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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, November 29, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 29, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                EATHER w INONA Need! a Auditorium Full News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulati VOLUME 47. NO. 241 W1NONA. MINNESOTA. SATURDAY EVENING. NOVEMBER 29. 1047 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Towb Icebound A Premier Assails Communists Demands Revision of French Against Sabotage Robert Bchu man wOtrcl thn nntlonul nwcmbly todny for power to crnok down on for striken or sabotage "by writing or He drxlct ho wnntocl this right lor tlmo nn ho ploadod for powfr to holp him fight ft strang- ling wnvr of communlnt-lnnplrcd utrlXM throughout ITnnoo. The cc-mmlttoo on rlvl and criminal law immediately up provrd tho government bills, 30 to 13, nnd wnt them to tho nwombly, which la expected to consider thorn Inter In the tiny. Approval would give the govern- ment weapon iigdlnut newspapers encouraging the utrlken, whloh have made more than French workers Idle. Government found guilty of, "nKltixtlon" would bo dismissed under the measures. Key Industries, Including eleotrlo power, railroads and wire are na- HowiUwd and their work for tho government, Tho wOtod by Sohumnn would run from tomorrow until May 31. Revision In demanding "complete revision' of the on sabotage, he took cognizance of that sabotage on increase and declwed: "If we htivB reached point, tho reitponnlbtllty to the directly to the commu- rdltT Id the1 'aMerhbly, 'the new premier, beginning his iwoona week in office. charged! "I declare thai your goal Is to excitement in thp oowntry. it u agftlwt that tne govern- ment contend." ito wild the trouble WM belni caused moro rind moro by foreign Protentit roarort from the commurUia benches. As Schuman spoke, more than a third of the nation's or- ganized workers wore on strike and uovernment forces woro ejecting from rail centers and other they had seized. Bchuman nlso asked trie assembly to reorganize Pftrt of tho Trench jwcurlty and to paw a now law giving added protection to non- strtkers. The security forces whoso re- organization wan nsketl by Sohuman were the republican security com- to tho O. 8, na- tional which wide- spread sympathy for tho hns been reported. Whole com- panies already have boon disband- ed on this ground. Communists Attacked It WM learned that the approxi- mately 80.000 soldiers, half tho class of 1948, called up yesterday would be under orders of tho ministry of interior, which controls tho police and not of tho ministry of armed forces, as customary. Schuman attacked the commu- nists ftfwln and again. When, Just before a rccrns was taken, Assembly President JWouard llcrrlot said tho debate would bo resumed after- noon, Communist Deputy Arthur lUmettc crlod out: "They're In a hurry. They're thirsty for In the course of his speech Schu man also wild It would bo necessary to take "measures of but he did not explain what ho had in mind. Earlier, some sources said the cabinet wanted power to re- quisition or conscript workers. Communist Labor Chief Bcnott Franchon published In tho commu- nist newspaper L'Humtvnlte today KD appeal to "tho whole of the non- strtklnK population" to "come to the aid of those who arc fltfhling." There wrre broad hints from other of plans for a general strike Tor Monday. At. Ht. Ktlrnnc. six of republican security companies (Na- tional (ruord) moved in on the rail- road depot and cleared tho station and platform of strikers. The strik- ers retreated but some woro re- ported holding out In tho round- house. In Paris, police cleared tvll tho seven main railway torml- rxcept tho Lyon station, where strikers remained. Previously, In some passengers had to bo curried by bus to out-of-town sta- tions to board tho few trains still running. HkboUxff KeporiMl Some scattered sabotage was re- ported. At La villoto, and Avosnos "runaway" locomotives roared down the tracks with throttles open, tolescopInK two freljtht cars In one case. At Nanterro and Vanvos, overhead high tension cables woro short circuited. At Lyon, a locomotive derailment crushed ten frc-lKht cars Just before an express was duo to pass and at Brest an express from Paris was wived whon rails wcro discovered ripped loose. Republican-Herald Circulation TODS for Mew Record For the flrit time In the ea-yonr-old