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Winona Republican Herald: Wednesday, September 24, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 24, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER with front In 16 Days to for Swlmmlne Pool Election Nov. 3 Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO. 85 WINONA, MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 24, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES Nazi Gold Loot to Be Used for Europe Council Ready to Bring Truman Asked Small-Boat Harbor Decision to a Head Inspection of Olmstead Street Site to Be Made Plan.', to brine the decision on the small-boat harbor location to an curly head were mncie by. the city council Tuesday evening. Councllmen will probably meet with the backers of the Olmstead street harbor Thursday evening, win Inspect that site Sunday morning and will hear representatives of the St. Paul district of the army engi- neers next Monday night. The army engineers arc scheduled to be here to discuss the develop- ment of the commercial harbor, but several councllmen suggested last' night that they'd like to ask Two Killed As Tanker Hits Carrier Iroquois, Ont, (IF) At least two men were killed and a number were njurcd- by a collision of the oil ;nnker Translate and the carrier tftlverton about a mile down the St. Lawrence river from Iroquols today. The dead men, both members of the crew of the Milverton, were To Curb Speculation Track Torn Up in Brownsville Wreck Congressional Unit Calls for Raising of Grain Margins By The Associated Press A' congressional subcommittee in- vestigating high living costs as- serted today that speculation was 'supporting food prices at unjus- .Ifiablc levels" and called on Presi- dent Truman to "use every means" o restrain it. The committee, meeting in New York, telegraphed the chief execu- tive that margin requirements on neer F Dtaon f MoneaL The collision was followed by an the engineers about the small-boat explosion aboard the Milverton that harbor, too, licit that vessel still afire at mid- At any rate Council President William Theurer commented, "We're getting to the point where v.-e must make a decision on the location. How about doing it Monday His query drew no response. EnjrlncrM to lie Hero Announcement that morning. jrain exchanges should be raised and that the manner and timing of j governmental food purchases should be studied to minimize their specu- lative effect on prices. Grain Breaks At the same time, grain prices (broke sharply and hog prices and 13 Freight Cars Derailed, 600 Feet of JJ'S; The Translake. holed, partly sank.ibutter and egg futures declined Chief Constable Garnctt in early trading on Chi- ef Iroquois sounded a general alarm siren as soon as the collision was noticed and practically every man In (this town of persons took part Jin rescue clforts. Patrol boats put but the heat be here next Monday came from City Engineer Carl W, Frank who said that the engineer's plans call for development of a harbor about 1.100 feet long. He suggested that u smaller area be developed first and that a conference between the engi- neers and the council would b desirable. The meeting with the Olmsteai street backers war, arranged b Alderman-at-Large Robert Dorsch The fire nnd police board will b Invited to nttend this meeting Alderman Dorsch said that h> desired the meeting to discuss thi procedure in gaining, a street ac cess to the harbor, which is on North Western railway property. He nddcd that Raining of thts iicccn, ir. tho only demand by tho Olmstcad boat-owners. Action Sujrprsted Engineer Frank suggested that the council consider development of a river road from Johnson street to Olmstead street, pointing out that the engineers might be agree- able to nuch a project, which would Include development of the Olm- stfttd street harbor. Ho declared "The engineers have recommendec no site. The procedure Is for a community to select n site and then the engineers hold a public hear- ing." When it was suggested that the council consider the four proposed street, the upper end of Latsch island. Bathhouse slough nnd the East End nt the Armour choose one of Ward Alderman Stanley Wleczorek reminded, "Don't forget that you're committed to o project at ready." the East End site al- Truman Invites Top Lawmakers To Food Meeting By Jack Hell Si-attic Tart (R. Ohio) disclosed today that Prc.xi drnt Truman has InvHi'd congres Monri) loaders to mrct with him in Washington next Monday to ells cuis the world food problems, Tart, who heads the Senate's Re- publican policy committee, told a news conference he would be un- able to attend but had discussed the proposed meeting with Senator Vandenbcrg of Michigan, president Marshall Calls Experts Home for Relief Study By Edward E. Bomar Washington Secretary of State George Marshall is