Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, September 16, 1947 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 16, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                W EATHER Clnudy and warmer t; KcUy und Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press R EGISTER Now for Swimming Fool Election November 3 Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47, NO. 178 W1NONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 16, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES Swimming Pool Election to Be Nov. 3; Contract Let for Gabrych Grandstand Structure To Contain Seats Johnson Company Given Job on Bid of The Johnson Construction Company, entering a low bid o was awarded the con tract for the erection of a new grandstand at Gab- rych park by the city councl Monday evening. Award-or the contract to the Wlnona firm was a victory for Fourth Ward Alderman Stanley wieczorek, principal proponent of an Improved East End park, who a live to four council decision. Bucking him were the third ward aldermen. "William Theuror and Howard Baumann; one first ward alderman, Loyde Pfelffer, and one second ward alderman, Joseph Dettle. When the decision was made ear- ly this year to Improve Gabrych park by the addition of lighting facilities and increased seating ca- pacity only one alderman of the then council voted against the de- velopment. Alderman Dcttle said then that the site potentialities at Gabrych do not warrant a largo ex- penditure and he repeated his stand last night. Two Bids Received Alderman Thcurcr, president or the council, favored the develop- ment last winter, but last night he opposed such a largo expenditure. Alderman Pfolffer and Baumann were not on the council when the decision was made last winter and were not parties to the plan. The council received two bids at the bid opening last night. Also bidding was W. M. C.. Inc., which entered a bid of In awarding the contract to the Johnson Construction Company th council understood that the projc would be completed sometime nc May. It was nearly 2 a. slj and a holt hours after the scssio began, that the council voted on th issue of the development of th baseball park. In commenting In response to A derman Wlcczorek's Insistence on decision last night, President Theur er said "I would like to revert tho original Idea we had. that w purchase temporary bleachers. Th board of education Is purchasin bleachers and, perhaps, we cou] work out a plan whereby we woul use theirs In the summertime an they could use our in tho fall an spring. That way, wo could, per haps, get by on an expenditure o and still have the same seat inc capacity." Termed Good For City Such a plan. Alderman Wlcczorc' retorted, would make Gabrych par; an "ugly sight." He pointed ou that the lights arc now bclr.R erect rd In accordance with the plan t f after dawn, as planned. There was Italian and Slav rioting in Trieste. British-American military gov- rnment headquarters said the Vmertcans at Post No. 6, on a main oad to Trieste, held their ground when u. Yugoslav unit of 34 sol- diers presented itself at the provi- sional, ant} disputed, boundary and demanded permission to cross. Battle Formation The Yugoslavs called up' rein- forcements 4n full battle formation, Immediately a battalion of IT. S, infantry was lent up from a re- serve position with, its full com- plement of armor and artillery. Major General T. S. Alrey, Bri- tish commander vin Trieste, said Seven Burned ToDeathin Arkansas Benton, per- burned to death today when flames destroyed their three-room frame dwelling four miles west of here in the Oua- chita, foothills. They were John Whaicn Wal- lace, 45, his 40-year-old wife, Lorcne, and fire 'of their six children. Wallace was n. small farmer and sawmill laborer. Coroner J. P. Sims said ruins of a small liquor still were found in the room where the blaze ap- parently started. The only member of the fam- ily group to escape was Roice, 11. quoted him as saying he was awakened in the back room by an explosion, saw the front two rooms in a mass of flames, slammed the connecting- door and dived out a back exit. In addition to the parents, the dead were Corrinc Wallace, 13; John D. Wallace, ten; Frankie, four; Reuben, three, and Daiscy, two months. J. 14-Year-OId 'leads Innocent To Murder Count Harrison, K. Walter the Yugoslavs 'indicated then they would abide by the decision of the British-American command and would refer the matter to a diplo- matic level. "Owing to the extraordinary good sense and tactful handling by the American Airey said, "an Smlgelskl, 14, stood motionless be- fore the court today while his coun- sel entered a formal plea of Innocent to a murder charge in the kidnap- strangling of the boy's 11-year-old pal. still sullen and un- emotional, stared straight ahead as his newly-acquired counsel, An- thony Calandrl, argued that the schoolboy's case was not within the jurisdiction of the state criminal courts because of bis Juvenile