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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, November 6, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 6, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W BATHER colder. c OME TO THE Winona Mardl Oru November 6-7-8 Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO. 222 WINONA, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 6. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY Molotov Raps U. S. Bases Near Russia President Mardi Gras Opens Tonight; Wants Action Route of Friday Parade Set On Aid First Dodges Question on 'Choice of Running Mate' njr II. Cornell President Tru- miin wild todny ho Is Imppy over the blc election turnout last Tues- day bccau.-.e It shows people are thrlr responsibility as juit Ihr chief executive again declined to bite nt a nown conrcr- rnee question which would have nhown his own political Intentions for next year. That wu.i un Inquiry ns to wheth- er ho hu.i mado his "choice for a running mute" in the 1048 presl drntlul election, Mr. Tnmiiin IniiRhcd and sal thnt was ii lending question an he had no comment, Ho llkcwls hnd no comment on n lot of othe things. In a lengthy discussion o the coming special session of Con Kress Us related problems however, he said: The. question ot emergency all to Europe and Inflation at horn are of equal Importance. Altl Action Fir.it He hopes Congress will act on European aid first. He will mnk that clear In ft message at th November 17 opening of tho session A lonK-rnnKO plan for hclpln Europe, after the Ktop-gnp program will be sent to Congress when 1 l.i before or after th regular session beginning In Jan unry. On other subjects: administrations view go Into tho annual mcssftg to Congress on tho sttvto of union nt the start of tho regular session In January. As for vetoing nnothc Republican tax cutting bill, ns hi did twlco last MSslon, thnt will bi decided when tho situation come up. Meanwhile Speaker Mnrtin lined up with President Truman toda> in opposition to any tax reduction legislation at tho special session of Conttrcss. (Mnrtin (R.-Mnss.) told n conference ho believes tho spccla senslon will be kept too busy con- sidering foreign nld and price legis- lation to take- up taxes. But he said It wns his own "per nonnl Inclination" thnt tnx reduc- tions should bo considered as the first order of business nt tho rceu- lur session starting in Food Situation President has no ex- pectation that Charles Luckman will resign soon as chairman of tho citizens food committee, even though a, reporter said tho AKlrculturo de- partment estimate, that nil tho bushels of Krnln Amorlct hns been asked to mivo now Is In In the "no comment" department: The Senate Investigation of How- nrd Hushes' wartime piano con- tracts, the IIou.so tin-American ncttvltlcs committee Investigation of communism In Hollywood, a sug- gestion by grain exchanges thai they would like, a congrcxslona Inquiry about their operations. Asked about a report of tho Amrrlcun Society ot Newspaper Editors opposing military secrecy In civilian (Icpiirtrnents of tho govern- ment, the President said ho has taken no action on tho mutter I that H is bad for tho press to get hold of preliminary reports and then set up straw men to knock down. Mardi Gras Program Tonight 6 p. for 4-H Mardl Gras queen can- didates. 8 p. armory- -Eight-bout boxing show. p, High school or conse- quences show, Bob DeHaven master of ceremonies, 175-volce Wi- nona Civic chorus, novelty acts, Freddie Heyer, Jr., Winona State Teachers college swing band. 10 p, High school perform- ance of entire truth or consequences show. Friday H a, m.__85 Winona merchandise treasure hunt. Boxing Show and Musical Program Headliners Tonight Route for the Winona Mardi Gras two-mile character balloon parade Friday was announced today, open- Ing day of the three-day by John W. Dugan, grand marshal of the procession. Route of the parade will be: Starting and Third street at p. m, and then, West on Third street to WiiNhinc- ton Ntrcct, North on Washington street to Woods Denies Chicago Rent Hike Washington Housing Ex- pediter Tlgho E. Woods today re- jected n recommendation of the Chicago rvnt advisory board for n 15 per cent rent Increase in the Chicago area. Woods .-.aid tho advisory board fallt-d to "upproprlatcly substantiate Us recommendation, as required by the nrul rent net of 1047.' Woods, whn niuncd acting ex- pediter only liL-it week, nclvlsed John Joseph liyiin, chairman of tho Chlnigo bonrd: "Since your recommendation docs not contain nny substantial evidence or data ON required by tho net, It must be disapproved. This denial, however, doo.s not prohibit it fu- ture recommendation properly sub- stantiated." It wns tho flr.st rent decision by Woods since he succeeded Frank Crerdon in the housing post. Alexandria Girl U. of M. Queen Audrey Tol- Icfson. Alcxiinclrlii, lust nlKht was rhoM-n Uiilvrrsliy of Minnesota qurrn to prcr.lck: over homecoming festivities this weekend. Among her roynl iittciulimts arc Shirley Sag- nc.vt, BreckenrldKC, and Audrey Oruupmnnn. llochi-stc-r. Rochester Optimist Club to Get Charter Tho Optimist club o! Rochester. Is to receive Its charter wltliln wcck.'i. rimv: for one of tho mnjor proj- ects of the OpMnilst of Junior units for tho boys; di.icusr.cd during tho regular! I 12 p. for visiting p. character balloon parade, clowns, Jeep floats, 14 bands and marching units, 12 prin- cipal parade divisions. p. street in front of the concert of parade-participating bands, 8 p. High school 'football game. Saturday a. children's movies. H a. parade. p. street between Second and Third demonstration Second street, and East on Second street to Franklin 2 p Mary's Concordia football came, helicopter demonstration at halftlme. 3 p. dopllght and precision flying by flight of Mustangs. 8 p. Gras masquerade dance, coronation of the six 4-H Mardl Oras queens. All events during the Mardl Gras will be free to the public except the boxing show and the football Mill City Fireman Killed During Night Club Blaze Minneapolis Henry Oblnger, Minneapolis fireman, was killed Wednesday night when fire started from a kitchen grease llareup razed the Interior ot the Happy Hour cafe and night club at Nice-net avenue and 16th street. Oblnger, with six-other, firemen, was inside the rear of-the-cafe 0 when the plastered metal lath ceil- ing fell. His comrades fled to safety but Obinger was pinned down by the debris and fellow firemen had to use. wrecking cars to free him. General hospital physicians work- ed over the victim for an hour at the scene before they pronounced him dead. Obinger, 34, is survived by his widow and two small chil- Poultry Glutting Market, Farm Department Says Agriculture department reported the fifth poultrylens Thursday of the food conservation the nation's markets nro being glutted with poultry. Prices nro going down, It added, and city dealers are urging coun- try shippers to hold their chickens back for lack of n. market. Oold atorago stocks of frozen poul- try, which on October 1 wcro at record levels for thnt date, contin- ued to Increase last month to such nn extent thnt the Industry was said ;o bo running out of space to store dressed poultry. Tho I'rlccs Arc department added in Its monthly report on tho poultry mar- ket that the low volume of con- sumer buying "mystified" the trade because poultry was being offered at prices relatively low as compared with other meats. The report wns issued as repre- sentatives of the poultry Industry renewed their efforts to get the citi- zens food conservation committee leaded by Charles Luckman to do nway with the poultry less part of Its program. Tho objective of tho poultryless Thursday ns explained by the com- mittee Is to discourage feeding of trains and poultry so that more ce- reals might bo saved for export to shortage areas abroad. Tho poultry Industry argues that tho committee's action Is In effect causing Increased rather .than de- creased consumption of grain. Instead ot winding up on con- sumer dinner tables chickens are remaining on farms, the Industry says, to consume more feed. -e in the parade will meet at Third and Li- berty street p, m. Friday to bo assigned their line-up points. All public and parochial schools will be dismissed by 2 p. m. for the parade. Fhelps students will be free at p. m. Parochial schools will be dismiss- ed at these times: Cotter, p. m.; Cathedral High school, 12 