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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: November 19, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 19, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER and T OMORROW Is Thursday Full Leated Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO. 233 W1NONA, MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING. NOVEMBER 19, 1947 Minneiska Fire Loss Placed at Committee in Senate Stop-Gap Aid Hearings on of Living Program Friday. Washington tfTV- The Senate foreign relations committee today approved legislation to provide emergency aid for France, Italy and Austria. Chairman Vandcnborg (R.- Mlch.) said tho vote was 13-0. Vandenberg told a news confer- ence that the committee also voted unanimously to plnce a number of amendments In tho bill, which had been mbmltted by tho State de- partment. One of these specified that the act -shall not Imply any obligation to give assistance to any of tho coun- tries mentioned nor shall It imply or Bunrantno the availability of any specific commodities." Vandcnbcrg said tho amendment Is Intended to answer criticism that our own economy is In short sup- ply with respect to many of the commodities outlined In tho bill. Meanwhile Chairman Robert Taft (R.-Ohlo) said tho Senate-House economic committee will begin hear- ings Friday on points in President Truman's cost of living program, but proposals for limited rationing and price- control will not bo In- cluded. Taft told reporters tho commtt- doelded to exclude from Its agenda, at least for tho present, the rationing and price control polnta. think that if we are going to rt anything out of special ses- idon of Congress we will havo to leave those points until tho regular Taft said. Damaged Bomber Lands Safely At Minneapolis pilot and four crewmen landed an A-20 me- dium bomber safoly at Wold-Cham- berlain Field last night after the had been damaged In the nlr on a training flight from here to Sioux City. Iowa. The plane, attochcd to the 178th squadron of the South Dakota na- tional guard and based at Bloux a View Of The Fire Scenes from the bluff above Minneiska, showing the rear of the A. J. Hartcrt Sons hardwaro store and tho burned slto of tho two other buildings. ran an oil burning heating stove exploded in tho Arbucklo apartment over the liquor store Flames rapidly engulfed the building. Four fire departments, Bollingstone, Kellogg, Altura and Winona, fought the flre lor nearly six hours Tuesday night.__________________ M i -v. After Two Buildings Were Destroyed In rapid sucession, firemen from four communities battled for three hours Tuesday evening in an attempt to save the hardware store of A. J Hartcrt i. Sons, Min- neiska the most prominent building on the village's main street. This picture shows the store burning, and part or the crowd of watchers Traffic on highway 61 blocked for three hours, contributed a large crowd of flre watchers. The hardwaro building was about 75 per cent destroyed.______________ Rape-Slayers Get Life; 'Sorry We Can't Hang Judge Tells Them Waupun, WIs. The great lifo terms, and they were tftkonjm- gruy gates of state prison locked two niodi more lifers away from the society they had wronged today, after four-day flight stemming from night of lust and murder yesterday an angry court. hours after their capture. Following their arrival at, the ft prison, they were interviewed by ended Jefferson County District Attorney Francis Oarlty In connection. Tossed free by tho automatic re- xossoa ircc- oy wio nuvumuwu mo day 01 ms lease mechanism, the canopy flew admitted the fatal shooting Friday thr xhln'n Atablllz- nf Cinrl 215. of SUD- neapolls. Other crewmen. backward, struck the ship's Stabiliz- ers and sent it into a downward spiral. When control was regained, Backer decided tho damaRe was not irreat enough to warrant abandoning the plane, and flew it back to Mln- all from Sioux Falls, were First Lieutenant Claude Hone, Second Lieutenant Robert L. Schmidt, and Sergeants Virgil Harms and Oorald Daily. Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS For Winona and Occa- sional light snow UinlKht changing to rain or snow Thursday becom- ing hruvlor. No decided change Jn Krnpcrnturc. Low tonight 30; high Thursday 30. Minnesota: Cloudy, with occa- sional llKht xnow south and scat- trrrd snow flurries north portion tonight and Thursday. Llttlo change In trmpornturp. winconKln: Cloudy, with occasional Hunt snow und lltllo change In temperature" tonluht find Thursday. LOCAL WEATHER Official obscrvnttons for tho 24 hours ending at 12 m. toddy: Maximum, 30: minimum, 31; noon. 33; precipitation, none; nun Kft-i tonight at sun rUos to- morrow at TKMrEKATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Mln. Prec. 27 23 .01 ,08 23 24 Duluth 20 Los AnKClc.i C7 Miami 81 77 Mpls.-St. Pnul 35 32 .03 New Orleans 04 57 1.70 New York 40 34 WnithlnRton 44 3B The Pus 1C 4 .01 DAILY RIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-Hr. StnKo Today Change Rod WlnK H 2.2 Lake City S.O 12 3.0 Dam 4. T.W. Diim 5, r.W. Dnm 5A, T.W. Winona (C.P.) 13 5.4 Dnm fl. Pool 10.0 Dam 0. T.W, 4.0 Dakota (C.P.) 7.3 Dam 7, Pool 0.3 Dam 7. T.W 1.8 Ln Crossc 12 Tributary Streams The two young men, wljo 24 hours before had been crouched In learured burn. witnessed the lightning mechanics of Wisconsin law, climiwinr shortly after 3 p. m yesterday when Superior Judge Roy Proctor Imposed sentence with scathing denunciation, "Words fall me in an attempt to express my utter contempt for UOTiai KUfiru HIIU utwtcu w Falls, encountered heavy weather the court said, adding a phrase or over Wlnnebago. Minn., late Tues- regret that tho sentence could not day and First Lieutenant John R. Backer, the pilot, ordered the plastic canopy over the cockpit ditched. be Buford under state Bennett, 22, and Robert Wlnsiow, who turned 24 the day of his conviction freely night of Carl Carlson, 25, of Sup- erior, Wis., and the subsequent mul- tiple-raping of his slstcr-ln of Cleveland Heights, Ohio, a univer- sity of Michigan cood. Following their arrest, after a 12- hour siege In a born on a north cen- tral Wisconsin farm, the pair also admitted -the shooting of Irene Kudrna, 14, and her sister, Betty, 10, of Phillips, on a lonely country rond three months ago In an effort "to get at" a third teen- age girl, who escaped by slipping out of her sweater and running. One of tho Kudrna Bisters still Is In tho hospital, Only for Murder Snnnott and Wlnsiow woro sen- tenced, however, only for tho mur- der of Carlson. At the hearing, at which tho men declined counsel, Judge Proctor told them: that ncv- or in tho state's history "has there and which been perpetrated by you two ruffians." the disappearance, last May 1 of eight-year-old Georgia Jean Weck- a road loading to hor farm homo. Owned Same Make Car aarlty sold Bennett owned a 1936 Ford tudor coach, a type of car reported to the vicinity at tho time of the girl's, disappearance, but added both men denied knowing anything about the case "except what they had read in tho papers." Garlty said the men asserted they had been working on farms near Owen and Rlchland Center at that time. He said he "didn't un- cover anything" in the Interview, but that ho "got enough Informa- tion'that I want to check things over and carry on a little more work." The spectacular began Frl-, day night, when Carlson, a navy! veteran and father of a small child, met the coed at the Madison depot when she arrived to see the Michi- gan-Wisconsin football game! In a statement, later confirmed by the men, tho girl said she and Carlson were picked up by Wlnsiow and Bennett, while hitchhiking to Carlson's home in Badger village. She said the men shot Carlson Jn tho back of the head, placed his 30dy in the trunk of the car and alternately raped hor. Carlflon's body later was weighted nnd-dumpod Into a tributary of the Wisconsin river, where it was re- covered yesterday. Tho girl escaped when her assailants' car became mired. Dane County District Attorney Edwin Wilkle obtained warrants to- day charging Sennett and Wlnsiow, with kidnaping and rape. Wlllklo said tho warrants would Republican-Herald Tho Scene Of The Minneiska flre.as It looks today from highway 61, looking south. The wreck Cf the A, J. Hartert Sons hardware building Is In the background. The smoking area Is where the Delbert Arbuckle liquor store and the Gerald Paine tavern, two two-story buildings, were located. These two buildings burned to the foundation. The street In front wan cleared of debris during the