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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: September 2, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 2, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER cool lanlfhlt warmer. Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press 145 DAYS Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations Swtmmlnr Too) tut VOLUME 47, NO. 166 WINONA. MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 2, 194 7 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES 35 Dead in T Crash N Truman Cites U.S. Peace Aims U. S. Must Stay Strong, President Says Four-Point Foreign Policy Sketched at Hemisphere Meet QuiUndlnhs, Brazil Pros Ident Truman said today the United States Is "determined to remain strong" to back up a foreign policy based on n desire lor perma- nent peace. He told tho Intcr-Amcrloan de- fense conference that this "Is In no way a threat" because "no great nation has been more reluctant than ours to use armed forces.1 But, he said, "Our aversion to violence must not be misread as a lack of determination on our part to live up to the obligations of the United Nations charter or as an Invitation to others to take liber- ties with the foundations of Inter- national peace. "Our military strength will be retained as evidence of tho serious- ness with which v.'e view our ob- ligations." Nevertheless, Mr. Truman ex- pressed confidence that current international disputes can be set- tled without armed conflict and gave this pledge: "The world mny depend upon It thit we snail continue to go far out of our way to avoid anything that would Increase the tensions of International life." Mr. Truman said the postwar era "has brought us bitter 'disap- pointment and deep concern." "We hf snld, "that a num- ber of nations nre still subjected to a type of foreign domination which, we fought to overcome. Many of the remaining peoples of Europe and Asia live under tht armed aggression." Fear Delaying Kwoterr And he asserted that European economic recovery has lagged be- cause of "political fear and un- certainty In addition to tho devasta- tion caused by war." at Galesville Fair Killed Gipple Honored; Winners Parade In Dresbach Auto Mishap Republican-Herald photo Shown Here ,Are Bert A. Gipple, Galesvllle, oldest ex-secretary of-the Trempealeau County Fair asso- ciation, second.from left, receiving a portable radio from Congressman Merlin Hull, Black River Palls, second from right, during a program held Sunday in honor of his long record of county fair service. Others In the picture are A. L. Twesme, master of ceremonies for the program, extreme left, and Frank Smith, fair association extreme right. The radio was a Joint gift of the Galesvllle Lions club and the fair association. He laid down a four point Amer- ican foreign policy under which (Continued on Face 8> Column 4 TRUMAN Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona imd vicinity: Clear an cool tonight with low 58. Wednei day, fair and somewhat wanne high 84. Minnesota Fair tonight an Wednesday. A little warmer nortt and west portion Wednesday. and cool to night. Wednesday, fair and some what warmer. Extended Weather Minnesota-Wisconsin Temper aturcs will average lour to seven degrees above normal; normal max imum 71 northern Minnesota to 82 southern area; normal minimum 4J northern Minnesota and northern Wisconsin to 58 southern. Abovi normal Wednesday and Thursday a little cooler Friday and Saturday warmer Sunday. Precipitation wU. avcrage less than one-tenth inch: scattered light showers northern sections Wednesday nighfor Thurs- day and again around Saturday Little or no precipitation of conse- quence southern Wisconsin. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. Sunray: Maximum, 84: minimum, 82; noon, 77; precipitation, none. For the 24 hours ending-at 12 m. Monday: Maximum, 82; minimum, 66; noon. 78; precipitation, 1.07. For tho 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 83; minimum, 58; noon. 83; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow nt TEMPEKATUnES ELSEWHERE Max. Mln. Pet Bemldji 79 52 Denver D2 59 Duiutb 7-1 58 Los> Angeles 101 69 Mpls-St, Paul...... 80 5D New Orleans D5 74 New York 78 70 Oklahoma City 107 70 Phoenix Ill 80 Seattle 78 DAILY RIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-hr. Stage Today Change 3 Killed As Planes Crash in Air Near Minneapolis Field pilots were killed and a fourth para< chutcd safely from two planes which collided in the air and crashed fol- lowing the army's aerial greeting to General Dwlght Elsenhower at the Minnesota state fair late Monday. The ships were among 16 awaiting landing orders south of Wold-Cham- berlain field after having flown over the fairgrounds times in formations. Victims of the mishap which occurred while witnesses dale the planes -were -flying side by tide were identified by public relations officers as: Second Lieutenant Donald A. Berdcen and Raymond' Jessup, Minneapolis, and Sergeant Dale E. Collins, Long Prairie, Minn. Warren H. Ellison, a first- lieuten- ant