history of Tho Republican-Herald, the net paid circu- lation of this newspaper hns exceeded This new high was reached with the distri- bution of Friday'! and is the largest net paid dally circulation of any newspaper In the state 'of Minnesota outside of the Twin Cities and Duluth. The figure Includes newspapers in the city of a new all-time and in the Winona trade area Imme- diately surrounding the city. Nino hundred and sixty-six copies sold by mall outside of the trade area. The growth of The Republican-Herald cir- culation through the years has been a steady and continuous one. In 1827 it was and ton yours ago, In 1087, it was The growth in tho last ten years haa steadily pushed the figure upward until the mark was ex- ceeded for the first time last evening. .This growth has been attained In part by use of modern transportation methods and ex- panded carrier delivery service. Today The Re- publican-Herald is delivered directly to homes in 34 communities in the Winona trade area before the dinner hour. Sixty-three Republi- can-Herald carriers, each a little merchant in business for himself, deliver in these cltloa and villages. In Winona 53 carriers de- liver copies, Republlcan-Herald-operated trucks and au- tomobiles cover 350 miles each publication day getting this newspaper to the boys on time, Bus lines, trains, and star routes are used each day to speed The Republican-Herald on Its way. Rural carriers and postal employes de- liver another to subscribers through the Winona area. Tho figure continues to maintain Tho Republican-Herald's leadership among Northwest newspapers in circulation. Only the dallies In the metropolitan cities of Minneapo- lis, St. Paul and Duluth exceed Its circulation in Minnesota. This figure is more than that of tho Rochester Post-Bulletin, and more than the St. Cloud Dally Times, the two other second class cities of this state. It is more than the combined circulation of the Austin Herald and Albert Lea Tribune and more than the Mankato Free Press. Few cities of the United States In the to class have a dally newspaper with a greater circulation volume. Another unusual fact about The Republi- can-Herald's circulation Is that two-thirds of it, 84 per cent Is outside of the city of Winona, distributed, in cities, villages and to farms- in Winona trade area. Colombia Asks U.N. Defer Action on Palestine Issue By Max Hamilton New York The bitter fight over the "Soviet-American" plan to partition Palestine was ipllt wide open today as a result of iurprln move of Friday to defer final United Na- tions action until next As the United aaiembly was called back Into session Data On Inflation Controls Sought By------- Washington BenaU Re- publicans demanded today that the Truman administration "get speci- fic" about the anti-Inflation powers It wants from Congress. Senator Taft chair- man of the Senate-House economic committee, told a reporter he Is opposed to writing any blank check legislation setting up power, for example, to earmark scarce ma- terials for essential uses. But the Ohioan he might bo willing to have possibly ten par cent of the steel production set aside for priority requirements, such an box cars. 'Would Stretch Taft expressed tho opinion that tho administration would stretch any general authority to allocate to cover more ground than Con- gress would do so "very promptly." Senator Wfttklns a member of tho joint committee, said It Is tlmo for the administra- tion to "got specific" about plans to carry out President Truman's ton-point of living program, Wutklns pronsed Secretary of Commerce A. W. Harrlman for de- tulls on allocation of steel when ho appeared before tho committee Friday, "All I got for an Watklns snld. "was some generalized state- ment about stool being needed for box cars" Reiume Monday On another point of Mr. Tru- man's program, Taft said today ho is not averse to broadening export controls and .might even support legislation which would give tho Commerce department the right to deny export licenses In cases where cxcoHfilvo prices are being charged for Items shipped abroad, Tho economic committee will re- Kimio hearings Monday on the cost of living program, with Interior officials slated to deal with alloca- tion of fuel oil and ponslbly gasoline and coal. Also on Monday, the Senate banking committee will reopen Its Inquiry Into whether consumer Dr. Alfonso was fe- ported to lined up port> tno Arfti3-lcd nnti- partltlonlsts, for