calling home his top experts on western Europe's needs for an intensified at- tack on the critical problem of what the United States must do to help Europe. William L. Clayton, under secre- tary of mate for economic affairs, nnd Lewis W. Douglas, American ambassador to Great due to return next week to report on the IG-nation Paris conference n which they had a direct hand. Other officials who took part in the final stages of tho Marshall plan conference on European recov- ery already are back. Taylor En Route Home From Rome, by way of England, Myron C, Taylor, President Tru- man's personal envoy to the Vati- can, is en route home, presumably vlth first hand information on the of Pope Plus XII, The word, of these travels coln- cago exchanges. President Truman, meanwhile called a special cabinet meeting toi discuss what was described oSlcially' as "the general food situation." The President was reported giving "every consideration" to the problem of the high cost of living. On the Chicago Board of Trade. wheat fell as much as nine cents a bushel before steadying. After the first hour, .wheat was 4% to 5% I cents lower with December at Corn was 2-2-Ti lower, December and oats to 1% lower, December In Chicago, hogs ,were steady to lower, October egg futures down nearly a cent a dozen to 54-54.40 cents and November butter futures :lded with ments: these other develop- of the Senate, European The Ohio senator snkl It was hi.1 understanding that Mr. Truman desires to with both the Re- publican and Dcmocrntlc congres- sional Icotlerr. the world food situa- tion as it rclittfs to proposed ex- ports under the Marshall plan of aiding Europe. He .nnld so far as ho knnw.s the discussion will Involve only incidentally the high cost of food at homo. Ford Fires 19 in Gambling Organization Detroit Prosecutor James N. Wayne County urged 1. It was learned that Marshall has been told by his top advisers hat failure has met all searches or funds which could be used to meet Europe's needs before Con- rcss can act on a long-range re- overy program. The attitude of hcse advisers is that it must be "a pcclal session or bust." The Drmatlon presumably figured in Marshall's report to President Tru- man Monday. Direct Pleas 2. The French and Belgian airi- assadors submitted direct pleas for emergency food supplies to Under Secretary of State Robert A. Lovett yesterday. French Ambassador Henri Bonnet said his country must have an increased allocation of wheat from the principal exporting nations for the remainder of the year. Baron Sllvercruys, the Bel- gian envoy, told reporters the "food situation is gloomy evcryhere." 3. A special governmental organi- zation of economic specialists has been set up to study the calculation of the Paris conference that western Europe must have in outside from the United back on its feet by the ond of 1051. The group in- cludes officials of the State, Agri- culture. Commerce and Interior de- mrtinonts assigned to some ten were off as much as one half cent 71-71.25 cents a pound. Statement Tomorrow Presumably the cabinet will dis- cuss appeals from western Europe for additional relief and the pos- sible effect this might have on the high cost of living In this country. Even Ayers, assistant White House press secretary, told report- ers 'an expected White House state- ment on the European emergency aid program will not be forthcoming tonight. It mny possibly come to- morrow since the President will liol a press conference in the morning Mr. Truman in a letter to Rep rcsentatlve O'Toole (D.-N. Y.) sai yesterday that he is giving tli matter of high prices careful at tention and hopes to reach a decl slon "sometime soon" as to wha may be done to help the situation Before today's cabinet meeting: Mr. Truman arranged to see Secre tary of Agriculture Clinton Ander sou for the .third consecutive day He also hod an appointment with Dr. Edwin G. Nourse, chairman of his council of economic advisers. Anderson is a member of the special cabinet food commiteee along with Secretary of State George Marshall and Secretary of Commerce A. W. Harriman. committees, each dealing with a specific subject such as food, ma- chinery or coal. Social Security Plan for Russian Winers Announced Soviet govern- ment announced today a cradlc-to- grave social security program for Russian coal miners. The government also announced] McCarthy Urges Uniform Codes Buffalo, X. Y. U S Senator Joseph R. McCarthy (R.