In the reserve stationed at Wold- 3hamberlaln field, parachuted safe- y to the ground. Two nearby planes were damaged by falling debris from the doomed ships but pilots managed to land hem safely, officers reported. Upon being informed of the tragedy, Gen- Elsenhower last night sent the 40 Girls Take Part in Annual Style GaluviHe, Wta. (Special) County fair closed here yesterday with- an estimated crowd of attending the after- noon and evening program. Total attendance for the three-day event reached Fifteen 4-H clubs were represent- ed in yesterday afternoon's stock parade. The groups were Introduc- ed by Ray Shanklin, assistant coun- ty agent, and each carried its ban- ners and led its stock. Clubs represented and their to ;al membership included the Beac Northern Lights, 17 members; Cal edonia Thrifty Workers, 17; Decor 3o Getteres, nine; French Cree Cloverleafs, 11, including the gran and reserve grand champion calves Glasgow-Hardies Creek Busybees Osseo Hale and Hardy, 31, an Hegg-WBShington Aces, 18. Also represented. with the Gales llle Marinuka Badgers, 23; Blai lldgeway Ramblers, 13; Blair Sun nyside Chariot, 22; Centervllle are Tri-School Workers, 43; French Husky Helpers, seven; French 'reek Wayside High -Flyers, seven Galesville Westway. 18, and all 4-H club, nine, Style Show Forty girls passed In review in Boy, Two, Run Over by Car Leaving Driveway Dresbach, Fu- neral services will be held Wednes- day for John Paul Borman, two- year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Borman, Dresbach, who -died of in- ternal injuries after being run over by a car driven by Lhc child's grand- father, Frank B. Borman. Services will be at p. m. at the Sletten-McGee Funeral home at La Crosse. Burial will'be In the Dresbach cemetery. The accident occurred at Uie Bor- man home here at p. m. Sun- day. The child died en route to St. Francis hospital, La Crosse. According to Information Dr. John Tweedy, acting Winonai county coroner, John Paul and sev- eral' other youngsters were playing n the backyard of the Bormnn home Sunday afternoon. When the grandfather got in his car to back out of the driveway which is on a slight slope, the children were told to move out o: the way. Believing that all of the children had moved out of the way, Mr Borman the driveway and struck the child. The boy was knocked down by the heavy car, a Packard sedan, and the right rear wheel of the vehicle passed over the body. In addition to Ills grandfather, John Paul is survived by his par- i and seven brothers and sisters. Framework Of The Coaches In which at least 35 holiday travelers were killed at Dugald, Manitoba, Canada, is set off by an exploding oil shed In the background. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald.) 448 Die in Accidents Over 3-Day Weekend By The Associated Press At least 448 persons died in violent accident? over the three- lay Labor day weekend. Trafllc mishaps accounted for by far the majority of the tragedies, with 290 persons dead In crashes on the nation's high ways. In addition, 81 persons drowned and 77 were killed Jn other accidents, Including 21 deaths All-Time Record Of See State Fair St. Dwight Elsenhower helped 'draw the cur- in plane crashes. The traffic toll was higher than the early estimate of 250 made by the National Safety council, but it was still well below the all-time La- bor day weekend traffic fatality fig- ure of 423 in 1041. In that year another 73 drowned and 125 died in miscellaneous violent mishaps, bring- ing the 1941 holiday's deaths to G21 Three Minnesota Victims Three persons were auto accident victims in Minnesota over the lengthy Labor day holiday weekend. Latest death was that of Frank Robinson, 19, Ely, killed .near that northeastern Minnesota community Monday when hig auto overturued on a highway. John B. Popesh, 30, also of Ely, a passenger in the 1020 nodel machine, was cut and bruised n the mishap. Other dead were: Martin Peterson, St. Paul, n rural Hennepin county while walking along a .highway near ollowing wire to Colonel Don Wll-Uast night's style show. They were helm, commanding the base here: "I was deeply honored by the ges- ure of the reserve training 'squad- on of the 137th A.A.F. bn.se unit In lying over the fairgrounds. I am rofoundly shocked and distressed o learn that as a result of the maneuver there were accidents, 'lease extend to the bereaved of hose lost my personal regret and eepcst sympathy." An army board of inquiry was to e convened today to study the ause of the mishap. Introduced by Yvonne Olson, coun- ty home demonstration agent. No winners are chosen In this, event. Sunday afternoonls program hon- ored Bert A. Gipple, oldest ex-sec- retary of tho fair, association and retired Galesville editor. Congressman Merlin Hull, intro- duced by Albert L. Twesme, gave the principal address. Mr. Gipple's energy Red Wing 14 2.6 Lake City C.3 Reads 12 3.4 Dani 4. T. W...... 4.5 Dam 5 T. W........ Darn 5A, T. W. 3.4 Wlnona (C.P.) 13 Dam C, Pool 10.1 Dam 6, T, W. 4.G Diikota (C.P.) 7.7 Dam 7. Pool o.D Dum 7, T. W..... 2.0 La Crosse 12 4.7 Tributary Streams Chippcwa at Durand. 