night. don't believe I would havo any be filed at the penitentiary and qualms whatever if our constltu- held there for several days pend- tlon provided that in cases like this ing possible similar action by other I would have tho power and author- counties. A decision then will be Ity to sentence you to the gas made whether to return Bennett chamber, tho electric chair or to and Wlnsiow to Madison lor trial bo hanged by tho nock until or hold tho charges in abeyance Judge Proctor sentenced both to ndeflnltely. Two-Mile Long Friendship Train Arrives in New York With 270 Cars New 270-car, two-mlle-long Friendship train, laden with gifts of food for France and Italy, rolled Into New York to m. spectacular welcome yesterday Including a city hall reception. The long string of cars carried about tons of basic food- at more than had been donated by the populaces of many cities and communities as It made Its cross- continental Journey from Los Angeles. It left the California city with 12 cars. The food Is scheduled to reach France on Christmas eve and Italy on New Year's day Family of Six Burns to Death East St. Louis, en- tire family of six Negroes burned to death1 today when flames apparent- ly resulting from the explosion of a coal oil stove destroyed their four- room frame house. Tho cloud were John Covlngton, Jr., 31, his wll'e, Ollle, 27, and their four children ranging in age from one. to seven years. Firemen summoned to the house by neighbors had no opportunity to rescue the trapped family, Fire Chief Russell Wright reported. Wright expressed belief the oil stovo ex- plosion threw flaming oil on tho two bodn whero members of tho family were sleeping. 13- Boy Wounded in William Tell Game, Dies Hackcttstown, N. year-old boy died today of a bullet wound In the head after n game of "William Tell" with loaded rifles had misfired'. Patrolman Orville Cox, who was summoned to the scene in the back of the property of George Krumm of Mountain avenue, found George pupil unconscious yesterday. A 12-year-old friend told 'Silent Guest' at Thanksgiving Urged As Aid Plan Plymouth, Mass. Gov- ernor Robert F. Bradford called upon the people of the nation today to share Thanksgiving dinner with starving Europeans by having a, "silent gucnt" ni the holiday feast. Tho appeal was made in be- half of "American Silent Guest, which proposes that the money that would bo spent on the "silent guest" If he were real be donated to buy food for the people of Europe. Tlin governor tbo pooplo of tho nation have a olianoo to share with tbo starving people of Europe even as the Pilgrims shared their "pitiful store of food" with less fortunate out- posts. The governor said that con- tributions should bo sent to "The American Silent Guest, Inc., PiJffTim Hall, Plymouth, Mass." correspondents In Ravcllo, a few miles from the scene, rccclTbd in- formation that 20 persons were dead and ten others injured. The Swedish airline office in Rome said its information was that the plane was Swedish, but was not one Bereaved Mother Robbed of DCS Fred M. Smith, whose 14-year-old son was eventh gmdelchool burned to death Monday when his the policeman, Cox said, that he and 3eorgo hod exchanged shots at a ;ln can on each other's head. jUrrlGQ tO QliUfUJ. VUlkAllib clothing caught flre, returned Tues- to the 37 states east of the Rocky day after visiting her husband who Mountains. Is ill at a hospital. Air Crash Near Salerno Kills 20 Russia Lying and She Knows It, Marshall Charges By Edward E. Domar Washington Secretary o State aeorge Marshall injected new element of toughness today in this country's patient-but-firm poll cy toward Russia. Charging that Soviet officials an their communist allies arc lying nn know they're lying In a and contemptuous" propaganda bar rage against his European recovery program, Marshall declared, "It 1 time to call halt." "We do not propone to stand b; and watch, the disintegration of th International community to which we the cabinet officer as aerted on the eve of his departure for a face to face meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Molotov. But while his speech In Chicagi last night was his toughest yet aj n cabinet officer, Marshall never theless pledged that his sole aim tit next week's "Big Four" foreign ministers' conference in London will be to find a sound basis for a European peace settlement. 'Goaded' The secretary omitted any men- tion of the Idea of making peace with Germany without Russia Rather he said the United States will work for the creation of "a provisional central authority In federated German state" as a step toward the final framing of formal treaty. For himself, he said, 'No matter the his onl; purpose at London will be to enc the present "tragic stalemate and transport plane, be- 8peed the advent of a new en lieved to be Swedish, crashed in the of peace and hope for Europe and mountains near Salerno today and the world." or Its ships. Carablnlerl officials at. Salerno said a party had been dispatched to tho scene or tho crash, believed to bo on Mount Scala. Flight operations officers at Clam- plno Air field in Rome, said the craft carried Swedish military per- sonnel. FOB shrouded the mountains at the time of the crash. Seven Per Cent Construction Gain for 1948 Forecast New W. Dodge Corpor- ation, fact-finding organization for the construction Industry, estimates a seven per cent gain In construc- tion contracts In 1948 over the ac- tual volume reported for this year However, Marshall said tho Am- erican people havo been goaded Into "active resentment" by tho cam- paign of "vilification and distortion of American motives In foreign af- fairs" waged by both Soviet offi- cials and communist groups. "These opponents of recovery charge the United States with Im- perialist design, aggressive pur- poses, and finally with a desire to provoke a third world war." the soldier-diplomat declared, lidding: "I wish to state emphatically that there is no truth whatsoever In these charges, and I add that those who make them are fully aware of this fact." Campaign' Started Marshall" thus appeared to be touching off the intensified Amer- ican "truth campaign" which high government officials Eaid earlier this month was In the making. Without mentioning names, the cabinet officer took critical note of the "warmongering" charge Molotov's deputy, Andrei A. Vish- insky, has been leveling against many Americans at tho United Nations general assembly. The total amount estimated for 2 Chlppewii at Durand 2.8' .8 Zumbro al Thellman ..2.4 .2 Buffalo above Alma---- 2.2 .1 Trcmpenlcau at Dodge Black at Nclllsvlllo 3.0 niftck nt Oalesvlllo 2.0 -I- .1 La Cro.Mp at W. Salem 2.3 .0 Root at Houston 5.7 .1 RIVER FORECAST (From to GuUonberif, Iowa) No Rate operation is Indicated over Thursday so there will bft lit- tle change In the rlvor stagos throughout this district in that Ume. 111 ai a nospimi. The total amount esumawsa iui During her absence the Smith next ycar js against homo had been robbed of ja vojume Of reported the first nine months of the year plus an estimated volume for the last quarter of 1947. The corporation estimates a nine per cent gain In nonrcsidentlal construction, a four per cent gain In residential contract letting and a seven per cent gain In heavy engi- neering work over the 1947 record. The largest percentage gains In the major construction classification next year are expected In hospital and institutional building, with ex- pectation of a 70 per cent Bain In social and recreational build- ing, up 30 per cent, and public buildings, up 29 per cent. The Dodge corporation expects a dollar volume of single-family and two- family residential structures to exceed this year's record by one per cent, with a 14 per cent gain in apartment house awards. Tho only major classification for which a decline Is expected next year Is in manufacturing buildings, for which a drop of 14 per cent Is estimated. "Today our people have been virtually driven into a state of ac- tive resentment and, having been goaded to this point, they ore ac- cused of having lighted and stoked this great flre of public resent- the secretary asserted. Blum Agrees to Form Government A spokesman for the Socialist party announced today that former Premier Leon Blum had agreed to try to form a new govern- ment. A rising wave of communist-led strikes provided the background. The announcement was nindc by Guy Mollct. secretary general of the Socialist party. Mollet, considered a member of the left wing of the Socialists, said he believed a new cabinet would be formed within a few days to succeed that of Socialist Premier Paul Ramadicr. Mollct said France had permitted herself to be divided into two groups and that, if civil war should result, it would be "as bad as It was In Spain." i 3 Business Places Destroyed Caused by Oil Stove Explosion in 'Apartment By Staff. Writer Three business In Minneiska, a third or In the village, were destroyed by fire with a loss of approximately Tuesday evening. Minneiska Is 17 mUes north of Winona on highway 61, the main street through the village. This main north-south highway was blocked for three hours by the tire. Buildings burned to the ground were the liquor store op- erated by Dclbert Arbuckle and the tavern operated by Gerald Paine. Partly destroyed was tno largo hardware store of A. J. Hartcrt and Sons. An oil stove explosion in the Ar- kutklc apartment above the liquor store, caused the fire and dcsplto the efforts of four fire departments It ate Its way southward through the business block until the stores were engullcd in flames. "I was In the store talking to a Mrs. stated, when I heard a dull thud, upstairs. Thero was no one up there, our three children were playing In of the store. I rushed and the rooms were lull of smoke. When I opened the door, flumes filled the living room where the burner oil heater was located." Spread AUrm Driven out by the Intense smoke. Mrs. Arbucklo rushed to the street and spread the alarm. This was about p. m. Volunteers manned the hand-pulled fire apparatus, mud soon a line of hose poured water on the building; from the rel reservoir built for fire protection for the village on tho bluffsldt Jurt above tho main street. Volunteers also started out the stock of liquor, valued at more than Some of stock was stored in a backroom up- stairs and was pawed to the crowd jclow through a window. Some wu carried across the street to an ele- vator. Flames, however, soon broke through the first floor, and the smoke made It impossible to work within the building. Calls for help were placed to Rolllngstone. Kellogg, Altura and Winona fire departments, which, responded with pumper trucks. With the liquor store engulfed In. flames, efforts were directed toward saving tho Ed Heaser grocery store ust north of the liquor store, and Paine tavern Just south, of the turning building. The Hollingstone department, first to arrive, was assigned to pump from the big reservoir on the hill- side. Break Out Flames broke out on the roof of the Paine tavern, an old two-story wooden building owned by Kick ileyers, Winona, in which was also ocatcd Leo Daniel's barber shop, and tho old Workman's hall, up- stairs. This hall had not been used recently. Some of the stock within the structure was carried but not enough help was available and most of the worth of merchandise and all the fixtures and equipment n the place were destroyed. The jarbcr rescued his barber chair. Traffic was closed on the high- way. Stnto highway patrolmen w- Ived, and road blocks were set up it each end of the village. When the Altura, Kellogg and Wl- lona pumpers arrived they were igncd to pumping water from the .llssissippl river, across the MJlwau- cce railroad tracks below the main treet. The lines of hose were run under the railroad tracks through a ulvert. Soon a half dozen lines of water were being poured on the burning Paine tavern. Truck drivers and armors from the surrounding coun- Contlnued on Page 16, Column 1) FIRE reighter Reaches Survivors of ihipwreck Halifax. N. S. The British elghtcr Empire MncCalUm rcport- today she had begun taking board survivors of the shlp-wreck- d Ircightcr Langleecrag alter their Ivc-day ordeal of being marooned n bleak Sacred Island, off the orthem tip of Newfoundland. The Empire MacCalum, one of ur ships which plunged through CAvy seas toward the Island on missions, reported she ar- at midnight and stood by until aylight to take aboard the crew- men. The Langleecrag also was British ship. For five days the usly estimated at from 30 to 34 lashed by icy rain ..d buffeted by giant breakers while iclr radio operator sent out frantic icssages that time was running out. ne man was lost when the ship smashed on the shore reefs and roke In two early Saturday.   

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