a. Gerald Kinncy was killed 24-point buck that weighed 210 instantly Monday when a village pounds dressed was the biggest to garbage truck backed over him near be reported to the department thus Ills home. The truck driver told au- for. The animal, with an antler thoritles Gerald and another lad spread that measured 24 Vi Inches, were playing near the truck and ig- was killed November 25 by George uored his warnings to stay away. Bierstaker of Pcmbtac. Bierstaker The youth was the son of Mr. and did not Indicate where toe killed Mrs. Kenneth H. Klnney. buck.   

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