2.0 Zumbro at Thcilmnn. 4.0 Buffalo above Alma.. Trempfalenu at Dodge 3.7 Black at Neillsvlllc... 3.4 Block Jit Galesville... 2.4 La Crosse at W. Salem 1.8 at Houston...... 6.8 .1 .1 .1 -H .4 -I- .3 .1 .1 .1 ,1 -H.6 -I-'.3 A Rites Held for 7 French Victims of Theater Fire Huell, bodies o 87 persons, burned to death in, movie theater fire, were burled her today after a communal funera service which drew persons in to the streets of this crepe-drapec Paris suburb. Hundreds of mourners, some o them bandaged survivors of the'fir last Saturday night in the Selec theater, walked behind the 13 trucks that carried the coffins to the ceme .cry. Fire Damages St. Charles Tire Shop St. Charles, Minn. A fire broke out In the oil pit of the Relsdorf Tire shop here at a. m. yesterday. It was extinguished by the fire department. Immediate origin of the blaze was undetermined. Damage was estimated at Drop in Wisconsin Turkey Crop Seen Madison, Wls. High feed prices, unfavorable weather condi- tions and uncertainty over fall mar- keting will result In a 20 per cent drop in Wisconsin's turkey crop this rear, the federal state crop report- ing service said today. He said that was a large factor in the building of the-fair associations and that "institutions may make men, but it takes men to make Institutions." Mr. Gipple'was presented with a portable radio. Mr. Olpple responded by recount- ng the early history of the fair and the struggles to keep It going. He called the 4-H department the "heart of the Other Winners Several additional Judging win ners were also announced todny. The grand champion boar and grand champion gilt are owned b; James Hovrc, Ettrick. Both are Du- roc Jerseys. In the Poland China boar com- petition, Arvid Stevenson, Galcs- ville, was the winner, with Bernard Redsten, Ettrick, the runner-up The same result also was posted in the Poland China gilt class. In the Duroc Jersey boar and gill classes, James Hovre, Ettrick. was the winner and Allen Bctz, Qales- ville, the number two man. Bennett Evenson, Ettrick, was the winner in the Chester White boar and gilt classes. Hamel, Frances Osinek, 68, Silver Lake tains Monday on a record Minne- atally hurt when she was thrown sota state fair which saw a car which blew a tire MacArthur Asks Tolerant Treaty For Japanese MacArthur observing the second anniversary o Japan's formal surrender, said to day his occupation policy of "right rather than might" had resulted In 'a minimum of fear, of confusion of unrest" In Japan, despite a criti- cally short economy. He, urged that a peace treaty for lie Japanese be drawn "In the same xjlerant.and Just atmosphere." The supreme commander, in public V-J day statement, said Ja- pan should not become a burden the economy of any other na- "on ter a peace treaty is reached He added: "This defeated country has the persons pass through the gates dur- ing its ten-day run. left the highway near there. At Pipcstone, Mrs. Jesse Evans About the Labor the family auto in time tc vo f A vtft fiiri-v rOi (1 rl TTHI 4ViSn econd best. Norman Dlercks, Fountain City, was winner In the gilt of any other >reed class, with Vernon Galesville, runner-up. Bell, In the barrow of any breed Judg- ng, James came out Irst, with Bennett Evensoh, Ettrick, econd. Havre, Ettrick, also had he best pen of four of any breed. Continued on Pace 4, Column 2) OALESVILLE FAIR Retaken in Milwaukee Jail ialls After Break Milwaukee Three county Jail prisoners last night escaped from their colls, slugged two jailers, then led 25 officers for a 20-mlnute chase -in the jail corridors before they were captured. Sheriff George Hanlcy said the trio slugged Jailers Bernard Kose- neck and Charles Wolf but the two recovered and sounded the alarm. Hanley Identified the prisoners as Russell Franken, 25, Milwaukee awaiting trial on charges of at- tempted murder; Albert Balogh, 22 Pensacola, Fla., recently sentenced for armed robbery, and Russell Griffith, 24, Milwaukee, awaiting trial on a. forgery charge. Police and sheriff's officers, some save herself and two children from possible injury after her 49-ycar-ok husband had collapsed and died a the wheel. Evans' home was a Jasper. Wisconsin counted at least 17 dead today, including six persons in two families, as a result of accidents in the state during the holidays. Worst of the highway tragedies occurred three miles south of Mat- toon where Mr. and Mrs. Otto Bre- dendick, route two, Wittenberg, anc their son, Ai'lin, two, were killec Sunday In a two-car collision. Six occupants of the other car escaped with a shaking up. Three persons i na Rico Lake family died of suffocation Sunday in a fire at their apartment. The dead were Sam Kcllerman, 35, his daughter, Kay, 13, and his son, Donny, JVi. Two Augusta men, Sidney E. Potts, 32, and Keith R. Stotts, 22. (Continued on Tage 9, Column 4) HOLIDAY DEATHS opportunity to become self-sustain- ing, rather than reduced to a condi- tion of mendicancy. A people given a fair chance will reach the niche in human society to