-Wls.) urged uniformity In building codus and mass productio'h yesterday as a means of the housing problem. vice-chairman of the congressional committee now in- vestigating the, housing shortage, told members of the Greater Buf- falo Advertising club: "There arc now approximately different building codes in existence throughout the country. Mass production is not possible un- der these circumstances. "The building industry Is in Uie same position the automotive in- dustry would bo in if cuch state Two Box Cars Fall in Bed of Little Greek Thirteen freight cars were thrown off the track, GOO feet of rails torn up and a railroad bridge damaged at a. m. here today when a wheel flange on the lead car of 78- car freight train broke off. No one vas injured. The mishap, which took place on he Dubuque division of the Chi- :ago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pa- Iflc railroad, occurred within the :orporate limits of Brownsville near he Wildcat' creek cridge. Wrecking crews, working to clear 2ie line, are expected to have the ails and' bridge repaired by late No cars were broken open in the rash, although live were turned pskle clown by the force of the ile-up and two lay In the creek. The train was an extra. The Dubuque division extends be- iveon La Crosso and Savanna, 111., he introduction of a system'of rank I OH toclav after the technical staffs of the coal mineB. Ford Motor Company Tho workers and the workers, including three foremen, supervisory personnel of the Soviet Ford accused the men of acting colU Industry now are covered by a as DlckUDK nnd collet-tori for hnrw comprehensive system of pensions, cs doing Pay, seniority pay, and bonuses _ .._.. i. Mlnni'K' fnm llns were Included in n S15.000 n day business within its big Rouge plant. Chinese Reds Sever Manchuria Rail Line Tientsin The Chinese government, expecting n, communist drive In Manchuria, found its rail- way lifeline to the crucial terri- tory severed by reel raiders at sev- eral points toflny. Reports reaching here from the north said the TIentsln-Mukclcn rullrond had been cut both north and Miuth of the great! wall, with 000 communists mossing at the wall itself near Shanholkwan. Miners' families were Included in tho security system. The Russian miners, who formerly were covered by the general pro- gram of social security, now will get special benefits. Dutch Report Two Killed in Batavia Datnvia, The Nether- lands army said today that Indo- nesian violations of the United Na- tions August 4 coaso fire order now numbered A communique laid the Dutch le.'it two killed, five vouncied and two missing in 14 clashes yesterday. iad its own requirements for the construction of a car." He also declared that exgEssive: profits were contributing materially to savanna mid E W OK of to .the high cost of housing and Dub cj'lloj tnvln dlspatchcr. asserted thnt 11 Industry was un- offlclals arc not posi- abe to stop the "gray market' wlmt causcc, thc wrcck nails and other scarce materials it a llncjcr onc or cars ap might be necessary for Congress to pal.entjy broke causlng the train take steps to see that they do. bucklc near tne bridge. The cars were loaded with scrap iron, canncc goods and lumber. They contained nothing perishable. Brownsville is in Houston1 county about eight miles southeast of Hokah. Thc train left La Crosse and switched to the Dubuque divi- U. S. Statements of Paul Conflict Frankfurt Mystery sur- rounding the whereabouts of Dr. Rudolf Paul, missing premier of the state of ThurJngin in thc Soviet zone of Germany, was deepened to- day by conflicting American state- ments on reports that he had turn- ed up in the U. S. zone. One high American source, who sion main line at River Junction near La Crescent. R. E. BeauvaJs. Dubuque, division freight and passenger agent, said the wreck had been reported to his office but Urns so. far he had re- ceived only sketchy reports. Two wrecking crews consisting o" about 70 men were dispatched to the wreck early this morning, Traffic Problems Red Aliens in declined to be identified by name, i one from La Crosse and one from said last night that there was "no question that Paul is here in the American zone and is being held by Savanna. Earl Hanlon of Dubuque was en- gineer of the freight and J. S. Han- certain American authorities." jlcy of Dubuque, the conductor. This informant added that Paul, who disappeared from the Soviet zone September with his wife and an interpreter, was in custody in the Frankfurt area. Army intelligence authorities, lowevcr, denied that the missing premier was being held by Ameri- can forces. Japanese Warned of Wildlife Decline were warn- ed today that unless they quit kill- ing off their wild birds and animals for food, wildlife would soon be wiped out. Needed Also, Lovett Says 'Big Three' Agree to Release Part of Store Promptly Allied Three" commission has agreed to make a prompt distribution of part of a gold, store scizetl during the war from the Germans as a means of helping meet critical financial needs or European coun- tries. Under Secretary of State Robert Lovett said today that representa- tives of the United States.- Britain and Prance, forming a "gold pot" commission, agreed to restore the gold to those countries from whicn, it was looted by the Nazis. Lovett told a news conference that only about half of the golit sot can be distributed Immediately. In. answer to a question, Lovett said he believes use of the gold vUl not eliminate the need for stop-gap emergency aid for- western Europe from the United States. But, he added, it will be a sub- stantial help and might help to case France over its present finan- cial difficulties. French Appeal In Paris, French, lenders were re- ported to have told Secretary of the Treasury John Snydcr that Franca will face a financial crisis within few weeks unless help is forthcom- ing and that any aid under the Marshall plan would be too late. Lovett said the United States urged a preliminary distribution of the gold not Inter than October 15 nnd the commission has agreed to try to meet this deadline. Of the Nazi-looted gold, about worth has been recov- ered by American forces in Ger- many and about worth recovered from other countries. 11 VUc Claims Eleven countries have filed claims to the money, totaling nearly and Lovett explained about half the amount now in hand will have to be withheld to meet claims. Aside from France the claimants Include Albania, Austria, Belgium. Czechoslovakia, Greece, Italy, Lux- embourg, the Netherlands, Poland and Yugoslavia. Lovett announced the move to meet European stou.-Rap needs conference at which he displayed tulky copy of the full report of the Ifi-nation Paris conference on Marshall plan for European eco- nomic recovery. He said the massive series ol documents -was forwarded last night by Secretary of State George Mar- shall from New York and -would be transmitted today to President Truman. Argentine Women Given Suffrage Buenos A new signed last night by President Juan D. gave Argentina women the right to vote In federal elections. The nation's 14 provinces are considering similar legislation to permit female -suffrage in pro- vincial balloting. Weather FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and vicinity Clearing and cooler tonight with frost in tho lowlands: low 36: Thursday, fair and continued quite cool; high. 60. Minnesota: Clearing with dim- nishing winds and colder frost and freezing temperatures tonight. Thursday fair and continued, cooL Wisconsin: Clearing and cooler tonight -with frost. Freezing tem- peratures northwest and in north, central portion, Thursday fair and continued cool. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24' hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 72: minimum, 47; noon; 50; precipitation, sun sets to- night nt 6: sun rises tomorrow at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max, Min. Prec. .21 Of The 13 Cars derailed in this morning's freight train pile-up near Brownsville, Minn., arc shown in the top picture, taken by a Republican-Herald photographer who flew over the accident scene at noon today in a plane chartered from the Winona Flying service. A wrecking car is shown at lower right grappling a freight car preparatory to lifting it back on the tracks. Tho lowei; picture, also an air view, shows three of the derailed cars, two of them lying in Wildcat creek. Note how the track has buckled, right center. Bemldjl 59 Denver ..............90 De.s Molncs..........78 Duluth 02 International Falls... 55 Kansas City 77 Los Angeles .........87 Minneapolis-St. Paul 70 Phoenix .............106 DA1LV EIVEK BGLLETXN Flood Stage C4-hr. Stnse Today Change 31 60 53 3-1 26 58 67 45 69 .03 .17 .01 Topic at Duluth Duluth, to ;hc 54th annual conference of the International Association of of Police today were devoting a complete convention session to the discussion of traffic problems and disaster control. Franklin M. Krenil, Evanston, 31., director of the association's traffic division, presented his asi- n.ual report. Minuesotans who were to lead a IT c iJ. TO j panel discussion included Chief Earl M. Latlmcr of the; highway patrol; J. K P. Darrell, highway depart- ment traffic engineer: Associate Justice C. R. Maguey of the supreme court, and Thomas J. Naylor, St. Louis county attorney. a Stay, Thomas Says ft projn- ise from Chairman J. Parnell Thomas (R.-N. J.) to prove that top rung government officials were involved, the House committee on un-American activities opens a hearing today on its assertion that alien communists havev.been per- micted to enter and remain in this country, Thomas summoned Hanns Eislcr, Hollywood song writer, nnd Sum- ncr undersecretary of state, as the first witnesses for a scheduled three-day jHouseman Suspected of Illinois Slaying Adjudged Insane Whcnton, III. A e- -p houseman who was twice questioned 7 in connection with the death Scp-iDam 7', T. W. Red Wing 14 Lake City Reads 12 I Dam 4, T. W. 'Dam 5. T, W. 'Dam 5A. T. W. iWinona 
                            

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