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Winona Republican Herald: Friday, September 19, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 19, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER GrniT-1-.lly fiitr imiljfht anil Saturday; wnrm trfntjtht. cooler R EGISTER Now for Swtmrolnr Fool Election November 3 Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47. NO.. 181 WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 19, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES Lash New O U.S. Expected to Ignore Vishinsky Attack Russians Press U. N. For Action Soviet Diatribe Charges America Is 'Warmonger' By John M. Iliphtowcr New York Thc United States probably will officially Ignore Russia's sensational ".warmonger- ing" attack in the United Nations assembly yesterday and push for- ward with Its proposal for over- hauling U.N. pence machinery In thc face of the Soviet union's an- nounced absolute opposition. The bitter Russian blast, dcllver- rd In angry words by Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Vishinsky virtually charged a conspiracy with- in the United States to make war on Russia. Thc speech was describ- ed by ranking American delegates Warmonger' Says He Is 'Honored' Vishinsky Doesn't Pray Grand KaphK Senator Alexander Wiley (R.- Wta.) told the Michigan State Bar axsodatlon last night he had met Russia's deputy for- eign minister. Andrei Y. VLihln- nki, a, week nco aboard the liner Queen Elizabeth. "I told Vishinsky that every night I pray Russia, America, Itritaln and thc other reach a basin of understanding insuring permanent thc jwnator related. don't he sold the Soviet official answered through an Interpreter. Wiley, chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee, was rcturn- inc from a European tour which he naUl he made own ex- pense to fret first hand view of condlllons there. ox Itself country and communl.it world as Russian propaganda. Secretary of State are going cr governor of Pennsylvania, told a t his home to Anilrcl V. Vishinsky highly honored that Mr jail down six.cents oneI Vlshtnsky thinks me a beans Senator'-Brlen McMahon (D.-' mltted jn a single session. In former chairman of the case of com it was jjle sccond concessional atomic energy com- consecutlvc day Of limit declines, mlttoe, said "Vlshinsky's denuncia- market. started out firm with tlon of me as a warmonger is ma-, Wnea1. and oats up a C0uple of cents liclous." Two factors set 'oil the break Another man on Vishinsky's Onc wa_s increased offerings of cash) Representative Charles A. Eaton corn by tne country. The other wab (R.-N. chairman of the House an nKriculture department survey foreign affairs committee, In a CBS said that half the corn crop _______ 'e made in thc last three lUJUlKil radio address last night said that was jrec from rrost damage. "We must have a showdown with of the crop was to have A. of Urged To Lead State Housing Program By Jack Mackay St. Paul Stuart Kothman, state director of housing and re- development, today carried his drive for more homes to Minnesota's civic-minded leaders. Emphasizing that a successful at- tack on the housing- problem can developed only "so fantastic" that It would defeat !munlty, Governor Luther Young- and be written off In recently-named housing di- y and elsewhere In the non- rcctor scnt pleas to nil chambers straight-out ol cotnmerco In the state to lend encouragement In providing Secretary of State George C. and decent housing at Marshall was being ndvlsed along thc carncst possiblo time for vet- line by top members of his dele- crans nnd trlelr families and others, gallon, it wa.t learned, and while final delegation decision as to the T__J_J next American move WOK yet to be 1 entrCCl made It was authoritatively expected to call for the silent treatment for Qf Vishinsky, Want Action Russia pressed swiftly today for United Nations action on her de by Vishinsky to have "made mcrujisuu vuiy slanderous statement on the So- ending Wednesday and were one to vlet said Jordan had no flve pcr cent ahead of a year ago, ----------1. but added that resistance to soar- Ing food prices was stiffening. There was some drop in demand across the country for meat, butter and eggs. Puzzles Police united iiunuu.