which their own industry, their own skill and their own perseverance entitle them, without largess from others. "It is furthermore a false concept which contends that democracy can only thrive if maintained in plenty. On the contrary, history shows that it springs from hardship and strug- gle and toil." MacArthur said Japan is in no danger or Imminent economic col- apse. The war disrupted the coun- try to a point where "economic prostration was complete at the be- ;lnning of the but since he surrender, with the guidance of occupation forces, "Japan has been gradually restoring her shattered conomy and the curve is up, not down." MacArthur concluded: Special Rams Express; Fires Break Out Flames Spread to Oil Tanks; Heat Hampers Rescuers "If Japan in the post-treaty era s given a Just opportunity to live in rcedora and peace with her nclgh- ors In the community of nations :iere will be no threat to the sur- rfval and strengthening of the demo- ratic processes here inaugurated nder the occupation." rounded the seven corridors of the all. They cornered the trio and iad no difficulty in overpowering them. Vets Going to College Thii Fall The Veterans administration said today it expects World War II Veterans-to I go to college this ten per cent Increase over tho previous high .en- rollment-of last April. Manitoba, At least 35 persons were killed lost night, in a collision of a special train and a standing passen- ger express at the Dugald station. 20 miles cast of Winnipeg, Rescue crews clawed through burned, twisted wreckage of the two trains in an effort to extricate the dead and injured. The westbound vacation train smashed head-on into the express as tho latter discharging passengers. Two cars of the special train burst into flame immediately after collision. Gaye- Lewis, 64. of Trsascona, Man., engineer of the Canadian Na- tional Railways special which bringing Labor day holidaycrs homo from the Lake of the Woods rcsors, and Mrs. Albert Simpson of Winni- peg died en route to hospitals. How many more bodies might be juried in the charred wreckage of the coaches no one knew, but some if the estimates ran high. All the 'ictlms thus far were said to jecn aboard the special. Fifteen of whom had jecn aboard the resort oken to the hospital at St. Boni- acc. With a few exceptions lassengcrs aboard the transconti- cntnl train, bound from Vancouver o Toronto, escaped with nothing more than a shaking up. The special was said to have been traveling at about 30 miles an hour when it crashed into the standing express shortly before 10 p. m. The second car of the 13 In the special burst into flames at once and fire quickly spread, flrst to the other coaches and then to a grain elevator standing beside thn- track at this small flag stop. Later it fanned over to oil storage tanks nearby. Heat Inlcnxe Members of the few families which live in the vicinity of Dugald said the scene was a holocaust when they arrived. Flames were shooting- 50 feet In the air, they said, the -wo locomotives locked together and the baggage car of the trans- continental train had climbed part Three Minnesota reserve officers were killed Monday in the collision of two army AT8 training-planes as they circled for a landing at Wold-Chamberlain, field at Minneapolis after saluting General Dwlght D. Eisenhower at the Minnesota state lair. Rescue workers are shown trying to reach the bodies of two men trapped in half-burled wreckage of one ship. (AJP. Wlrephoto.) vrey Bp the tender. A steel baggage coach on the spe- cial remained upright but behind It coaches were slung craztly along Lhe right of way. The hcnt was so Intense that early attempts nt res- cue work had to be abandoned until help arrived. Ambulances, doctors, police and firemen and equipment raced to tho scene from Transcona, ten miles to the west, and from Winnipeg. Thry said they could see the red glare of the Somes while six miles away. The engineer of the transconti- nental train reportedly Jumped to safely. Oil Tanks Explode Some oil storage tnnks exploded, shooting flames hundreds of feet in the air. Luggage, canoes and Irappinss of vacationist.'-, were scattered over tracks. Firemen pumped streams of water on the biasing railway coaches from a ditch adjacent to the right of way. A few commandeered trucks anl later a line of ambulances brought the injured to Winnipeg and St. Boniface. Doctors and nunccs treat- ed many of the less severely Injured at the scene or at a railway clinic at Winnipeg. Only the most rerl- ously injured were hospitalized. Many of the survivors, some of them suffering- injuries, worked heroically with the rescue crews to reach those trapped in the wreck- age. They led many persons to safety before they were beaten bade by the intense hent. W. R. Devcnish. vice-president, western region, of the Canadian National Railways, said in a state- ment issued In Winnipeg that offi- cials of the line were at the scene and that a casualty list would be compiled when identification or vic- tims was completed. I   

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