status. The courtroom wns crowded with people of the working class area, many of whom knew both Smigelski and the victim, John Preston, Jr., of Kearny. They sat silently through the hearing, Smigelski had signed a statement earlier, Detective Captain Arthur Ford said, relating how he lured the slightly-built younger boy into the onely building and strangled him with a belt to prove to himself that le was "no sissy." Ford signed a 'ormal murder complaint against October 13 Last Day To Register Judges Named at Session of City Council The city council voted Monday night to hold the Winona swim- ming pool referendum. November 3 in accordance with an act of the last Minnesota legislature, which permitted the city to issue up to in bonds provid- ing the people approved such an action. Registration for this election may now be made in the city recorder's office on the third floor of the city building. All citizens who have noe voted in an election here since 1945 are required to re-register to be eligible to vote in the November I referendum. In addition, those who have moved since they last voted I must report the change at the city 'recorder's office. October 13 Deadline Every day is registration, day. deadline for registration, however, is October 13. The Question appearing on ballot will be: "Shall the city of Winona, Ihim yesterday.. Strihet in Italy strikes that menaced her already shaky economy marked Italy's return to sovereignty today. The peace treaty with the winners of World War n took effect night. Rome newspapers declared the treaty "infamous" and "dictate." incident was prevented." He added that the affair might have led "to bloodshed and a breach of the articles of the peace treaty." Drop Back Both the American and Yugo- slav officers at the post said they would consult with higher authori- ties. The Yugoslavs dropped back a few feet from the line. Yugoslavs had jumped the gun soon after midnight on thfc British- American-Yugoslav timetable for NLRB machinery by a regional of- fice, appeals to Uiu board Itself. Taper Mill Workers At Milwaukee, President John P. Burke of the A.F.L, International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Puper Mill Workers, declared yester-' day his union would comply fully with the. terms of the Toft-Hartley aw even if it brought the union in- Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS For Wlnona and vicinity: Mostly cloudy and somewhat warmer to- night with occasional light rain early Wednesday and Wednesday forenoon. Clearing and cooler late Wednesday. Low tonight 55; high Wednesday 70. with occa- sional showeri tonight .ind south and cost Wednesday, clearing north- west Wednesday. Somewhat warm- er tonight. Quite cool again Wed icsday. and some what warmer tonight, with llgh rain northwest and central. Wedncs day cloudy with light rain north and .cntral, reaching extreme suuth by ate afternoon. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 in. today: Maximum, 64; minimum, 50; noon her to occupy treaty-gained lands. 0; precipitation, trace; sun sets to- at sun rises tomorrow at Rioting between ilavs heralded the Italians birth of rce territory of Trieste, embracing this "Adriatic port and its environs. Italy thus lost some square miles of territory which she hac icld since a few years after World War r, by terms of a treaty with the victors of World War n ratified formally In Paris, yesterday. Some 470 square miles went to the free to conflict with the A.F.L. executlveiterritory under the United Nations, Brazil's Oswaldo Aranha, standing, extreme left, holdover president of the United Nations assembly, addresses the opening session of the United Natiops in its Flushing Meadows home at New York today. Seated below Aranha Is Mayor William O'Dwyer of New York who welcomed delegates. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) joard. Burke, from Fort Edwards, N. Y. addressed the paper mill workers' 2lst annual convention. He emphasized that the union dis- approved of and would work for re- peal of the Taft-Hartley act, and said he advocated defeat of the congresmen who voted for it McCarthy Hit Burke praised Daniel W. Hoan, the former Socialist Milwaukee mayor, and the late Victor L. Bcr- ger, socialist leader. "A few years ago." Burke said, 'the word 'progressive' and the names 'Milwaukee and Wisconsin' were almost synonymous. "It just doesn't look .right and the rest to Yugoslavia. U S. Men Returned (The peace treaties for four other Axis Bulgaria, Finland and activ- ated yesterday by deposit of rati- fication instruments in the Krem- lin, in the EXTENDED FORECASTS Minnesota-Wisconsin Temper- atures will average three to six degrees below normal. Normal maximum CO north to 76 south. Normal- minimum 43 north, 53 south. Cooler Wednesday. Little change Thursday. Warmer Friday and Saturday. Cooler again Sunday. Precipitation will average one- tenth to three-tenths inch. Rain ;onight and Wednesday. Showers Saturday. TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pet. Chicago 