p. m.; St. Thomas Pro-Cathedral, 12 p. m.; St. Stanislaus, p. m.; St. Casimir's, 12 p. m., and St. John's and St. Joseph's, by 2 p, m. St. Martin's will have no Showdown Expected at London Meet Talk of Separate Peace May Needle Russ to Cooperate By .Tolin M. Hlfrhlowcr Jesse Palmer Anderson, star route. La Crosse, and Ralph M. Gundcrson, route one, Mcndoro. Acquaintances Mounting the men were close friends, erlean demands for an early peaee Neither was married Two Dead in Auto in River Near La Crosse La Crosse, bodies I slough by deputy sheriffs using a of two middle-aged La Crosse coun- ty men were found yesterday In an automobile which apparently had plunged into waters adjoining the Black river several days ago. Dr. George Reay, county coroner, wrecker and squad cars. The tor of the submerged vehicle had been sighted by a school teacher, Mrs Bert Reichert. who notified th sheriff's department. Dr.- Reay said Indications wer the car plunged the road at a said the men had been identified as sharp curve near the slough bridg settlement in Europe seem certain today to force a United States- Russia showdown in the "Big Four" foreign ministers' meeting nt Lon- don later this month. Some authorities believe that if the London conference falls to! make definite progress on a Ger- man pence treaty and to complete an Austrian .settlement, the last vestige of great power unity as symbolized In the conferences of the foreign ministers may be de- stroyed. Formal American policy for the London-meeting remains to be dis- closed. But it appears certain thai Secretary of State George Marshall will give serious weight to proposals by former Secretary James F Byrnes and Senator Arthur Van- dcnbcrg CR.-Mich.) that Russia's veto in the foreign ministers' The bodies were found when the car was hauled from a Black river Sunday night. The car was found in seven and one-half feet of water about 20 feet from the bank. The watches of both men had stopped at 6 o'clock, Reay said Duck hunters noticed that the water was muddy but did not see the car school all'day because of a teachers'jell no .longer be allowed to stand convention. P" way at least a partial Wlnona's stores and the city'European settlement. building will bo closed only during the parade and will reopen imme- diately following it. Weather forecast for Friday, inci- dentally, calls for mostly cloudy with occasional snow or rain and cloudy. High mercury reading will be 44. Today's activities are the queens Le- gion boxing show and truth or con- sequences funfest. Approximately 65 4-H girls from five neighboring Houston, Wabasha, Buffalo and .and'1- front" Winona county, selected on the basis of .their 4-H records, ranging in MMUe guests ol the Winona ,tion of Commerce agricul-. tural committee at a, dinner at 6 p. m. today in the Hotel Winona. Six Queens These girls will select six Mardl Gras queens, one from each of the represented counties, to take part in Byrnes Speaks Byrnes a speech at Winston- Salcm, N. C., Inst night, predicted In effect that the foreign minister system of' pence-making would fail to produce an early German settle- ment and proposed that the United States take the lead In calling a formal peace conference for early next year. If the Russians refuse to join In calling tho conference and to abide by its decisions, Byrnes declared, "then the othur Allied nations should go ahead, without them." "This would1 not be making a separate he added. "It would simply be saying that no one n y.on can veto peace on earth." has advocated substantial- ly the same line on previous oc- casions and the idea also has the support of Vandenbcrg, who not only is chairman o" the Senate foreign relations committee but perhaps Marshall's leading adviser dren. About 80 patrons in the cafe and bar got out of the building before the fire hnd gained any great head- coronation ceremonies Saturday pn__peace-roaklng issues. i night at the masquerade ball. Set for 8 o'clock tonight is an eight-bout boxing show In the ar- mory sponsored by the American way. Deputy Fire Chief Charles A. Legion. Hcadlincr will be a Wi- Johnson said the flames spread through ft grease chuto Into a small attic and had engulfed almost tho entire roof before first