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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, October 23, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 23, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER lonllhl nd curly innltnued flouL. C Full Wire New. Report of The Associated Member of the Audit Bureau of W1NONA. MINNESOTA. THURSDAY EVENING. OCTOBER 23. 1947 ONTRIBUTE To Wlnona's Community Chest TWENTY PAGES VOLUME 47. NO. Truman Calls Work of Film Reds Minimized Only Stir Up Accomplish Little, Testify Wmshlnitton Three Holly- wood stars told Congress members today that communists are active In the film capital, but accomplish lit- tle except to create disturbances. Actor Robert Montgomery called the communists "n small minority" who have never succeeded In domi- nating the actors, But they create disturbances far greater than thcilr numbers, he said. Actor George Murphy had much the same story for the House com- miurc on un-American activities, now in it.i fourth day of hearings on communism In Hollywood. Ho estimated 'than one per cent" or the screen actors guild tiro communists, but they cause "con- stant irritation." Ronflld Reagan agreed. Ho said the communists have tried to mus- cle in" on the movie Industry and disrupt it but have not succeeded, SSgkn 1.1 president of the Screen Actors guild. A big KlKh went up from a Jam- packed audience, largely fcmlnino, when Montgomery took the He followed two screen writers to the stand. Fred Niblo, Jr.. and Richard Macaulay who both testi- fied they believe communistic influ- ence exists among tho writing pro- iC wwie certainly the most promin- ent Actor Robert Taylor was only of several witnesses yesterday James K. McGulnness. Metre Goldwyn-Maycr executive, said ten OTIS leading Hollywood writers arc Rushmorc of HunUngton N Y.. who described himself as a lo'nner communist and now an edi- torial worker for the New York Journal American, named John Howard Lawson. movlo writer, ns tt. man who was "in cllwot charge of communist activities In Holly- VTa'ylor tcstlrtcd for 2S minutes. He said that tho actions or some nctors and actresses Indicated to him that "if they were not corn- SSnJS thty were working awfully hard to be one." Taylor told tho Taft Will Announce Candidacy, Friends Say committee he wanted to correct a widely hold im- prMslon that ho had been pressured into plavlng tho Iracl role in bong of JlSwia." produced at the ou set or the. war. He didn't likei ho play, hf r.nld. because ho thought It con- tained pro-RujiMnn propaganda nnfl he mnnwd to havo some changes in tho original script. But no one forced him to star in It hr mild, bcciuiso Btaw cannot be forc.rd Into any picture. Transcontinental Dobnte A transcontinental debate along the ccncral line of "You're a reel- No I'm not" developed in connec- tion with the House Investigation of communist influences In Holly- Witnesses before the committee on un-American activities in Wash- ington have waggled accusing fin- errs at Hollywood personages. Many of the Hollywood notables have Issued denials from Hollywood, Producer-Director Sam Wood said n "tight, disciplined group" of communists and party liners sought to control Hollywood unions. The Screen Directors Oulld tele- graphed Washington saying it "feels colled upon to deny" Wood's testi- mony and "it is our considered belief that Ms remarks are without foundation." Film Critic John C. Moffltt al- leged that Chalmers (Slick) Good- lin former test pilot of a Bell Air- craft-built army rocket plane, was tricked by Literary Agent John into revealing supersonic bomc-tr secrets which were then passed along to communists by Weber. Goodlin, at Rosamond, Cnllf., where he's writing a novel, said It's "silly and without foundation." Weber said it was "malicious in- vention and and Hint he knew less about what Goodlin was doing thnn the man in the street. Protest In Advertisements Hollywood notables grouped a: Committee for the First Amendment" bought page adver- tisements in trade papers asserting they were "disgusted and outraged' by 'the Washington hullabaloo and describing It as an "attempt to curb freedom of expression and to sot arbitrary standards of American- ism." Signers Included Eddie Cantor, Norman Corwin. Henry Fonda. Ava Gardner, Puuleur Ooddurd. Denny Goodman. Vim Hcflln. Paul Hcn- rrtd, Kiilhnrme lls'pburn, Myrna Dorothy McCJulrc, Gregory Prck, Cornel Wlldo and Norman Krusnn. Tnc Progressive Citizens or Amer- ica supported Paul V. McNutt'f demand that the Washington com- mittee list tho films It terms "sub- versive." Superior Man Deer Violations Superior. Win. Frank J Brlllno plfiitlpcl (Uillty to a charger Minister A Reynolds D.R. Saw Of Minnesota P.-T.A.Wxr in '38, Hurry M. HeynoltU St. Paul, ry M. Reynolds, 7C4 West Broadway, Wlnona, was elected president of tho Minnesota Congress of Parents and Teachers at the 25th anniversary convention here today. He Is the first man to be elected, to this office in Minnesota. Women1 had held the office before. Mr. Reynolds has been active in P.