68 Denver ..........81 Des Molnes 69 Duluth ..........57 Tho Italian treaty went Into ef-JLos Angeles......92 feet at moanJMpls.. St. Paul 62 seem right' to have ICharlle' Mc- Carthy of Applcton (Senator Jos- eph McCarty) occupy a seat in the Senate that was filled by two of the most illustrious statesmen America has ever two La FoJJettes, father and son." State Ore Shipments Exceed 1946 Figures St. Paul Minnesota had shipped tons of iron ore up to September 1 this year as com- pared to tons for the same period last year, the state division of lands and minerals re- sorted last night. A total of about tons shipped was forecast f the season lasts November as usual. until mid- time (C p. m., and the free territory simultaneously came nto At that moment, Yugoslav troops moving in to complete occupation of the treaty-gained area the Istrian peninsula and land to the north made contact with United States-British forces 23 miles north- west of Trieste on the new provi- sional Italian-Yugloslav border. The troops met at an outpost on the edge of Gorlzla. Last night, before the troop movements, Yugoslav army officers returned a U. S. officer and enlisted man they had held since August 9. Tho two were Lieutenant John i. Dwyer of Chicago, medical of- ficer, and Corporal Willie Smith of Waycross, Ga., his assistant. They were seized as they fished on the Isonzo river near the Morgan line and had been reported In a guard- house at Tolmino. An army spokesman said they needed rest but otherwise were "not n bad condition." Red wing Lake City Reads Dam 4, T.W. Dam 5, T.W. Dam 5A, T.W. Winona (C. P.) Dam 6, T.W. Dakota (C. P.) Dam 7, T.W. 46 56 52 42 6-1 issue its negotiable bonds in the ag- gregate principal amount of not to exceed for the purpose of providing and maintaining a mu- nicipal recreational ground, a mu- nicipal swimming pool or other rec- reational activities, pursuant to Chapter 355, Laws of Minnesota, Date of the election was recom- mended by City Attorney S. D. J. Bruski who had conferred with T. O. Evcnsen Associates, Inc., Min- neapolis, bond consultants. Mr. Evenscn was here last night. Council President William Theur- er named Aldermen Loyde "oseph Dcttle, Howard Baumann md James Stoltman to the elec- lon committee. Judges, who will receive each, were named by the council last night, and the Judges in each of the precincts will name two clerks. The judges named are: Flrtt Ward (First precinct, Creighton Miller. John Hassingcr and James Fraser; second, Mattio McQuire, John Wise and Mrs. Ella Umbrcit; third, Fred Nciheiscl, Fred Kleist and George S'ccck; fourth, J. E. Harris, Andrew Franzkoviak and Mrs. Ray Steele. and fifth. Otto Hoppe, Mrs, Robert Ziebell and Mrs. Harry Johnson. Second Ward First precinct, P. H. Rleks, Mrs. J. B. Compton and Walter Kaiser; second. Ana Schmeling, Theodore :tankc and T. J. McCarthy, and third, Mrs. Bernard Snyder, Andrew Grcdcn and Mrs. Roy Pnngburn. Third Ward First precinct, Fred Molilkc, Mrs. L. M. Morse and Mrs. Elizabeth Wal- ton: second, O. W. Thodc, Trippc and O. W. Frcy, and third. W. J. Kurth, P. S. Pronovost and Mrs. C, A. Fockens. Fourth Ward First precinct, Mrs. Mr-rcel Cyert. Clarence Rolbiccki and Mrs, Helen Lcjk; second, A. J. FJsher, Julius Bronk and Mark v Joswick; tlilrd. Romell Wineski, Frances Jereselc and Frank Cicmlnski, and fourth, Mrs. Al Glauncrl, Mrs. Karsiim and Felix Bnmbenck. Constitution Day Set for Wednesday St. Paul Governor Luther Youngdahl today proclaimed icsday as Constitution day, the IGOth anniversary of the formal ndoptlon of the United States con- stitution by delegates from the 13 original states assembled in Phila- delphia. RIVFR BELLETIN Stage 24-hr. Stage Today Change 14 2.5 H- .1 G.I ,1 J2 3.2 ,3 .1 2.4 3.3 13 5.4 4.2 7.6 1.9 Tributary Streams va at Durand. 2.1 -f .4 3.2 .4 2.1 .1 1.7 .1 .9 .1 2.9 2 Chippewa at Durand. Zumbro at Theilman. Buffalo above Alma Whitewater at Beaver. TTempealeau at Dodge Black at Neillsville... Black at Galesvllle Root ai Houston 60 .11 RIVER FORECAST (From Hastings to Guttcnbcrg) During the next 36 hours there vill be no material change in the stages throughout this district ex- cept for a slight decrease in stream flow. Bicycle Licenses Vtust Be Bought Before October I The deadline for securing bi- cycle license platen was an- nounced today by Chief of Po- lice A. J. Bingold xs September 30. Any person not havia; a license on his bicycle by that date will lose the Tight to op- erate the cycle until a plate has been secured. Police Clcrlt Man-in Meier, in charge of the licensing-, pro- gram, said today that approxi- mately licenses have been sold since the sale started early this month. He estimated that there arc about more li- censes to be issued. Chief Bingold reminded that, "Persons not having license plates after the deadline are subject to prosecution, the same as a person operating a car without license pUtec."   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication