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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: September 29, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 29, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w BATHER Cluarlnr vrtth frovi tontfhl; unit not PO eool In the afternoon. Full Leased Wire Report of The Associated Press 12 Days to Register for Swimming Pool Election NOT. X Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. !89 WJNONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 29, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES 115 Firemen Hurt in N. Y. Harbor Fire Aid to Europe Tied to Special Session w w I. White House Announcement Awaited Congressmen Evade Questions of Reporters Washington Senator Scott Lucas (D.-I1I.) reported today that] President Trumnn told congressional leaders there is no way to give emergency aid to Europe without a special session of Congress this fall. LUCHA made that statement to re- porters as he left a White House conference on the problem of aid to Europe. The senator was asked whether that was the mutual opinion of the White House gathering, "Thr President told us Lu-j cos replied. Representative Hallcck majority leader of the house, when reporters asked whether there had bfen a meeting of minds, said there hud been nn "exchange of Senator Vanclcnbcrg France Asks U.S. to Drop Balkan Charges presiding officer of the Senate, de- clined to discuss the high policy conference which last two and one- half hours. "We are going to let tho Presi- dent tell about Vnndenbcrg sold. Earlier, while tho conference was RolnK on. Presidential Secretary CruwlM a. ROM httd advised news- men that there would bo a White House statement nomo time during the afternoon on the results of the meeting. told a reporter that "there no way to get money without con- gressional action." He that tho committees will be called back, adding, ho meant the- appropriations committees of the House and The Ullnols nenator said there had been "considerable discussion" of the needed. Truman Takes Over Baptist Sunday School Washington President Truman took one of'his morn- Ing walks yesterday and wound up addressing a Sunday school class. Accompanied by a secret service man. Mr. Truman pop- ped In nt promotion exercises for children of the First Baptist church, eight blocks from White House. Dr. Edward Hughes Prudon, tho pastor, said he was taken wan thinking of tho that the Presi- dent told him ho was glad the children wero thAe. "I'm crazy about Dr. Prudcn quoted Mr. Truman. At tho minister's Invitation tho President spoke to tho Sun- day school, tolling tho young- sters "You are studying the morals that will keep this coun- try great." He stayed for Dr. Prudcn'a sermon which followed. Compromise Sought Between American, Russian Positions Ohio Club Holdup Nets band of U masked bandits bearing machine guns early today robbed the exclu- sive Mounds club near and 250 club patronn of Jew- elry and furn worth an estimated S200.000, Sheriff James Maloney re- ported. Sheriff's Deputies Edward Cook nnd Clarence Arnn sftld club ofn- riftlit gave the preliminary estimate of cash and jewelry taken from gambling tnblM and patrorui, who initially thought tho hold up was "part of the floor chow." Weather Man Drowns Near Grand Marais As Seaplane Tips Grand MamU, Dnlbcc, 23. drowned in Luke Su- perior today as high winds and waves upset tho seaplane in which ho was a passenger. Dalbcc and Emerson Morris, 27- year-old owner of the plane, had started out for South Fowl 35 miles cast of hero in Canada on a duck hunting trip. Morris taxied tho ship out of tho harbor but found Lako Superior rough that a was impossible. He un- dertook to turn around and return to the shelter of the harbor. An the piano turned, the wind ship and caused It over. Dnlbcc nnd Morris, climbed from the plane. Morris succeeded in climbing to a pontoon. Dalbcc, not a good swimmer, was unable to get to the plane as the wind kept Blowing it away from him. Members of a logging crew put out In n boat and rescued Morris. Dalbcc .sank in 200 feet of water, Tho body was not recovered. Lake Prance called on the United .States today to with- draw demands that the United Na- tions assembly find three Soviet Balkan satellites guilty of aggres- sion against Greece. In -an avowed attempt to com- promise the fight between Russia and the United States over the Balkan problem, French Minister of State Yvonne Delbos also appeal- ed- to the Soviet union, and Its atcllitcs to cooperate toward seek- ng a peaceful settlement, Dulbos spoke before tho assem- ly's 55-natlon political committee iftor hearing Greece's Deputy 'rcmicr Constantino Tsaldarls de- lare Greece's northern Mbanla, Bulgaria and re boldly committing "acts of ag- gression" while the U. N. seeks a olution. Delbos announced he sub- mitting a proposal to tone down the Jnlted States demands for a finding of guilt. At the same time, he said Prance was ready to support the United States plan for a special assembly commission to watch over the Balkan situation. Tsaldarls charged that the rep resentatlvcs of the Soviet bloc hai not denied that they were sendlni aid to guerrilla fighters, bu instead had resorted to evasion am delaying tactics in an effort to be cloud the Issue. U. S. Ship Hits Mine Near Trieste 3 Killed; 12 Hurt; Sister Destroyer Sent to Aid Fox Washington -The navy said a mine exploded the U. S. destroyer Douglas H. Pox near Trieste at a. m, (C.S.T.) today, resulting in the death, of three men and injuring 12 others. The blast wrecked 'the steering gear of the late type: warship, flooding nil the after compartments nnd leaving her dead in the water, dispatches reaching the Navy de- partment said. A sister destroyer, the James C. Owens, and two tugs have gone to the aid of the 'Fox which has two doctors and five hospital corps men aboard. Navy officials said the mine may have been nn old one, broken loose from nn area not yet swept clean of them since the war. The ex- plosion occurred 18 miles off Trieste dispatches from that Adriatic port said.- Milwaukee Police Hunt Clues in Ambush Shooting Milwaukee Police today Were searching'-for a person who fired a shotgun blast from ambush early Sunday, wounding 18-year- old Margaret Kraetsch, Tho shooting occurred in the town of Qranvllle and sheriff's dep- uties said tho shot evidently was intended -for someone else. The girl was returning from a dance when she was hit by 23 pet- eta from .the gun. Her condition wait reported fair. Ten Drown, in Spanish Floods After Cloudburst persons drowned today In floods caused by i cloudburst in the Segura river volley. Santomera and Orihucla and i number of small villages were flooded. Reports reaching headquarters said the Fox still was able to, move under her own power, bus that the steering equipment was damaged. Trieste is the former northeast Italian, port city, now Included in the free territory of Trieste created from >an area ceded by Italy at the head of the Adriatic scia. Yugo- slavia borders the territory on the east. Chicagoan Shot After Being Duped by Fortune Teller Chicago A fortune teller promised- '23-year-old: -Mrs.. .Nellie Vullo "take the curse off us so we could be but Instead duped the young mother out of Tugboats Fire-Fighting- apparatus pour streams of water Into the Grace Line pier on the Hudson river nt New York today us lire, estimated as causing damage, is brought under control after a battle of several hours. Fire started on this pier, spread through the waterfront building connecting It with the next pier. One hundred fifteen firemen suffered minor Injuries.   IVs Mot lien 70 f.2 Iju. Fulls -in 2f> Mpls.-St. Puul CO 41 Phrwnlx 102 BO DAILY KIVKU IIDI.LETIN Flood SURO 24-hr StftKo Today Change Rcrt Wine I-iikr City M 2.5 B.3 3.5 4.4 .'ill 10.1 7.C 1.0 Tributary Chipptwii nt Durnncl.. 2.1 2.1 D.im T. w. 5. T. W. Diirn iA, T. W. Wltion.'i i Lmrn c. Pool EHim C. T. W. 'C. I'. Dam 7. Pool 7. T. W. Andresen Ready To 'Present Facts' On Europe's Food Home (IP) Two subcommittees of the Hertcr investigating body on European economic conditions have finished their study of Italy and are leaving for London, where the entire group Is to reassemble this week after a month's look at Eu- rope. Representative Christian. A. Her- ;er (R.-Mass.) left early today for Paris and London. He was to be followed by hJs subcommittee on general economic conditions in [taly, Trieste, Greece and Turkey and another on food shortages. called Jn his official capacity declin- ed to comment on the death, today and said a verdict in the death "has not been disclosed." Larry Gilbertson, Jackson county district attorney, refused to com- ment on the case today, and declar- ed, "We are not giving out Informa- tion on the death." Dr. Robert Krohn of the Krohn Clinic hospital said that Perry had been suffering from a" progressive disease nnd had undergone an oper- ation about six months ago. The physician said Perry had been in poor health for several years. He said that apoplexy would be listed on the certificate as the cause of death. Representative August H.- Andre- sen (R.