-! ntnui. Chicago' Police wondered mands to curb what Andrei Y. Vlsh- today whether a remorseful slayer Insky yesterday called "criminal" war propaganda States. -........._ ot three-year-old Gerald In the United now Is attending to the Secretary-General Trygve Lie dis- grave. Shortly after a coroner's Jury closed he hncl received a formal re-decided yesterday thnt ____ quest from thc Soviet chief dele- death by strangulation in his crib Thompson 23, was shot to death gate to have the pro'posal added to junc 19 was "murder perpetrated and ucr husband was found fatally ho nc-i-nrin of the ccneral assom- by some unknown John today in their room in a P. Coghlan, attorney for the child's ncnr southside rooming house. dt-batc. Thc new he agenda of thc general assem- bly, now in Its third day of general Vishlnsky move clear- ed the way for a preliminary test, possibly later today, on thc Soviet resolution. Truman Attacked Thc Russian leader directed his unprecedented blundcrbass attack against the whole range of Ameri- can foreign policy. Including thc Truman doctrine, the Marshall eco- nomic recovery plan and continued atomic bcmb production, took a quick crack at President Truman and specifically accused nine prom- inent Americans, Including John Foster Dulles of Marshall's delega- tion here, ot being "warmongers" trying to start a war on Russia. The reference to Mr. Truman came when Vishinsky said the Pres- ident's recent speech at thc Intcr- Amorican Defense conference in Brazil emphasized American plans to maintain strong military forces without mentioning American "ob- ligations" under the United Na- tions to seek disarmament, The nine Americana named by Vishinsky as examples of "war- mongers" seeking to start n war on Russia were Dulles, who was sit- ting in the audience before Vishin- sky: Representatives Dorn (D.- S. C.) Virgil Jordan, president or the National Industrial Confer- rncp board: former Governor George H. Earlc of Pennsylvania, who once served as U. S. minister in Hun- gary and Bulgaria: Chairman Eaton (R.-N. J.I of thc House foreign (Continued on Page 14, Column C) VISHINSKY mother, said an unknown person had been placing flowers on the had been placing flowers on the at Lau- grave and otherwise maintaining its dled Qn the operating appearance. Coghlan said Coghlan said the family had tlme belng f0lmd by Mrs. noticed the flowers and grave care Thompson's sister., Mrs. Mildred nn vIslf-.K f.n t.hn cnmetcrv. Degroot. poficse Poles to Control on visits to thc cemetery. Gerald's mother, Mrs. Betty Bar- rows, 22, and his grandmother, Mrs. Rose Black were quoted by police _ as saying the child was found dead _ w> fV In his crib shortly after an intruder (Jrier IVlVer JrOrt had attempted to choke Mrs. Bar- tne level, up 3.3 per cent rows. and Russia a montn ago and 23.4 higher Detective Francis W, Murray said have signed a formal agreement a year aga The food figures Mrs. Barrows told him she was placing administrative authority put at 190_9 per Oj 1925, a gain awakened in her bed the night of over the Oder river port of Szczecin Qf flve per cent slnce ]ast month June 19 by someone "grabbing me." In the hands of the Poles, it was an- nnd 41_2 since a year aga Average wholesale prices of 900 JUne lu uy SOmtOIlu lilt. in but; m A. ww, Thc intruder shook her, Mrs, Bar- nounced today. The Russians will Average wnoiesoic prices 01 auu rows said, and attempted to choke continue to use a section of the port her before her screams apparently for communications with the Soviet (Continued on Page 14, Column o) ._____i i_i________ .nnftinnril-li-m A fiwmilTltf Jl itlCylillS frightened him away. Snow Blocks Alberta Roads CalRary, Snow cover- ed southwestern Alberta today, blocking some roads and disrupting power lines. It was four feet deep at Twin Butte, south of Plnchcr crcrk, 3 Austin Break-Ins Net Burglars Austin. Minn. (m Burglars broke into three business places here Wednesday night, taking a total of In cash. They took Slo from a safe at thc Auitln Coca-Cola Bottling Company pkxn and from a cosh drawer in me office of the Dean Beverage Company. They also broke Into the Llciispse Lumber Company, but ap- parently got no loot. i Drazln child's New of the men described as "warmongers" yester- day by Deputy Foreign Minister An- drei Y. Vishinsky of Russia said he was mistaken or being but one, George H. Earle III, said that if "he means I advocate using the atom bomb on Russia, he is ab- solutely "I know implicitly that the mo- Grain Prices Take Sharp Decline Slump in Non-Food Items Feared; Some Resistance Noted crashed on of trade today in one in representative for Dr. Virgil jn. i -v Jordan, president