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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: October 30, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 30, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER low timlithl 41. 01. V OTE FOR Swimming Pool Project Full Leased Wire News Report of The Anociated Prw Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 216 w.NONA. MINNESOTA. THURSDAY EVENING. OCTOBER 30. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY, EIGHTEEN PAGES Marshall Drafts Aid Plan Republican-Herald Photo loft to right, Teresa wlnona residents are urged tho traditional festivity Friday evening. to turn in false alarms as part Winona Friday evening arc nve. 1212V4 West Broadway, and Number Cited For Contempt Reaches Ten Hollywood screen writers were- cited for contempt by a House un-AnaWr lean activities- today, bringing to ten the number thus accused. Ring Lardncr. Jr., .and Leiter Oolo were cited when they refund to give "yes or no" answers to whether they ara or have bees communists. Aa In the eight previous cases. the commute presented testimony from Investigators of finding evidence that the men cited have been affiliated with tho Communist Like the others cited, the wlt- took the stand that the committee had no right to ask ques- tions about political beliefs. R script writer who adapted "Forever Amber" to the screen. tho first witness called na the committee went Into the ninth day of public hearings In investigation of communism In Hollywood. The 32-year-old, thin Lardncr with a nervous voice, prompt- ing Chairman Thomas (R.-N. J.) to remark "You haven't learned your lines very well." The resumption of tho hearings WM delnyrd by a closed-floor ses- sion of the committee to consider the future course of 1W hearings. No announcement was mado to any decisions reached. Thomas hod said earlier that tho State Bonk Assets Top Billion Mark Russ Hold U.S.-Born Girl As Slave Laborer Governor of Oregon Dead In Air Crash Wreckage Found, in Mountain Area; Four Aboard Killed Klamath Falls, Ore. The wreckage of a plane carrying Gov- ernor Earl Snell of Oregon and two other top offiicals and the pilot was reached by a search party to- day and there were no survivors, Fremont forest supervisor Merle Ixjwden said today. Lowdon said that Ranger Jack Smith, with tho party at the wreckage, reported by portamu radio' that tho aircraft was com- pletely demolished and four bodies were found. Aboard the single engine four- place sportsplane were Governor Earl Wllcox Snell, 82: State Senate 'resident Marshall Oornett, 49, next n line of succession to the gover- norship: secretary of State Robert 8 Parrell. Jr., 41, and Cliff Hogue, 42, Klamath Falls, the pilot. Speaker to Succeed Confirmation of the death of the governor and his normal successor, ;he senate president, automatically elevates tho speaker ol the state house of representatives to ;he governorship. Ho is John H Hall, 48, a Portland attorney and World War I Veteran, and like all Oregon key executives Is a Rcpub- The three Oregon officials had planned a direct flight to the ranch of Oscar Kittredge. Bad weather forced the party to halt hero for dinner at tho Oornott home. Latoi Lhu wonthor indicated clear- ing conditions and they took off. The first report that the plane had disappeared came yesterday Margin Slim As Labor Party Wins Test in Commons committee would develop from a wltnww "sensational rrtdrnco about atom bomb cspto- Thomas snltl thn committee plans to rnfl the hfiirliiKu tomorrow -with- out culling Charlie Chaplin as it witness. the film star Is under subpoena. Asked whether the fact that tho Senate war investigating committee its Inquiry Into Howard Hughes' wartime airplane contracts nrxt wrrlc had anything to do with the dftriftioii to end tho Hollywood M-Mion this week. Thomas replied: "We're not icolnB <-o run into that." llr uddrd that Uir committee may hnvp another hrurlnK later on spe- cific inovlrs to determine wholhor ol them contain communist propaganda. The eight witnesses against whom the cotnmltu-o had by Wednesday recommended contempt action are niters John Howard Lawson, Dal- t.rm Trumbo, Alvnh Bessie. Albert MRIU. Somurl Ornlu and Herbert Hibernian. Director Edward Drny- tryk and Producer Adrian Scott. CreditorTPick Up Car, Held for Theft Law-ton. Okln. Two Mln- nmota men were charged today with automobile theft in what Sheriff Ed Oartrcl! said apparently was a "nlrect. action" attempt to rt-paiCTCft a uwcl cur. The men charged are Kenneth Ertckson. 