apparatus arrived. Oblngor was tho sixth Minneapo- lis fireman to porlsh In lino of duty this year. Three wore trapped and killed and a fourth died as result of the Hull-Dobbs garage fire Janu- (Contlnued on Pane 17, Column 5) FIRE 18-Month-Old Boy Run Over by Train, Unhurt Green Bay, run over by a locomotive Tuesday night, David Arnold, 18 months old, was unscathed, but his mother was hos- pitalized with a fractured kneecap. The toddler was at play on the tracks near his home with other children. The freight warning whistle sounded and the other youngsters scurried for safety. Mrs. Richard Arnold saw her son stumble and fall between the tracks, and rushed to his rescue. In her laste, she missed a step and fell heavily fracturing her kneecap. Engineer George Brown applied the brakes but could not bring the locomotive to a halt until the pilot and front trucks had passed over ;he boy. Witnesses squirmed beneath the engine to find David lying fright- ened but without a scratch between the drive wheels. nona amateur, Jerry Mourning, dis- trict Golden Glovus welterweight titlclst. Climaxing opening day activities at and 10 p. m. today will be two performances of the truth or consequences show under tho direc- tion ot Bob DcHavnn, Twin Cities radio personality. Several hundred dollars in prizes will be given away during the questioning. Appearing on the high school auditorium program also will be the 175-voicc Winona Civic chorus un- der the direction of Irving H. Ting- Icy. Freddie Hcycr, Jr., and his 18- piece Winona State Teachers college swing band will further enliven pro- ceedings. Song line-up for the civic chorus Includes "Pep: O' My "Bells of St. "Blue and the choir's theme song "Look for the Silver Lining." There will also be songs in which both. the audience and chorus will participate. Emcee DeHaven will audition a new novelty band, composed of fun- loving Winona musicians, during the course of the program. The same show, Incidentally, will be performed twice tonight. Highlight event Friday will be the two-mile, 12-unit parade through Wlnona's decorated downtown sec- tion. Leading the procession will be the American Legion, color guard, (Continued on Page 17, Column 1) MARDI GRAS berg declared in a speech at Ann Arbor, Mich., Monday that "the peace conference should be called by those who do agree." Marshall 'to Do Ills Best' Of his own attitude.Marshall said he intends to do his best to sec whether the foreign ministers can find a basis for a German settle- ment, adding that he never allows himself to bo pessimistic ns to the outcome of nny operation in which ho Is engaged. So 1'rir, there has been no official Intimation from the State depart- ment that it might try to force peace conference cull, with or with- out Russian agreement. But the cfi'cct of the rising of American, demands for such an action will be to confront the Rus- at London with an. implied choice of two simple alternatives: Either to agree to stops likely to speed German peace settlement or be more or loss compelled to stand aside while Uio western powers pro- ceed to try to moke pence without them. Deputy Ministers Meet to Map Conference London D.cputy foreign ministers of the "Big Four" met an atmosphere of pes- tackle the tough, dead- locked problems involved in writ- Ing peace treaties for Germany and Austria. Tho deputies, charged with doing the spadcwork for a meeting of the council of foreign ministers here on November 25, convened amid re- ports that Britain, France, Russia and the United States were as bad- ly split as ever on the major issues iii the two treaties. Former Secretary Of State James F. Byrnes, left, chats with the Right Rev. 'Henry Knox Sherrill of New York city, presiding bishop of the Protestant Episcopal church of America at a banquet at Winston-Salem, N. .C. (A.P. Wirepnoto to The Republican- Herald.) Give Most Aid to Countries Helping Selves, Ball Urges By Jack Bell Washington A plan, to give the bulk of American aid to European countries which, do the most to help themselves was proposed today by Senator Joseph Ball Ball, a member of the appropriations committee which will pass on funds to pay for the admin- stratton's proposed European re- covery- program, proposed that eco- nomic rebuilding materials be fur- Flat Found for Family of 11 That Refused to Split New York A seven-room Joioph H. Boll nlshed on an "in- centive quota" basis. As ho explained tho plan, coun- tries which could show increases In their home pro- duction in Beml- yearly surveys would continue to draw full Ameri- can a i d While those who Indi- cated less Inclina- tion to help them- selves would be penalized. The Minnesota! Flying Lands in N. Y. New York Benrinjr a Connecticut license ulntc, a Ktnnll flylnp "automobile" land- ed at La Guanlln. Field yester- day. Three and n. liulf minutes later, with wings and propeller removed, It was buzzlnflr along the highway into New York. Called nn ".ilrphlbian" and rcsembllns; n. cronn lictwren a ntatlon wnifon nml n, model nlr- plunr. It WIM flown hero from Danbury, Conn. The name of its drivcr-pilot- Invcntor: Robert Edison Fulton, senator made this proposal after conferences with Chairman Arthur Vandenbcrg of the Sen- ate foreign relations committee. Vandcnberg. who has declined specific comment 011 the impending economic assistance program since his return to Washington, Is ex- pected to announce a time sched- ule of committee hearings on emer- gency relief proposals and the long- range Marshall plan. Indications arc that he will rec- ommend that the committee listen to witnesses on the i'ull recovery program but concentrate its efforts on clearing before Christmas legis- lation authorizing an emergency outlay of for food and fuel to tide France and Italy over tho worst of the winter. Also in- cluded in this program is an addi- tional to meet rising American occupation costsi abroad. This schedule would postpone un- til after Congress meets in regular session in January any final deci- sion on the Marshall plan. As suggested by Secretary of State Mnrslmil, that plan calls for the United Sl.ate.s to buck up with Am- erican, dollars and goods a self-help program drafted by cooperating Eu- ropean nations. Sixteen countries of western Europe decided at Paris they will need some ___ _..... in outside of it from this flat hns been found for the Me- bring about their cco- Donald clan, three members of jiomic recovery during the next four Give Once and Give for Nine -i which had defied attempts to oust them from their Brooklyn home this week after the flimsy building hud been condemned by the city as unsafe. yeai's Bull's proposal is one of several limitations on the Marshall plan certain to be suggested by Republi- cans when congressional commit- The New York city housing have heard the evidence mid thority said yesterday it had located .before them by the administrations an apartment large enough to house I experts, all 11 mcmbsrs of the family of President Truman may forestall Four Amlsh Churchmen Relax on bended arms nt Wooster, Ohio, ns they prepare defense against a I Andrew McDonald, long- shoreman, and thnt it would be made ready for occupancy if Mc- Donald is satisfied with It. Mrs. McDonald, 42, and two of her nine children, hnd refused since Monday to leave their home, remaining in the condemned house despite the presence of a policeman and a building depart- ment Inspector who had barred the i return of the husband and the i seven other children. McDonald was i readmitted yesterday. City officials previously had of- fered to find the McDonnlds a place to live IT thuy would split up but Mrs. McDonald rejected the suggestion. "The holidays are she said, "and I gether." want my family to- some of these by suggesting his own set of requirements when he sends or brings his European recovery message to Congress. Unless lie changes his plans, the President also is expected to recommend spe- cific measures designed to curb ris- ing food and other costs at home which could throw the foreign aid program sharply out of balance if unchecked. Tho special House committee on foreign aid assembled meanwhile for its second day of closed door hearings after two sessions failed to produce agreement on speeiSc recommendations for an assistance program. Vice-chairman Herter (R.-Mncs) told newsmen after yesterday's sec- ond meeting that "some progress" has been made, but he refused to say what it was. Contributions lo the 1947 Wi- nona Community chest rose to at noon today, 89 per cent of the quota. All solicitors arc urged to turn in their cards to the Commu- nity cbcst office by Friday. Construction Viewed As Aggressive Atom Bomb No Longer Secret, Diplomat Declares London Soviet Minister V. M. Molotov declared to- day the United States was estab- lishing new naval and air close to Russia "as a preparation, lor aggression." He declared in a Moscow addreM the secret of the atom bomb Ions censed to exist" and then .sailed tho United for to keep the secret. (A Polish official attending the United Nations general assembly at Lake Success said the secret of tlw atom bomb has been known for some time, but the technique of producing thn it to- a secret. Molo- tov did not specify RunUn scientists had learned this tech- nique.) Anniversary Talk Molotov, speaking on the ere of the 30th anniversary of the Russian revolution, told the Russian people In a speech broadcast from Mot- cow: "It is intcrcit'.ng that in the ex- pansionist circles or the United States a new, peculiar sort of Il- lusion has been formed about their internal belief In secret of the atom bomb, although tills secret has long ceased to ex- ist." A Moscow radio commentator cald cheers greeted this remark. "Evidently the imperialists need this faith in the atom bomb, -which as is known, is not a means of de- fense but n weapon of Molotov said. "Many are Indignant that the U.S-A. and Great Britain hamper the United Nations from adopting a final decision on the pro- hibition of atomic weapons." Russia's "Industrial output readied prewar Molotor said. "Had there been no war, then would today have been unheard-of advances in our cities and But for the war, 'Which, destroyed many important tcrs, we would bo better supplied to- dny than any other country In rope or elsewhere. Molotov said the 30 years of Rus- sia's history since the revolution could be divided into three periods: The first, between 1917 and tin firm establishment of Soviet power, up to the five-year period. "The .second, the period of Second World Brent patri- otic war. The third, the new period which. which Is Just beginning." Molotov asserted the Soviet union wns Intent upon following a path (Continued on Tom 17, Column MOLOTOV Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Moitly cloudy with occasional snow or and colder tonight and Friday. Low tonight 30; high Friday cloudy, witli south and east central por- tions this aftcmoon'ftnd tonight, ex- cept mostly rain In extreme south- east. Rather heavy snow with 3 to G inches accun.ulating In n 100 to 50 mile band from Lincoln and Stone counties east-northeastward across state to Pine county south- ward to the Twin City area, end- ng late tonight. Decreasing cloudl- icss Friday. Slightly colder most sections. rain or snow northwest and north central pcr- ions and rain remainder of state xinight and Friday. Colder south. nd central portions Friday. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the flours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 51: minimum, 31: noon, 42: precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- norrow at ____ TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. MIn. Pep. Bcmidjl 25 .01 lCiiKO .............53 42 .02 Di-mvr 22 .23 Duluth "8 31 -13 ntcn-mtionnl Falls ..45 33 Cnnsns City .........60 40 Wlami 72 viinneapolls-St. Paul .49 30 .02 >Jew Orleans ........72 53 Hegina .............32 22 DAILY RIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-Hr. Stage Today Change Dnm 3. T.W....... 2.0 -r .3 Red Wing 11 2.5 J. Lake City 6.2 -t- J. Reads .........12 3.5 -r i Dnm 4, TAV....... 4.1 Dnm 5, T.W....... 2.3 Dnm 5A, T.W..... 3.1 Winona 13 5.3 Dnm Pool....... 10.1 Dnm G. T.W....... 4.1 Dakota........... 7.5 Dnm 7, Pool....... 0.4 Dam 7. T.W....... J-6 La Crosse 12 4.6 Tributary Streams Chippcwa nt Durand. 2.5 Zumbro at Thollman. 2.0 Buiralo above Alma... 2.2 Trcmpealcau at Dodge 3 Black at Ncillsville... 3.0 Black nt Galesvlllc 2.7 La Crosse at W. Salem 1.7 ut Houston ......5.7 RIV1CR. FORECAST (From to Guttcnbenr, Iowa) There will be practically no chi n the river stages over the end. 4 J. 4- i J. _L   

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