-.T. A. work'for 12 years. He has been serving as chairman of tho resolutions committee for several years. He has been on the state board of managers for six years. In the past he has served as local and district president of the P.-T. A. Mr. Reynolds studied at Grinnell college, Iowa, and did graduate work at Iowa State university. He served an Instructor nt Allcghany college, Pa. Ho is a former member of the Wlnona Board of Education. He is married and has one son. _______ Can't Cut Taxes And Send Full Aid, Knutson Declares Washington Harold Knutson (R.-MInn.) said to- day there isn't enough money in the federal till "to finance both the Marshall plan and a tax cut." But the chairman of the tax- writing House ways and means com- mittee told a reporter he believes Congress will limit its Md-to-Europe contribution under tho Marshall program next year to "It certainly should not exceed that Knutson said, reiter- ating his determination to Introduce a third tax cutting bill as soon ns Congress reconvenes, whether in special or regular session. Slmllnr to Old BUN Tho bill, ho nalcl, will be similar to tho two President Truman vetoed earlier thld year. Those measures would havo trimmed levies by from 30 per cent in low income brackets to 10.6 PC? cent In the top brackets. Each would have re- duced taxes by a total of about a year. Tho Mlnnesotan predicted his new bill would pass "by enough votes to put It Into law over any possible presidential veto." "If government spending is kept on the present lcvcl-or matcly can't havo both_ the Marshall plan and a tax cut bill, Knutson asserted. Fantastic1 only way that could be ac- complished would be for the ad- ministration to chop expenses drastically. That is not likely. Speaking Tour Expected to Follow Friday Satement By Jack Bell said to- day that Senator Robert A. Taft will formally announce his active candidacy tomorrow for the Repub- lican presidential nomination.. This- will place the 58-year-old Ohloan who heads his party's policy committee in the. Senate in a race that already has drawn the formal entry of former Governor Harold E, Stasscn of Minnesota and probably will have several other participants, Including Governor Thomas E, Dewey of New York. Taffs announcement will be made in a Jotter to the Ohio state Re- publican committee.. It will put him in a position to begin an active drive for the 547 .delegates neces- sary to win the nomination nt next June's G.O.P. convention in Phila- delphia. Tour Expected for the next several years is fantastic and out of tho Question. "I think this country should try to supply enough emergency aid to Europo to see them through this winter, be sure they have enough seed for the spring planting give them a paddle and then tell them 'go paddle your own canoe.' Austin Answers Vishinsky Attack The senator is expected to supple- ment his letter with the announce- ment of. a speaking tour through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Ark- ansas and possibly Texas. In an uarller western Kwing Taft has criticized the administration's foreign policy as "a riot of incon- complaining that neither tho people nor Congress know whether .this country Is being led toward war. Nevertheless, Taft has announced his support of plans for extending economic aid to Europe and counseled retaining the bipartisan foreign policy backed by his friend- ly co-loader in the Senate, Arthur Vandcnberg Challenges Union Leaders On the domestic front, Taft has challenged union leaders to moke an issue of the act in the 1948 campaign. He also has depleted the hig] cost'or which ho and Mr Truman have had some hot likely to become one of the chief issues In next year's elections. The senator has blamed Mr. Truman for creating many of id to in- Probe Told Perkins, Woodring Fought Preparation, Witness Declares A. John- son, former assistant secretary of war, said today that "he and Presi- dent Roosevelt knew as early as 1938 "that war was "coming and we could not stay out of it." Johnson, who served as assistant secretary from 1037 until 1840, testi- fied before tho Senate war Investi- gating committee which is trying to Icarn why a detailed Industrial mobilization plan was discarded aft- er Pearl Harbor. At first Johnson asked that his account of prewar moves Jn con- nection with the late President be "off the but Chairman Brewster (R.-Malne) said the testi- mony should be open to the public. Block Efforts Johnson said that his efforts to prepare this country for war were blocked by two former cabinet mem- burs _ former Secretary of Labor Perkins and former Secretnry of "War Woodring and General Brehon wartime chief of the army's supply service. Johnson said that a detailed in- dustrial mobilization plan "was ditched by brass hats because it did not suit tho program of General Somervell." He also said that Secretary of De- fense James Forrestal had made "incorrect1 'and "inexact" statements about the reason for shelving the time, Johnson testified, Somervell "even planned to get rid of General Marshall." He referred to George Marshall, then army chief of staff and tho now secretary of state. Forrcstal Testimony Forrcstal testified yesterday that the long-studied program for mus- tering America's Industrial might was "toq generalized.'