-Mlnn.) chairman of Her- .01 .01 .01 ter's food shortage investigators and of the House agriculture committee's food shortage subcommittee, said that after visiting ten countries his seven-man group was "ready to present the Congress and the peo- ple a hard, straight i-eport on th facts." He declined to sny what conclu sloivs they had reached after In vestigatlons in England. Prance, Th Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, Den mark, Sweden, Germany, Austri: and Italy. "We will speak out when we ge he promised. Pope Pious XII received Satur day the congressional committee: leaded by Representatives Herter and Andresen. L'Osservntore Ro mivno niild the Pontlir expressed hl lope for the success of their mis- ions in view; of postwar suffering. One-Pound Baby at Owatonna Still Living V- '.i Zumbro nt Thrllmun. nbovr Tremjieuleiiu tit lilurk at 2.1 1..U ,-it W. Sulrm 1.4 ,2 Jioot nt Jlcm.ston ICIVKK rOK (from (o .4 .5 ,1 -t- .51 van Lieutenant William van Alien, right, of East Orange, N. stands with his horse near Outpost No, 5 on tho territorial border near Trieste while Major Mike Gussle signs a receipt for Van Atten and two other U, S. soldiers released by tho Yugoslavs after they had been held In captivity since September? 22. This Is a U. S. army signal corps photo. (A.P. Wirephoto via radio from Rome.) There will no Important rliaiiKr.s In the river stagex for sov- rru! clnyx but upper pool rises are likely is heavy ruins occur by the middle or end of Hie week. Icste Lleutonnnt William to the free zone Saturday after live days In Yugoslav he and tho two O. S. soldluro taken with him .wero "handled wlth-kld gloves" but tluit t.hclr cnptora "kept I'cpoiitl that Rututla was strong und kept pointing out pictures of Tito, Stalin ond Lonln." "They only questlonod us formally Vim Alton said, "when we first got to headquarters In rlano." 'Van Atten, of East Orange, N. J., was picked up by Yugoslav troops last week whllo on mounted patrol duty at a disputed section of the new frontier between tho free ter- ritory and Yugoslavia. Taken with him were Private First Class Glen C. Meyer, Edgeley, N. D., and Pri- vate First Class Earl Hendrlcks, Jr., Arlington, Va. Go- Van; Atten said he could not be certain whether he had crossed the boundary lines, but "even If we. were over it, It was only five or six Tho 24-yoar-old lieutenant said that Yugoslav troops unclrddd them and a Yugoslav officer with whom he had spoken before they accompany him for a short talk'with tils commander about the disputed Owalonna, Minn. A premature baby girl weighing "about a pound" with a head the size of aw orange was alive' today more than ,62 hours after birth. The infant was born at Owa- tonna hospital Friday to 33- year-old Mrs. Warren Gray, wife of a Wa.seca, Minn., ath- letic coach. They have named her Sara Jane. Dr. Lyle V. Berghs, Owatonna, a brother oi Mrs, Gray, said his tiny niece was gaining on her quarter-ounce feedings of breast milk donated by other mothers in the maternity ward. Dr. -Berghs gave the' baby a "good -chance" to survive. The infant was In. an In- cubator with a special -nurse In. attendance. Weighing has been delayed but Dr.'uBerghs said she Was close to a pound." He said she was born three months prematurely. New Methodist Bishop Named For Wisconsin Springfield. Bisho Edwin Holt Hughes of chevy Chose Md., Is the new Methodist bishoj of Wisconsin, succeeding to th post left vacant by the death las month of Bishop Ernest G. Rich ardson: Bishop Richardson had served a; lead of the Wisconsin area for seven months, following the death in China plane crash of Bishop Schus- ler E. Garth. Bishop Hughes, who at 80 Is the denomination's oldest bishop in length of service, was named by the council of bishops Saturday night Retired for a number of years, ho formerly wns president of De Pauw university, Greencastle, Ind. A native of Virginia, he began, his ministry at Newton, Moss.-, in i892. He has served as bishop in San Francisco, Boston, Chicago and Washington. In Wisconsin, -his headquarters will be in. Madison, as were his predecessors. The three are Alvin E. Hall, 21, Oakland, Minn., Stanley C. Rhlgcr, Minn., -and' Harold S. Stoffer, 22. Elko, Minn. The three, were arrested nt a trailer camp here where they had been living recently while working at a Waterloo industrial plant. Sheriff CHrlstenson said he was taking Hall back to Owatonna to- day and would file detainers against Rhiger and Stoffer pending disposi- tion of a case against them in con- nection with the burglary of the American Petroleum Company sta- tion, here September 25, Chrlstenson said Rhiger had ad- mitted a burglary at Alden, Minn., last spring and that'the trio had admitted a garage break-in at Al- iert Lea earlier this month, _ The trio was using a car taken In Min- neapolis during the summer, he said. Deputy Sheriff Floyd Mostain of Waterloo, and Waterloo City De- tectives Emll StelTen, Thomas Wood and Robert Wright originally ar- rested the men who also have been questioned about the robbery of a food market here lost week. Record Tow Leaves Three Barges Here The Alexander Mackenzie, stem- wheel towboat which is pushing the largest tow In history up the Mississippi, arrived at Wlnona early this morning and after leaving thzea aarges of material, Including one jai-go of superphosphate