24. ot Minneapolis, and Robert Kiw, 24, ot St. Paul. Erlck- son pleaded innoront when nr- ruignrd yesterday and Klso still 13 ht liberty. Sheriff GartiYl! wild the two traveled to Oklahoma at tho re- quest of a Minneapolis credit com- pany to retrieve H used fur on which it held a first mortgage. The sheriff sale! they towed car from the Intent owner's house. "I talked with the romplmy by telephone." Cmrlrrll said. "TtlDy M-rmrd to think thry wrrr in the right, but I told them It was Just plain muto theft In Oklahoma." time in hUrtory. banks In Minnesota have topped the mirk, p. A. Amundion, commissioner of banks, reported last night. For the quarter ended Octo- ber C. he wtld state a savings bank and lour trust companies had totaling more than with deposits gaining In tho past thrno months to a total Of Loans and which the department naid generally reflect increased business octiv-. .Jty, were also at a 20-year high at were up 600 to a aggregate. Mankato T. C. Seeks Eviction Of Six Families St. Paul Raymond Hughes, resident director of tho Munkato Touchers college, here ..Ight court action would bo started Saturday against six fami- lies occupying two apartment build- ing tho school requires for dormi- tory purposes. Hughes, who is also .vice-president of tho state teachers college board, said tho Mankato school had a- qulrcd 42 units last year for student housing and that verbal notices of eviction at tho ntart of tho school year had boon given monthly since last January 1. On July 1 and October 1 ho sold written notices had boon served but that tho six families, embodying nomo 15 persons, had ignored them. Ho said tho collofto meantime had vacated 28 other housing units in Mankato but that those families had made no effort to rent any of thorn. Milwaukee Representative Charles Kcrsten Bald he would return to Washington today and would devote "as much time as necessary" to sending out com- munications izi an effort- to; locate and secure release of an Ameri- can-barn girl .reported to be held as a slave laborer In 'Russian cool mine. Kerstcn told The Associated Press last night ho would contact Poter Ochs, proprietor of a Milwaukee music.store. In an effort to get as much Information as possible about a letter Ochs received from Hungary describing tho girl's plight. Ochs told Tho Associated Press he received a letter about a month ago from a cousin, Henry Ochs, the girl's father. He said Henry and his wife lived in this country about the time of World War I. They lived on a farm "somewhere In Wiscon- sin" for about two years, in Mil- waukee about a year and in Day- ton, Ohio lor some time. He said he was not certain wheth- er the girl was bom In Wisconsin or Ohio. He said she had a brothei also born in America and that al- though the parents wore not na- turalized, the children held citizen- ship by reason of their birth In this country. Ochs said the family returned to Hungary shortly after tho First World war to take over their par- ents' farm, and wore trapped there by World War II. The letter ho received, he said told of all persons in the village between IS and 30 being told to re- port lor a labor battalion nnd tho American-born girl being taken Into Russia with others. Kerstcn said ho planned to cable American diplomatic officials In Hungary about tho caso and also contact representatives of tho Rus siun government. Parking Meter System Starts at'Faribault Furlbault motor' Ists will start paying for parking in tho downtown area late today fol- lowing official final publication of tho new ordinance authorizing the motor Installation, No Word ot Mikolajczyk, British Say London British officials said today no word had been received of the whereabouts of Staniulaw Mikolajczyk ulnco ho disappeared from Warsaw 11 days ago and they expressed concern for his safety. Rumors that the Polish oppo- sition leader had reached Den- 'mark. Sweden, the British zone of Germany, or even that he was on his way to the United States, all lacked confirmation. Mikolajczyk's wife, who has been in England ever since he returned to Poland from war- time duties In London to par- ticipate in the formation ot provisional government of na- tional unity, said she had re- ceived no word from him. IL S. Readies Palestine Report Socialists Avert Gasoline Defeat by Less Than 30 Votes London Britain's Labor government averted defeat by less than 30 votes on two occasions In the House of Commons narrowest margins it has had since the party came to power in August, 1015. By a count of 184 to IflO, the Labor majority approved a hotly argued motion to end debate on a controversial government proposal to abolish the slim basic gasoline ration now alloted to British motor- ists. The Conservative opposition greeted the vote with shouts of "gag" and "resign, resign." Vote 187 to 160 A few moments later the House defeated, 187 to 160, on opposition motion to annul the government order wiping out the basic gasoline ration. The closeness of the votes was By lluiiok Lake American delegation today was putting the final touches to its long-awaited u.-1-i-------- proposals on Implementing the par- rnomlng, when Kittredge telephoned 'titlon ot Palestine1 into independent the Cornett home to ask when the party would arrive. Within a short time the states greatest search for a missing plane was under way, Cattleman Reports Merle Lowden, supervisor of the Fremont National forest and dl- Jewish and Arab countries. Drafted by State department ex- perts after lengthy consultations with Secretary of State George Marshall and his top aides, the plan will be offered to a United Nation partition subcommittee by Dele- rector of parties' In the the ground searching area, reported a w..v. call- Irom George Hill, ai ttleman In the lonely country near the crash, first directed air search- ers over tho Dog Lake mountain where the plane was sighted. Cleveland's Widow Dead Mrs. Thomas J. Preston. Baltimore, Thomas Jcx Preston, Jr., 83, widow ot Presi- dent Grover Cleveland, died unex- pectedly here Wednesday at the home of her son, Richard P. Clove- land. Cleveland, Baltimore attorney and civic leader, said his mother liad come to Baltimore from her home in Princeton. N. J., to help him cele- brate his 50th birthday. Tuesday night she Joined In a quiet family party at the Cleveland home. She died about noon while sleeping, her son said. Mrs. Preston married President IMI S. Jri due partly to Labor abstentions nnd at tne white House when to the ballot came lnlshe was 22 and he was 49. Five tho early hours of the morning afteriyears after Mr. Cleveland's death but, 4-V.A tnno moi-Hnn T.n TTlfiTttm; ft night reduced the attendance generally. The Labor party has scats and tho Con-, dorvatlvow These votes followed by only a few hours Winston Churchill's fourth unsuccessful effort to throw the Labor party out of office by adverse parliamentary ballot. The House defeated his attempt lost night, 384 to 201. His previous at- tempts failed. 381 to 197 In 1945, 374 to 198 last April; and 251 to 148 last August. Million Petition The debate on the gasoline Issue, on which an adverse vote might in 1908, she was married to Thomas Jex Preston, Jr., a retired professor of archaeology. Tho nvo children Ruin, who died in childhood; Mrs W. S. B. Bosanquet of Rcdcar, York- shire county, England; Mrs, John H. Amen, New York city; Richard F. Cleveland, Baltimore, and Fran- cis Q. Cleveland, Tamworth, N. H. Funeral services and burial will be conducted privately Friday In Princeton. gate HerscUel V. Johnson. ut government In a po- policy declaration will cover Amer1-lotion where lt would have can how and by .whom the 51UU" _ Holy Land should be administered for an Interim period preceding lull Independence. A spokesman said Johnson would make, the speech by the end of the T, JllHIkl? Ullli Lowden Hill had been waiting for the United turbed Tuesday night by the sound States to show Its hand first, was of a distressed aircraft near his iso- to follow immediately with lated cabin.. He attempted late that Sovlet version of how partition, night to use a forest service tele- phono but there was no response to Ills ringing over the single wire Youngdahl Condolences St. Luth- er W. Young-donl today sent the following telegram to Mra. Earl Snell, wife of the governor of Orejon: "The people of Minnesota are shocked and grieved by the loss of Oregon's distinguished gov- ernor. I came to know him at the governors' conference In Utah anil rcnpeotcrt alilllty. Integrity and outstanding puWlo service." If finally voted by the U.N., should bo enforced. American sources maintained their usual secrecy on matters sur- rounding the Palestine question, but it was understood that Marshall was considering, among other ideas, the reported Soviet scheme that the Holy Land be placed under the su- pervision of the security council v Interim for the year-or-longei Interim, djsousslon to go forward period. It was considered virtually opinlon to develop. I certain that, Marshall would guard I cannot feel that the state- omr COH.1- circuit linking Isolated ranger sta- tions. Later yesterday, his efforts brought an answer from a north- ern California forest station. Low- den said Hill had no radio and consequently did not know of the news that the governor's plane was missing. Swath Cut forced to resign, devcloed a few hours after messengers carried into the House of Commons a petition betrlng more than 000 signa- tures protesting against abolition of the gasoline.ration. Hugh Gaitskell, newly appointed minister of fuel and power, said the decision to abolish the basic ration was taken as "an essential slop in the balance of payments, to save foreign currency In general and dollars in particular." Ho said It would mean a saving of Churchill Protests Churchill immediately seized up- on tho issue and bounced to his feet with the declaration that: "These are very large questions, It would be very much better to Democrats Also Pick Philadelphia NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS in tho past It has boon the custom of The Republican-Herald display advertising department to accept copy for insertion any time on tho day previous to publication, and even occa- nlormlly early in tho morning on tho day of publication, when emergency required It. However, present circumstances make It'an impossibility to continue thla service, and it has become necessary to estab- lish nn earlier "deadline" in order to insure tho issuance of Tho Republican-Herald to its moro than subscribers ON TIME each afternoon. Accordingly, effective at once, the display department will bo able to accept advertisements for any issue only up to In tho afternoon of tho day preceding publication. Large-sized advertisements will necessarily have to ba earlier than that, but In no caso will Tho Republican-Herald guarantee publi- cation of copy received later than the time indicated p. m. for the next tame. The cooperation ot all mcrOiants and, other advertisers wilt Bo appreciated. Winonu Hrpnblirun-y rralfi Tho two pilots who sighted tho wreckage, Robert Adams and Greg Painter of Lokevlew, Ore., were fly- ing one of a score of planes from four states that circled the area in the afternoon. They spotted the unaltered craft through a break in tho ovurca.it and flew at trcetop level to establish identification by the numbers. A swath had been cut through the forest the small plane struck. and tho pilots reported 'no of life. The pluno In HO badly dam- aged that no one could be alive." The crash was the third within a week to shock the nation. Last Friday a United Airlines plane crashed In Bryce Canyon, Utah, carrying 52 persons ta their death. Search parties are still hunting for a trace of a Pan-American air- ways craft that disappeared Sunday with 18 persons aboard en route to Juncau, Alaska. Snell became governor after serving in the house from 1927 to 1933, when he was elected speaker. He was elected secretary of state in 1934, re-elected in 1038 and be- came governor in 1942 and was re- elected by the greatest plural ty ever given an Oregon gubernatorial candidate. Mrs. F. R. Bid to Wedding New secretary for Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt said to- day tho widow of the lato President had declined a formal invitation from the British royal family to at- tend the wedding November 20 of Princess Elizabeth and Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten. Mrs. Roosevelt replied that slie would be unablo to BO to London because of tho press of her official duties as a member of the united States delegation to the United Na- tions, the secretary said, The Invitation was received and answered last week. against making any outright com- mitment of American troops. Stolen in Boston gunmen held up the B P. Stuvtcvant, Company in the Hyde park district today, es- caping with payroll. The Sturtovnnt company is a di- vision of the Westlnghouse Electric Corporation. Working methodically, two of the men entered the office of R. W. Marshall, paymaster, nnd two others went into nn adjoining office. A rift'i stood at a door leading into the factory, nnd the sixth remained at the wheel' of the get-away car. U.S. Protests Soviet Oil Seizure London (fP) The United States and Britain have pro- tested to Russia directly against Soviet sciJ-.ure of tho rlcli Loteu oil flcIclK and In Auxlrlii. A British forciini office spokes- man, confirming- today reports that the two countries had sent separate notes of protest to said they followed two futile oral protests to Russian authorities in Vienna, ment of Mr. Galtskell, however glib and sweeping and logical it nmy appear to be, is an answer to the difficulties wo have in this prac- tical question of how to meet the difficulties of our dollar situation, Chutcr Edo, deputy leader of the House, said he saw no reason why the debate should be continued and offered his motion to end Stassen Wants Rights Guarded in Probes Lone Beach, Calif. E Stnsscn advocates "moro Judicial safeguards of civil liberties in In- vestigation procedures." The former Minnesota governor and candidate for the Republican presidential nomination made Ms point in answer to a question which followed his address to the commu- Inlty forum last nlRht. Government Offers Frozen Egg Stores agriculture department announced Wednesday It will put its holdings Of pounds of frosscn whole eggs on the market for domestic use. It will receive offers on Tuesday of eacli week, beginning November 4, until further notice. Frozen whole effgs nrc used prin- cipally by bakers and other food processors. The'' 'Demo- cratlc party as represented by Its national committee gave evidence today that It has settled Just about everything for Its 1948 convention except -who Is to run lor vice-presi- dent. At a one-day meeting yesterdaj' the committee unanimously picked Philadelphia lor next summer's nominating conclave and elected In 43-year-old Senator J. Howard Me- Grath of Rhode Island a new na- tional chairman who favors non- partisan action on emergency legis- lation at the November 17 special session of Congress. Philadelphia had been earlier picked by the Re- publicans for their convention. The 108-member group also ap- plauded a statement by rctlrln( Chairman Robert E. Hanncgan praising President Truman and as- serting millions of Americans are calling for him "to stay at the helm." Vice-presidential talk was inform- al