? Before the hearing opened, there was another exchange' between Sen- ator Breweter and Sena- tor Pepper who have clashed repeatedly over the current Brewstor suggested in an inter- view it would be good idea for Con- gress to draw up mobilization laws in peacetime In order to be well pro- pared for any new conflict. But Senator Popper denounced the proposal, .Baying: "I am not in favor of setting up all the machinery for war when wo arc trying to keep tho peace." Auto Association Favors School Driver Training SI Paul The Minnesota State Automobile association today was on record for the training of drivers in high schools to cut the Tuft and Stasscn have said some nice things about each other re- cently, but both have denied any working agreement such as might be aimed at "stopping" Dewey in the early convention balloting. By Max Hiirrelson Lake Success The United States today assailed Russia's at- tempt to curb alleged "warmongers in this country as a move for "applying shackles" to the minds of the American people. U S Delegate Warren R. Austin declared that the Soviet resolution "would put shackles on tho brain of man as well as a gag In his Austin spoke before the 57-rnem- bor political committee of tho United Nations assembly after Brigadier General Carlos P, Romulo of the Philippines hud called the Soviet measure a "hy- dra-headed monster" inspired by un angry and spiteful Austin replied to ysterday's at- tack by Andrei Vishinsky, Soviet chief delegate, against former Sec- retary of State James P. Byrnes by saying that Vishinsky had given "n grossly distorted Idea" of Byrnes' beliefs. _____________ British Navy May Be Cut to of illrpiil po.wsslon of vcntnon and six chaws of IllpKiil cicL-r hunting brTorc Municipal Judge Claude1 Cooper yrstcrday after front qunr- ur.s of deer found In Bolllno's, S600 bond and deferred sentencing until Saturday. V. Alexander announced today that tho manpower or Britain's navy will bo reduced to men by next March below pre- vious naval estimates, Despite tho reduction, ho told the Cpoper plnccd Belllno under House of Commons, "the Mediterra- r .___., Xninrr Vlr- ncan flcec Is being maintained vir- tually at full strength." Praising the nual meeting at its an- Wcdnesday for its help in raising Minnesota to a high notch in national highway safety records, Governor Luther Young- dahl sparked the education cam- paign by declaring "I hope soon to sec driver training made n credit course in every high school In the Such "behind the whuel" Instruc- tion, he said, would accomplish more than anything else in saving lives on the open road. Tnc Driver Of This truck escaped without injury when it rolled C1 afvua .7 a. m. today. The small poles risng the concrete, was Police were Henthorne said he believed the truck rolled over once, (Republican-Herald Photo1.) Truman Reviews Foreign Relief With Cabinet, Congress Leaders horn- and 35 minute congressional loaders. nan reviewed the European economic crisis today at a two which laid the groundwork lor his afternoon meeting with with, the President, were more Mr. Truman Ramadier Cuts Cabinet to 13 Paul Raina- __ cllcr said today his newly stremn-lmlght orcach an agreement on the came President. Emergency aid for dollar-short western European nations was the foremost problem under considera- tion by administration officials. There was speculation whether Mr. Truman and tho legislators lined cabinet had found it neces- sary to consult the parliament con- cerning the "danger to the repub- lic" which ho said was inherent in and DC Gaulllst the communist ideologies.' The'government yesterday called the parliament to n session starting next Tuesday, though it had not been scheduled to end its summer vacation until November 13. Ramadler told a news conference today the political "climate of France, which has suffered too long, is charged with electricity. Nerves are on edge." In this situation, he said, labor movements arc "being transformed into political'movements." He add- ed, "The objective of these move- ments is the collapse of French au- thority and" the halting of French production." DC Gaulle Angle "On the other he said, "there is another diametrically op- posed political agitation which is aimed nt overthrowing the political foundations with which the people have endowed themselves. The premier, who yesterday purg- ed his coalition cabinet of ministers suspected of having leanings toward General Charles de Gaulle, said both these forces are "attacking the republic at the very moment when union is needed." "There is the clanger the govern- ment must he declared. "In such a grave moment, the gov ernment feels it must consult parliament." De Gaulle has criticized the con- stitution of the fourth French re- advisibillty of a special session of Congress to provide stop-gap aid. House Majority .Leader Charles Halleck before the White House meeting in the afternoon told reporters: 'Wo have gone along -with tho President on everything so far In the foreign aid situation. "I havo said before, however, and still believe, that jueoplc must bo informed on the situation. There will be no writing blank checks." High government officials indi- cated the chief executive had two alternative courses to follow at the extraordinary White House confer- ence. 1. He could suggest special session of Congress in Decem- ber to appropriate funds to tide over such hard pressed-nations as Franco and Italy until next year's regular session has time to 'act on the long-range Mar- shall Plan for European re- covery. 