his plan of defer- ment. The Arab countries mot secretly Imt night, One informed nourcc n1 attitude to the bank crodlt. Loss in Fire in Louisville LoulivllK, spectacular flro raged for hours during the night In the three-story brick Bos- ton building In the heart of down- town Louisville before being brought under control early today. A dozen firemen woro Injured or ovorcomo by billowing smoke which spread for blocks In the business noctlon. Hundreds of spectators packed tho fire gceno, only a few doors north of a. busy -Intersection. Tho property loss was expected to amount to at iMUt their own account. Mjiy co ipjji, WM taken us evidence of an move by the Arabs to be more open to conciliation. Hereto- demand for a single independent Arabic nation In the Holy Land. Tho Colombian proposal for de- lay was laid before tho assembly late Friday at Flushing Meadow Park when most delegates thought they wero finally at tho point of voting on the partition plan. As- sembly President Oswaldo Aranha of Brazil already had predicted semi -privately that partition would be approved. Action on- both- tho Colombian proposal and the partition plan was then sidetracked when the assem- bly approved n surprise French mo- tion for a 24-hour recess so that a final effort at conciliation could be made between Arab antipartitlon- Ists and Zionists favoring a pat- torn for tho Holy Land that would establish Jowldh and Arab nations. Affect Uncertain Just how seriously the problem was complicated by tho Colombian move could not be ascertained im- mediately. Chief U. S. Delegate Warren R. Austin said It would not diminish the chanoes of the par- tition plan being accepted. One high U.N. official, on tho other hand, expressed a belief that the .move had killed all chances of partition being approved at this assembly session, which has been running since September 16. Meanwhile Informed quarters re ported Iran and Afghanistan, two of tho antipartltlonist countries sup- porting tho Arab position, had ask- od tho Arab country delegations to turn to a fodoralincd government for Talestlne ns a possible compro- mise. This plan was recommended last summer by an Indlan-Yugo- Mav-Iranlan 'minority on tho 11- mombcr United Nations special committee on Palestine but was dropped without n test. Some countries which had reluct- antly committed themselves to sup- Man Killed in Auto Crash Near Redwood Falls Kedwood FallH, Minn. One Minneapolis man was killed and four other persons wero Injured, three seriously, when their automo- bile crashed into a concrete bridge abutmohtf'brriJignVrtcy !10' 'fivo-mlles east of Redwood Falls early today. Tho doad man was Leonard Eric Ol-son. Ho suffered a broken neck. Taken to a Redwood Falls hospital In serious condition were Mrs. Ol- son, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Manley, believed to be from Minneapolis, and Margaret Landers of Morton. Olson's wife suffered n. broken leg. Dr. W, A. Brand, Redwood coun- ty coroner said he believed the ac- cident occurred about a, m, Tho car was driven by Manley, the coroner said. Big Carry-Over Of Old Wheat Crop Opposed Washlnuton Any move by Congress to retain a large amount of wheat In this country as a carry- over to the new crop year "would serve to greatly deflate wheat Senator Young (R.-N. D.) said today. "While I believe it is essential to carry over an adequate supply of wheat each year to Insure a plenti- ful supply for the United States, too big a carry-over would make Jt impossible for us to furnish the nec- essary food so desperately needed for Europe and all the rest of the Young told a reporter. "It also would certainly deflate wheat prlcQH and would bo a bad practice to get Into from a wheat production angle. "Wheat producers have been plagued by tremendous carry-overs In the years past when foreign mar- kets were not available. These very surpluses made it necessary for years to have wheat acreage reduction programs." Walda Winchell Back Home New York E. Win- chell, 20-year-old daughter of Wal- ter Winchell, who had been -the object of a wide police search since she was reported missing Wednes- day, was back home today, Ernest Cuneo, attorney for the Winchell family, announced. Cuneo, who asked the missing persons bureau of the police de- partment to cancel the alarm for Miss Winchell, said she had been "visiting friends" and was "back home again." He did not elaborate. Attend Army-Navy Game Municipal Stadium, Flillndclphlu Truman, the na- tion's No. 1 football fan, took his seat today to Join with oth- ers in watching the 48th meeting be- tween Army and Navy. The President and his party oc- cupied a 144-chalr box at midfield in front of the west stands. The President flipped a newly minted coin to decide goals. Navy won President Truman's toss and Army kicked off. The score by quarters: Army Navy Senator Taft Supports Stop-Gap Aid Ohioan Criticizes Program for Long-Range Help Washlnifton Senator Ro- bert Tart (R.-Ohlo) threw his support today behind the 000 winter aid bill for western Eur- ope but served notice that he Is against nny Jong range attempt at "underwriting the world's deficits" with dollars. He told a reporter the winter aid bill, limited to food, fuel ar.d fer- tilizer for France, Italy and Austria, la all right because it will "help those countries go to He predicted tho Senate will approve the measure next week after Its Saturday-Sunday recess. But tho Ohioan, who Is chairman of the Senate O.O.P. policy com- mittee and an announced candidate for his party's presidential nomi- nation, said he opposes what lie called a Stato department policy of trying to "solve the financial difficulties of every government.'1 Marshall Plan Not Mentioned Without mentioning the Marshall plan by name, he said no such policy should bo carried forward Into a long-range program for Europe. Under the Marshall plan, 16 Eur- opean nations would receive to of as- sistance irom this country to en- courage them In a program of self- help by mutual cooperation. It Is expected to reach Congress about December 8. As an example of what lie objects to, Taft cited In a Senate speech Friday a recent advance of funds by this country to France .which he said was used partly to pay French debts of and Balance of Payment! Tnft declared tho 'State dopart- inunt apparently has adopted a "balance of payments" policy under wliich It says to western European nations: 'Fl.gure out everything you want to import and what you can export. Wo will criticize your figures to some extent and perhaps scale them down a little but we will advance you the difference.'" Taft said "I believe we have to go on and on with assistance to Europe but I think it should bo carclully scrutinized. We should determine the tilings which we are willing to ship and confine them to the things which we think would help those countries to go to work, rather than simply to solve the financial dif- ficulties of every government." 50 Flee Fire in Pennsylvania Coatesvlllc, Pa. W) One of iCoatesvllle's worst fires early today swept the 75-year-old Grand hotel building in the heart of the business district, routing approximately 50 guests and causing damage estimat- ed at Flames, smoke and water dam- aged tho adjoining Trunk building and for a time threatened the whole row of business houses on Lincoln hlpthway. Thousands of dollars worth of ChrlNlmas murchandl.se was destroy- ed In the W. Woolworth and J. J. Newberry stores which occupied the first floor of the three-story hotel I building. Duluth Boy Hurt in Toboggan Accident Duluth, Minn Suffering a possible skull fracture when a tobog- gan struck a tree at Chester Park bowl, Lloyd Sussman, 1C, Minne- apolis, was In a local hospital where he was said to be in "good" condi- tion Business District Christmas Fairyland As Lights Go On While a light fluffy snow fell of the real Christ- mas downtown streets burst Into gay colors at dusk Friday evening. The Yuletidc lights, erected annually by the merchants, gJowed like stars along Third street for the first time, and the city's 1947 Christmas shop- ping season was under way. Throngs of early shoppers were on the streets enjoying the Ini- tial official .day. The lighted Christmas dec- orations, extending from John- son to Kansas streets on Third, will glow each evening from about o'clock to 11 o'clock Into the New of the Yuletido festivities. As in previous years, electric power for the 24 evergreen fes- toons, Is donated by the Missis- sippi Valley Public Sen-Ice com- For shoppers the gift selec- tion Is better than ever. Parents will be happy to know that the quality of the toys is better, metal and plastic toys being back In quantity. Electric trains, although expensive, ore In abundance. Neither docs there appear to be a scarcity of Christmas tree decorations. Every merchant has prepared for months to give his customers an. outstanding selection