and scarce. Most members said it Is too early to think about the No. 2 spot. But names heard Included those, of Sec- retory of Defense James V. Forres- tal. a New Yorker; Supremo Cour Justice William O. Douglas, of Washington state and Connecticut: Governor Mon C. Wallgren of Washington, and Governor William Preston Lane, Jr.. of Maryland. General Farrand Weds Illinois Woman Dclnflcld, Wls. Brigadier General Roy Farrand, 73, prcsiden of St. John's Military academy, and Mrs. Nlta Smith Wnlker, 07, of Pe- orla, 111., were married In a private ceremony tills morning at St. Paul's Episcopal church In Pcoria. Negligence Cited in Island Queen Blast St Investigator's, report today attributed negligence by the chief engineer for an ex- plosion and fire aboard the excur- sion steamer Island Queen that cost; 19 lives September 9 at Pitts- burgh, Pa. Secretary Returns to Washington Outline Shaped for Study of Special Session By .Tolin M. nlnhlower Washington rr jeorgo Marshall returns to his State department desk today to ,akc a leading role In shaping final recommendations to Congress for a four-year European recovery pro- gram that may cost UP to The program hn and other top administration arc due to turn out within .next week 1m expected to be laid before con- gressional committees November 10 the argument that it "reasonable" chance of (1) Sav- Europe from economic disaster and (2) Preventing a vast westward extension of Russian communism. Marshall returned late Wednes- day from New York where he made Ms headquarters for the past six weeks personally directing American diplomatic offensive In the United Nations assembly. Officials sold that despite Mar- shall's close attention to United Nations affairs In New York. :ias kept himself fully Informed of European recovery planning along the self-help lines he him- self suggested last June. Broad Plan Outlined Actually diplomatic and economio officials say that while almost no final decisions hnvo been made, broad outlines ot tho "Marshall plan" already are well .laid down. In general and subject to last mln- uto changes they cover these main points to be laid before when the special session opens No- vember 17: 1. United States would. available to Europe next year combination of relief and recovery supplies totaling about 000. Relief supplies such food would bo given, free. Recovery pUes': as factory machinery would, be financed with loam. 3. Beyond-the first year and sibly the cecond.lt will ImpoMl- Mo., to. forecast accurately amount' of help Europe will because of changing Congress thus would be asked each year for only the next year's funds, these to be based on constantly revised estimates, Succen Uncertain 3. As proposed by the European nations themselves, the sums from tho United would decreoM each year as recovery progress warn made. Both American and European, officials would try to make certain. who fell oversea, in World successful recovery at the end four years. But administration. authorities are prepared to ac- knowledge that success con not guaranteed. and to argue that risk of doing nothing is Ereoter than the risk of failure. 4. In addition to American gov- ernment financing the plans call for some reconstruction loans from tho World bank. There Is also considerable hope here that other countries, such as Canada and Ar- gentina, might help with their own. financing to permit Europe to buy needed products from them. Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS For Winona and cloudy tonight and Friday. Not much change in temperature. Low tonight 47; high Friday 64. Minnesota: Mostly cloudy and Friday with scattered local showers tonight. Cooler northwest and extreme north Friday. Wisconsin: Mostly cloudy tonight and Friday. A little warmer wltli scattered showers west Friday. 1OCAT. AVEATinSR Official observations for the 14 hours ending at 12 m. today; Maximum, 52; minimum. 48; noon. 52; precipitation, none; sun to- night at sun rises tomorrow G-.40. TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Free, Bcmidjl ............50 DCS Moincs ........50 Duluth.............44 Kansas City .......69 Los Angeles........68 Miami .............81 Mpls.-St. Paul.....52 New Orleans ___. 80 New 71 Phoenix............85 DAILY RIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-Hr. Stage Today 43 48 41 48 56 68 46 67 53 52 .03 .08 ,01 T T .01 Red Wing....... 14 Lake City......... Reads 12 Dam 4, T.W. Dam 5. T.W. Dam 5A, T.W. Winona 3 Dam 6. T.W. Dakota Dam 7, T.W. La Crosss 32 6.3 3.4 45 2.4 3.2 5.4 X4J2 7.6 1.5 4.6 Tributary Streams Chippewa at Durand 2.0 Zumbro at Theilman Buffalo above Alma 2.3 2.2 .1 J 3, .2 .1 Trempcalcau at Dodge 13 Black at Neillsville 3.2 i Black at Galcsville 2.7 3, La Crosse at W. Salem 1.8 -i- .1 Root at Houston. .....53 J. RIVER FORECAST (From to Guttcnbcrg-, lowm) Unless heavy rains occur, theru will be practically no change in tha river stages in this district over weekend.   

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