2. Or he could propose that the government proceed to use at once some funds not orig- inally intended for European assistance but which might legally be diverted to that pur- pose. CCC Resources In this connection it was learned that lawyers of the State, Agri- cuUure and Treasury departments week public, adopted by referendum Oc- tober 13, 1346, on the ground that it elves too much power to the e> this week Iran Turns Down Russian Oil Deal TcJiran, Iran Premier Ah- med Qimvnm's oil agreement with the Russians was a dead letter to- day, voided by the Iranian rnajlls Over Quavom's protest, parliament yesterday passed, 102 to two. n. reso- lution nullifying the understanding the premier reached with Soviet Ambassador Ivan Sodchikov in AIUnder this agreement, the Soviet union would have been allowed to explore five northern Iranian prov- Azerbaijan for Parliament instructed the gov- ernment to undertake oil explora- tion of the north through its own agencies and, In the event Petroleum was found, then to discuss its sale to the Soviet union. Last September 10, Quavams as- sociates said Sadchikov had told the premier Russia would .consider Iran a "bitter blood enemy" Jf par- liiwneiJt'dld not approve the agree- mThc next day, U. S. ambassador George V. Allen said in an address here that Iranians "may rest assured that the American people will sup- port fully their freedom to make their own choice." To Consider Prices and Foreign Aid Can't Walt Until January, President Tru- man today called Congress bade .nto session November 17 to con- sider the rising price situation and the European economic plight. Announcing his action, he told a news conference the crisis in Europo is so grave that he could not wals until January to seek legislation. Congress Is regularly scheduled to meet in January. Mr. Tmmnn said he had the same announcement, glvins ,lic same reasons, to congressional cnders at a conference Immediately preceding Ills meeting with news reporters. Prior to the session with congressional group, he had called his cabinet to the White House for an extraordinary session. "It is urgently necessary for tha Congress to take legislative action designed to put an end to the con- tinued rise in prices, which is caus- ing hardship to millions of Amer- icsn families and endangering tha prosperity and welfare of the entire the President said in. a statement. Britain Will Reduce Imports banned to- bacco imports from the United States today and announced new cuts in food imports as the gov- ernment warned that economic col- ;apse would probably mean the end of British democracy. The new minister of economic fairs, Sir Stafford Cripps, reviewing in the House of Commons Britain's economic crisis, announced at same time n. cut of year in government and private ex- penditures lor new homes, new fac- tories, and new plant machinery. He predicted an even deeper aus- terity for the British people. Sir Staflorci declared Britain would sacrifice some imperial pref- erence in exchange for lower U. 3. tariffs. The nation's r.cw economics boss said1 the British immediately must decide to import less from tho United States and export mora goods to fend off collapse. Saving "If our economy and that of Eu- rope should lie said, "our democracy In nil probability will collapse loo and will disappear, and with it will go the last su-ongbold of western democratic civilization in Europe. "Con wo discipline ourselves to the task before us or arc we to invite the harsh discipline or events to Impose some tragic solu- tion upon "We have stopped all purchases of, U S. tobacco until further decision." the economics minister said. Views Differ On Farm Program Tcrre Haute, Ind. Clashing views on the government's proper relation to agriculture were voiced resources might be used on a short term basis to send food to Europe. hard fact The one seemingly which stood out in information gathered informally from officials Mr. Truman on the current V j ItQVloUJb AVAL. Ai. WAA legislature and. too little to is that the money which executive. Cabinet Reduced jthus far has been made available Mlntcry Grand Champion steer of tho American Royal livestock at Kansas City. Mo., was auctioned last night lor a pound of the can-Herald.) City meat concern. 
                            

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