during the Christmas season. To inspect that selection the Winona area shoppers will have three special days In addition to the regular weekdays and the Friday night opening. Tho three special times are until 9 p. m. December 8, 13 and 20. Marshall Arranges to Meet Molotov Monday London Secretary Marshall .has scheduled a meeting Monday with Soviet Minister V. M. Molotov. Some diplomatic sources said today this will disclose whether East-West differences over writing a German peace treaty can be resolved at the present four-power meeting. The ministers met for the fifth day with no sign of agreement on a single major point. Russia the Western acknowledged indirectly tho possibility of collapse of efforts to write a treaty which would keep Germany harmless. The Murshall-MoJotov parley, one of ft of informal ministerial pairings, may have a decisive effect on the duration of the present con- ference. Yesterday thoy talked about what might happen If this conference bogs, 'did Jast spring, In disagreement: The Soviet union bumped Into un- budging refusal by appar- ently with American and French to relinquish in ad- vance the right of setting up n, pro- visional government In western Ger- many, should such a Btalenmto oc- ir. Molotov Demands Answer Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Mo- lotov insisted upon raising tho issue, damandinrc a yes or no answer on whether the Western powers had such a plan and adding that if they had "the governments Involved do not wish to reach an agreement here." Molotov didn't get a direct an- swer. However, British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin denied that Britain had such a plan and refused to commit his government or that of the British people "as to what might have to be done in the event of a "Big Four" failure to agree." "If In the end peace Is Bevin added, "then surely you can- not at tills stage ask us to stand still with Europe in chaos and not do anything at Marshall Silent French Foreign Minister Georges Bidault refused to say French stand would be. what the Italians Warned Of Civil War; Milan Riot Over Rome Former Premier Francesco SaverJo Nittl warned the constituent assembly today that "the specter of civil war" hovers over Italy. ars- 'and; always" more dangerous process of division, nmong the parties and nmong' declared the 79- year-old elder statesman. Nittl, leader of the small National Democratic Union party, addressed his words to "all who aspire to the reconstruction of "Italy, because of fascism and its braggadocio, has too many enemies and no true and real friends in the world except he said. Nltti's warning came as Interior Minister Mario Scelba, target of leftist blasts, defended tho govern- ment's handling yesterday of the Milan demonstrations against the removal of the provincial prefect, during which leftist organizations almost vaulted to power. The leftists wrung a promise from the Christian Democratic government that the prefect would remain. Thousands of demonstrators laid siege to the pre- fecture during the protests. Milan Normal Milan was back to normal today. Scelba told the assembly the out- break was without rhyme or reason, He said tho prefect, Ettore Trollo, had requested his own removal, had asked for a diplomatic assignment, and already had been offered a Temperature Drops to 4 Below Here and Streets Cleared of Snow Two upper Mississippi tow- boats were trapped between Wi- nona and the Twin Cities today, as Old Marx River congealed solidly Here from shore to shore in the face of sub-zero temperatures. The Winona mercury low-dip point this morning was -4, pro- viding the river in this area with Its earliest freezing date In the last ten years. Among towboats uprivcr arc Huck Finn and the Helena, the latter being reported in the vicinity of Hastings. Question posed is whether these boats on the upper river will assume the role of Ice- breakers and force their way down- stream or call for outside help to fight their wny downstream. Navi- gation Interests had hoped to con- tinue navigation until December 15. The ico at present is thin enough so that a towboat could force way through. Intervening would present no great problem: the ice hasn't piled up in front of them as yet. Tho river presented a snow-be- decked appearance here today to Friday's snowfall. A slight of freezing water could be seen on top of the ice near the downtown riverfront shoreline. The rest of river, across