for Northwest Co-Operative "Milta, here, continued uprlver. The craft, which arrived a.t WI- nona about hours later than ynui expected; Is bound for St. Paul with. 11 barges of cool. It started from Alton, 111., with 15 barges, a IdM of tons, and dropped one barge at Genoa, Wis., and three here. It locked through the WI- nona dam at a jn. Heavy fog near Genoa Saturday night is reported to have held up the tow nearly ten hours. Captain Walter Kamath, Wlnona, is to charge of the boat, and Captain Charles white, a veteran towboat pilot, is co-pilot. Ball, Reuther Talk at Ohio Meet Garobier, Ohio Senator Joseph Ball and Victor Reuther, education director of the C.I.O. united Automobile Workers, spoke Saturday at Kcnyon college at a conference on the heritage of English-speaking peoples and their responsibility. Ball called for a "free and fair" labor market, but Reuthcr countered with demands for economic checks and balances "similar in function to those prevailing in the political sphere." The conference probably marked ;hc first time since passage of the Taft-Hartlcy labor measure that a national leader of labor and a con- eree of the bill have spoken from he same stage. S. D. Flier Crashes, Escapes Serious Injury Canton, S. yp) Gllmau Thompson, about 42, a farmer-avia- or, escaped serious injury Sunday vhen his light plane crashed on andinp; as the ship ran out of gas- oline. Witnesses said the plane fell ibout 100 feet.' Attends Conference on Tax Adjustment Edward J. Thye (R.-Minn.) was among those ttendinsr a joint conference Satur- ay of 30 U. S. congressmen and ovcrnors which proposed that there c an "immediate readjustment of he federal-state tax relationship" nd urged "adoption of a five-point axing program, by which states and ocal governments could "assume lose functions which they can ad- minister best." Wedding Shooting Delays Chicago Pair's Honeymoon tragically de- ayed honeymoon began today for ilr. and Mrs. Chester Wasnicwskl, hose wedding reception was trans- oi-med into bedlam Saturday night nhen the bridegroom's brother was hot and seriously wounded during n argument. Stanley Wasnicwskl, 33, shot In 19 left side, was reported in "fairly good" condition at Bridewell hospi- tal, and Police Captain George Homer said the .bride's father, An- thony Buccierl, 55, was being sought for questioning. Homer said Mrs. Harriet Fry, a sister of the Wosniewski brothers, related Buccierl had shot Stanley Wasniowskl in a quarrel concern- ing the food at the reception. The bride, Mary, 23, married Sat- urday morning to Chester Wasnlewski, fainted twice, and several other women guests also fainted, Homer said. The bridal couple was separated for the remainder of their wedding night when- Wasnlewski was taken to the Racine avenue police station for questioning. He was released shortly afterward. Mayor Appeals to Milwaukee Coke Manufacturer coal and natural gas were involved here to- day in controversy carrying over- tones throughout the state. The question affects the piping of natural gas throughout Wisconsin and the problem of heating Milwaukee homes this winter. It arose Saturday when the Mil- waukee Solvay Coke Company, only coke manufacturer in the city7 an- nounced it planned to halt the sale of Its coke to homes for heating; The flrm said it was diverting the coke from household use to a Chi- cago steel mill to speed the manu- facture of pipe to bring natural gas to Milwaukee and Wisconsin. Mayor John Bonn asked the com- pany to rescind the order find two labor leaders termed the firm's ac- tion a "public be damned" attitude. Last night President J. A, B. Lovett said only the possibility of getting steel for the pipe from some other source could have any effect on the diversion plan. He said it was "hoped conditions will make it possible" to bring tho coke back to the domestic market after the flrst of the year. la his appeal to the company. Mayor Bohn said worm homes more important than gas pipe. He asked the firm to "relax its order because the fuel situation in Mil- waukee anc" Wisconsin extreme hardship this winter." Cholera Hits Egypt; Vaccine Rushed by Air of a spreading cholera epidemic gripped the Me- diterranean area today as travel was virtually cut off to and from Egypt, where 140 "suspected." cases of the dread disease have been re- ported to date. Eleven, sufferers died yesterday. British and American planes rushed vaccine and other medical supplies to the stricken country. (Cholera, which has taken many lives In Europe and Asia-In the past, is an acute epidemic disease which often, kills infected persons a. few days after incidence. (The cholera bacterium is carried chiefly by infected persons traveling from place to place. Contaminated water is the principal means of in- fection.)   

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