of "the National Industrial Conference board, Uull ttll U .Ql vuii, said reported that retail sales generally a Increased very slightly in thc week comment. Lake Dragged for Two Victims Near International Falls International Falls, Dragging operations were continued today In a hunt for the bodies of a father and son who drowned when high waves swamped their boat on Lake Kabetogama. A third occupant of the craft, Game Warden Melvin Larson, saved himself by clinging to the overturn- ed craft which drifted five hours before .being blown ashore. rowned were H. W. er, 36, operator of a Lakeshore eating place, and his father Vernon Schoenwether, 56, of Hancock, Minn. The elder Schoenwether with his wife had been visiting at the son's lake home, Two Dead After Mill City Shooting Minneapolis Blanche Charles Thompson, about 25, at table at General hospital a short occupation zone of Germany. Dun and Bradstrcct, meanwhile Mr And Mrsf und-thelr 11-month-old daughter. Anita, together with a few pieces of clothing wade through water on the lo-ke front at New Orleans as high tides made them evacuate their home. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) _ _ G.O.P. Leaders "ThoThi'gh cost of Wpprl to hold top attention of lawmakers in Washington and elsewhere. In a politically important speech prepared for a San Francisco au- dience, Senator Taft (R.-Ohlo) pro- posed that the nation seek to level off wages at a point 50 to 60 per cent, above that of 1939. He said the present level of both represents an 80 to 100 per cent Increase over 1939. Senator Ives CR.-N, Y.) said to- day the world's economy is sick because of "underproduction" and that soaring prices at home are only a symptom of this "disease." "Everybody is talking about high prices and they are pretty 3ld a reporter. "Bui them down until Special Session Washington Republican congressional leaders adopted a "show me" attitude today on the question of a special session of l Congress. One of the first things President Truman is expected to do when he arrives here tomorrow following his trip to South America is'review the foreign situation with top diplo- matic advisers, who already have indicated their belief that Congress production up." 'lend of this year. speaker of conference farm products at the highest level In history although wholesale prices for the entire list of 900 commodi- ties covered by the survey still were 5.9 per cent bejow the record set in 1920, Inflation Necessary At the same time, Senator Elmer Thomas (D.-Okla.) reiterated his contention that this country may have to put up with "inflation" if it is going to pay off the national debt and meet other costs of gov- ernment. Thomas added it may be another six years or even longer before the price situation becomes stabilized. Thomas pointed to the rising BLS indexes, saying "that is inflation based on the 192G level." pries' salftnTfor -committee, told newsmen Index wenfto 1873 ?er cent 5 that Congress has "no percent from i disposition to dodge any emergency aid for Europe before the next scheduled meeting of the legislators January 3. He said Information of his own "from very good sources" Indicated there is "no immediate danger" In the foreign situation. Secretary of State George Mar- shall and Under Secretary Robert Lovctt have intimated strongly that affairs abroad are so critical that a solution cannot be put off until January. Martin, however, said he is in- formed that except in remote cases Europe has good crops this year and there should be no severe food short- ages. Senator Arthur Vandenberg (R.- chairman of the foreign re- La Guardia Remains 'In Deep Sleep' New York Piorello H. La Guardia, 64, gravely ill of a pancreas condition, today re- mained "in a deep sleep from which he cannot be Dr. George Baehr, his phy- sician, said. The former mayor collapsed Tuesday night at his home. An operation June 18 had. shown that his ailment would not re- spond to surgery, the doctor said. After serving 12. years as mayor of New York city, La Guardia in 1946 became direc- tor general of the United Na- tions relief and rehabilitation administration. St. Cloud Man Appointed 7th District Judge 'will tlative Three days later at Columbus, Ohio, Senator Taft chair- man of the Senate's G.O.P. policy committee, said he knew of no do- mestic issue demanding the atten- tion of, a special session. Thus far Harold E. Stassen, former Minnesota governor and avowed presidential candidate, is the only Republican leader demanding that Congress be reconvened immediate- ly. He urged the President to call a special session in an address Wed- nesday at a meeting of the New York State Chamber of Commerce. Denham Extends Time for Unions To Qualify Washington The National Labor Relations board and Robert Through New Orleans today ripped many large signs frorn the tops of buildings and scnt them tumbling Into the streets. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) officers until October 31 to sign affi davits disavowing communism. The effect of the action Is that the board will not dismiss A.F.L. and C.I.O. cases before that date. davits. weighs three to four pounds Judfte E. J. Ruciremcr St. Judge St. Judge E. Ruegemer of St. Cloud today was hwited to speak .pointed Judge of the seventh ju- and J. Ruegemer of St. Cloud today was way7nvited to sper SffSyfi? coined audiences and Youngdahl. juoge jxueguniei inia WJK vu.wai.jvj them' "Members or Hommc caused by the retirement of Judge enurch, friends, neighbors, Joseph B. Hicisl. At the same time and ,ellow the governor announced appoint-_________-----_ ment of Earl J. Melnz, St. Cloud _- attorney, as Stearns county probate Roller BlaSt judge. Would-Be Plane Thief at Rochester Saved by Failure Rochester, An optim- istic amateur tried to steal an-air- S. D. Pastor Covers Scattered Parish by Air By Alex Johnson Leromon, S. 32-year- old pastor of one of the nation's biggest parishes goes about his duties with jiT Bible in on hand and a pilot's logbook In thc other. Month ago tlie Rev. Norval G. Hegland discovered that the air- plane was thc best, and about thc only way to reach on a single Sun- day the scattered churches of a parish, covering parts of six coun- ties In northwestern South Dakota, where counties run large and dis- tances long. He has over 200 hours In his log- book, holds a private pilot's'license and has lifted his light plane aloft n.n average of 14 hours a week "for the church." Two Sundays each months he files about 220 air miles, on other Sabbaths about 75, to visit range country churches. Weekdays he "drops in" on ladies .aid meetings, makes parish calls, and "generally try to keep in touch with my peo- ple by airplane." He estimates he covers air miles each week "and haven't had my car further out of town than the Lemmon, S. D., airport" since his installation' in July as pastor of the "Lemmon Circuit Air parish" of the Eyangelical Lutheran church. Storm Cuts Off City; Damage High Red Cross Calls for Boats; Governor Rushes Relief New tropical hur- ricane roared Inland today toward southern Arkansas, after New Orleans with destructive power I that crushed buildings and flooded j I exposed areas of the Pontchartrain I lulci-froiit. The Weather bureau, in a a m. advisory, placed the storm's center '20 miles northwest of New Orleans, It, wa.s moving north- westward at 15 miles per hour, with, winds ranging from 80 to 120 m.pJu The advisory said the disturbance probably would reach southern Arfc- misjis by midnight, with winds extending Inland about 10O miles from the gulf const. Baton Rouge braced for the blow. and Acting Governor Emlle Vcrret closed the capital and sent homa all state employes. The deceptive calm of the hur- ricane's which began in New Orleans at a. m, ceased a.t H a m.. and thundering winds up to 90 m.p.h. beat thc hapless city from, the opposite direction. Colonel Frank Spciss ordered all National Guard units in New Orleans mobil- ized in Jackson barracks. The entire Gulf coast, from Pen- sacola westward, was raked by cy- clonic winds. More than resi- dents of Alabama fishing- raced for high ground from. consul areas. Near BIloxl, Miss., stout timber piers were snapped like match- sticks, and roofs were torn, from many homes. A tide ten feet l normal flooded residential areax. and gigantic waves broke over the city's seawall, built 20 years ago against storms. High- way 90 was Impassable and studded with stalled automobiles. The steamship Empire State snip- ped its hawsers and reeled from thc Congress street -wharf in. New Orleans, but- succeeded in reaching midstream and both, an- chors were dropped. A destroyer- escort broke loose and rammed Algiers ferry. Acting Governor Emlle Verret or- dered all state facilities for ter placed at the disposal of the city of New Orleans. Red Cross headquarters made an emergency appeal for small boats, especially skiffs to navigate streets in the lake front area. Authorities warned all residents of outlying areas to try to get to the center of the city by any possible. A wall of water driven, by 60- milcs-pcr-hour winds forced the navy to evacuate the naval air sta- tion at Lake Pontchartrain early this morning. Highways along Mississippi's OuOT coast were reported flooded at.sev- eral points where water surged over the sea wall. Approximately persons hud- dled in New Orleans' municipal au- ditorium, and another were reported sheltered In 40 city schools. house, "but, unfortunately, on the opposite side of a river." Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Wlnpna and vicinity Generally to the northwest and becoming their cooler Saturday night. anecdotes for the flying man God. Once, Mrs. Hegland and home. Mr. Hegland landed in a day except p-ixuy field about 150 ooer Minnesota Cloudy and cool vards Trom the southed portion, yards irom trie cloudv soutl Partly cloudy south. and mostly cloudy with occasional LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the pposite side of a river." showers north portion tonight and nefnyCs SS In waded across the river with the tuxe. baby In her arms while I tied down the plane." 12 m. today. Another time, Mr. Hegland landed Maximurn 88; minimum, 67; noon, for a Sunday service 'and discovered precipitation, none; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at 5'50. _____ TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pet. 65 Moines ........93 or a unay servce an air show under way at a pasture to the the air show was he recalls. "ItiCWcaKO .........90 e me a thrfji to address Moillcs ........93 Judge Ruegemer fills the vacancy thern. "Members of Homme Lu- mcort hv t.hn retirement of Judge Duluth International Falls Kansas City Mpls-St. Paul---- New Orleans..... Seattle 50 52 95 90 89 66 67 45 48 T2 63 72 42 .04 .03 JStlC StUltttUUi. W llilJ Ifclii N. Denham, its general counsel, to- plane at the Rochester Municipal day allowed A.F.L. and C.I.O. top alrport Thursday and for "Tils own officers' until October 31 to sign affl- _nnri thine he didn't. good it's a good thing lie didn't. Fred J. Gruhlke, attendant, heard an airplane engine start. He Jumped nd C.I.O. cases before that date. swlnfg reach policy decisions on whether A wing tip brushed the giound, their officers should sign the affl- however, and the engine stopped. _ sriiTi Damages Plant at Appleton Applcton. Wis. An explo- sion In thc fire box of a boiler caused heavy damage today at the plant of the Consolidated Badger Dam o. TW, Milk Company. One employe suf- U-im OA, i. w, fered minor injuries. E. H. Knickel, manager, said the K. rl. JK.mcKei, muiiuuci., suiu ITT employe, Millard Kucksdorf, lit the Dam C, T. U. oil burner and when it went out climbed on a ladder to shut off ed down bricks. When Gruhlke reached the ship the cockpit was empty and there was no trace of the pilot. Officials said it was a good thing the would-be thief was unable to off the ground. The plane's Imported Grouse Rivals Beef in N. Y. Market New New York but- o1-" cher figures that with beef at the rudder, wings and propeller had price it is, scotch grouse wouldn't been damaged in a mishap a wee.: look too steep at a pair. So he ago and had not been repaired If emported 200 of them yesterday, the ship had taken off, officials neatly packed in heather. A pair said. It probably would have: crashed because of: tlie inoperable parts. Moslems Wreck Newspaper Plant Pciplng- A mob of Chinese Moslems wrecked the plant of the newspaper Hsin. pao today after overpowering 30 policemen guard- ing the premises. Thc Moslems charged an article slurred their religion and attacked despite an apology by the management. dUllUCU W1I M, vw the air' pressure. When thc burner. Dam i7. T. w was lighted again the resulting ex- T plosion blew out the sides of the boiler, shattered windows and knock- DAILY RIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-hr. Stage Today Changs Red Wing Lake City Reads Dam 4. T. W. Dam 5, T. W, Wlnona Dam 6, Pool Dakota Dam 7, Pool 14 2.4 6.1 12 3.2 4.1 2.3 3.2 13 5.4 10.1 4.1 7.6 9.3 1.8 __...... 12 Tributary Streams 2.7 3.2 2.1 0.7 2.8 2.3 4- -1 CWppcwa at Durand. Zumbro at Theilman. Buffalo above Alma... Trempealeau at Dodge Black at Neillsville... Black at Galesvillc... La Crosse at W. Salem 1.7 Root at Houston......5.9 RIVER FORECAST 
                            

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