to the Latsch bathing beach, was In white crystalline form. lee Unaafe Winonans desiring to test thicknesses should be forewarned, however, that the Ice on any lake, pond or stream In the Winona area. Is unsafe. If anyone should find him or herself floundering alone in chilled, semi-frozen .water, in a hole In Ice, the best way to get out, ac- cording to Borne exports, is to turn over on your back In the water, breaking enough ice around you to surface.' Approach the Icy edges of hole on your bock and shove your head, and finally your arms onto the ice, You can help with Jog action In (Continued on Face 3. Column 4) FROZEN French storm wouia oe. The leftist benches were coldly he observed that Molotov had side- hostile as Scelba declared the leftist stepped committal on-the British- Press had suppressed the facts in steDDCd committal on -me rjiiwsn- backed proposal for an economic issuing news of Trollo's replacement, merger of the Saar-into the French He disclosed that a Milan "people's economy and said he would committee" was coming to Rome to himself of tho same privilege of. present data to the government on silence outbreak. The group IB headed U S Secretory of State George by Antonio Greppi, who resigned C. Marshall remained silent on the point, except to remind Molotov that the" U, S. more than a year ago had Invited the governments par- ticipating in Germany's occupation as Milan's mayor yesterday in a protest against the government's decision to replace Trollo. Call Off Strike A communique issued from the uClpaung ill ijrurimiuy i to join in Its economic integration.; prefect's office in Milan said a In most diplomatic quarters it government representative cfrtfrto who hurried from Rome to handle the situation had arrived at an agreement with the leftists under been expected that the United will tnke the lead if quick achieve- which they promised to call off a ment of German unity is not realized through a- plan designed to weave the country's industrial ma- general strike protesting the re- chine into the Marshall program forjmoval of the leftist prefect, pttore European recovery. Trollo. President And Mrs. Truman appear on the rear platform Of their train on arrival at Municipal sta- dium for Army-Navy game at Philadelphia today. In centeris; U. S. Senator Edward MartoiofPenn- sylvanla who was among officials who welcomed them. to The Republican-Herald.) Chile to Detain RUM Envoy Until Releate of Kin Chile Minister Vergara Donoso said to- day that Soviet diplomats still In Santiago would be kept here and would be sealed off from Moscow pending a Chilean appeal to the In- ternational court of Justice agmlnst a Soviet refusal to allow the Rus- sian daughter-in-law of Chilean Ambassador David Cruz Ocumpo to leave the TJ.S.S.R. Weather FEDERAL FORESASTS Minnesota: Increasing cloudi- ness tonight becoming mostly cloudy Sunday with occasional light snow, north and extreme west portion Sunday. Not so cold west and cen- tral portions tonight. Rising tem- perature Sunday. Wisconsin: Fair and continued cold tonight. Sunday increasing cloudiness and not so cold. For Winona and vicinity: Gen- erally fnir tonight, lowest five. In- creasing cloudiness Sunday with oc- casional light snow; highest 28. Not so cold. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 22; minimum, noon, 7; precipitation, .10, 3.6 inches show; sun'sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Mln. Prec. Bcmldjl 10 -11 Chicago ...........24 Denver ............58 Duluth 13 Los Angeles .......74 Miami ............73 MplS.-St. Paul 16 New Orleans....... 61 New York .........43 Phoenix ...........52 DAILY RIVER BULLETIN Flood SUffC 24-Hr. Stnse Today Change Bed Wing 14 23 Lake City 5.9 Reads.........12 3.1 Dam 4, T.W....... Dam 5, T.W....... Dam 5A, T.W...... Winona (C.P.) 13 Dam 6. Pool....... Dam 6, T.W....... Dakota 7.7 Dam 7, Pool....... Dam 7, T.W....... 2.2 La Crosso 12 5.1 Tributary Streams Chlppewa at Durand. IS Zumbro at Theilman. Buffalo above Alma... Trempealeau at Dodge 23 __ 2 51 66 9 33 31 43 4.3 2.7 3.7 5.7 10.0 4.4 .11 .02 .01 1.54 13 2.7 -f S JJ -f- 3 2.0 3..S J5 .1 J. Black at Galcsville La Crossc at W. Salem Root at Houston ......5.6 RIVER FORECAST (From Bastlncs to Gnttenberr, Iowa.) During the next 48 hours only minor fluctuations will occur due to Ice action. All pools are frozen over except some running ice above Fepln.   

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