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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, August 9, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - August 9, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER t.nral tunlcht nml StMidttjt hum Id. 121 DAYS Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations .VOLUME 47. NO. 147 W1NONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, AUGUST 9, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES Odom Reaches Japan; Alaska Lap Next Flying Boat Built at Loss, Hughes Says Will Leave U. S. If Plane Fails, He Tells Probers Washington Howard Hughes testified today that ho had "put the sweat of my life" into building his 200-ton flying boat and if it failure "I will leave the coun- try Hollywood plane bulkier took the sta.-id before the Senate war In- vcMicnii.'ig committee to deny that he had made any pro.'lt out or a S20.000.000 government contract to build the ship after the committee had barred testimony from Hugh J'ulton, Its former counsel. told reporters he wanted a chance to answer "certain fiil.se- that have gonr into the rec- ord tibout me." But Chairman Fer- guson iR.-Mich.i of the subcom- conducting hearings Into Hughes' operations ruled that Pul- ton could not testify. No I'ruflt ST.ator Pepper nskecl) JJuche.i if he expected to make any; out of constructing at 200-> '.or. f.ying boat. i "I don't see how I could hnvr.( Senator." the witness replied, "since! iiny profit specifically was prcclud- fd in thr contract. It's as plain, us the nose on your face that a loss had to be sustained." The Hughes i-lane, constructed under wartime contracts, has not brrn flown. Royal German Gem Theft Probed by U. S. Officials By Richard Kasischke Berlin U. S. criminal investigation agents disclosed to- day they were hunting worth of Jewels belonging to the Kite widow of Kaiser Wllhelm II, which her son said vanisned last June from a trunk In which he had them hidden in the American sector of Berlin. The agents said the owner of the gems Princess H e r m 1 n c von Schoonalch-Carolath, who died Thursday at Frankfurt-an-dcr-Oder Train Blasted In Holy Land Jerusalem The crack "Egypt bound from Cairo to Haifa with British troops returning from leave, was blasted of! the tracks by a mine at Wllhelmlna, near Lydla. today, an official report said. The engineer and fire- man were burled beneath the debris, The army said, however, that no military casualties resulted. The mine, which the official announcement attributed to the Jewish underground, blew four coaches off the tracks. The same train was attacked by bombs and gunfire three months ago and five persons were klHed and a score wounded. in-the Russian zone had spirit- ed 95 pieces of jewelry worth an estimated to her son. Prince Ferdinand, in the U. S. zone. They said a young German wom- an friend of the prince "risked her neck" to smuggle the collection out of the Russian zone In a valise to Threshing Mishap Kills Farm Youth Theilman Boy's Body Found Near Rack Wabasha, Minn, (Special) Thrown from a hayrack on which le was taking bundles to a thresh- ng rig on the August Eggenbergcr "arm two miles north of Theilman xbout 4 p. m. Friday, Lloyd Baker, 0 years old, was fatally injured. ____ Baker was a member of the com- who "was" to" convcrTthc munlty threshing crew. His father's President Weekending At Shangri-La Thurmont, Md. Presi- dent Truman, taking it easy in his Catoctin mountain lodge near here after a strenuous week, slept until m, to- after his usual early rising hour. Enjoying his second straight weekend in the presidential hideaway, Mr. Truman break- fasted with Mrs. Truman, read newspapers on the terrace, and at 10 a. m, set out for his daily walk. After dinner last night, the Trumans saw a motion pic- ture, "Carnegie with musi- cal features, and retired at 11 p. m. They were having fine weather. A.vr the of -K'an. Ferguson wanted to know Stuck Up? Indonesia Appeals To U. S. to Spur Dutch Withdrawal Jogjakarta, Java President Socfcarno asked the American people Friday to support the Indonesian republic's demands for a withdrawn! of Dutch valuables Into cash for investment in hotel and other interests in west- ern Germany. However, Ferdinand told investi- gators, before he could dispose of the Jewels, 29 of the "best worth about vanished from the trunk in which he had them locked. Motley Suspects to un- ravel the encountered a maze of Intrigue Involving fortune tellers, characters from the Berlin underworld and persons of half a dozen nationalities, including an unidentified American civilian In whose house Ferdinand with his 'million dollar a guest 'or a short period. Here are the highlights of the story, as related by the army agents: The 34-year-old Ferdinand, who resided part time In the U. S. sec- tor of Berlin, came to the attention of police earlier this year when it became known he had sold a neck- lace worth rclchmarks at the military rate of ex- farm is adjacent to the Eggenberger place on the Theilman-Lake City road. About a block from the threshing rig the temporary road went down a hill. While the hayrack was going, down the hill the tongue broke and' the rack was thrown on top of the horses. No one saw the accident but Lloyd apparently was thrown off the ____ __ ..___ _. rack nnd was crushed under.it orjtiny, single-engined planes piloted by former army fliers took today Pilots Take Off For Global Trip In Cub Planes Telerboro, N, pair of under one of the horses. Wabasha County Coroner E. B Wise, whose office investigated the accident, said an Inquest would be unnecessary. Members of the threshing crew didn't know about the accident until the horses came to the machine without the hayrack. On investi- gating they found the overturned rack with Baker's body beside it. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Baker, Lloyd was born on the family farm October 11, 192G. He was ser- iously Injured five years ago in a fall down a haychute and at that time was hospitalized for five years. Survivors besides his parents are from Indonesia. j In written answers to questions .submitted to him during nn Inter- view, the Indonesian leader de- clared that the Dutch military units were "armed by the Unltec Nations to fight the Japanese and not to fight the Indonesians In an all-out colonial war." the size of the flylnc boat was1 "Americans also fought for their chancrd from to Sockarno said. "In the last World war Americans wore champions of liberty and democ- racy. We Indonesians for 40 years trxLlflrtl today that lie drridrcl upon rntrrtulnmrnt fnr und other impor- tant rovrrnmrnt aftrr hr Jrarnri] thr.v hiitl ;i "haired" for him as "bclnj; stuck pounds. H bcr. said he did riot remern- I-Vrcuson want--cl to know ,bt'cn struggling for freedom .he nrmv arid navy had approved i democracy. We appeal to the the design changes, and to, R .struggle with sympathetic interest." wild lie dltln't think so. The chapman whclhrrnny-j Report Attack one contacted Kovernmen fin behalf of HtiKhes to obtain the contract originally. on East Java Outpost IJaUtvIn, Dutch 'Certain of my engineers were nrmy that 300 armed In- and supplied certain pre- liminary design he OavHfd Down Chairman Ferguson (R.-Mlch.l n.' subcommlUoe Inquiring Into Howard Huches S40.00D.OOO war- time plane contracts, gnvrled clown an attempt by Fulton to make a .vtajorntnt. Fulton, who served the commit- tee as counsel when President Tru- man, then a senator, wus its chair- man, .shouted that he would iny case to the pres.s." IJrewxter produced before the i committee this week a memoran- dum of George Mender, former counsel, saying Fulton had approached him and attempted to h.'ive the investigation contracts limned to the iisperrtr, of the case. Th" memorandum said Fulton ad- viwci nenlnst making any rccnrrimiTidixtlnn to the committee, but leave >.nlely in Hrewstcr the de- cision whether the group would KO nhciic! with the Inquiry Into Hushes' activities. B.-ewsu-r testified that he bcllcv-! ed this was an effort to "lay a trap for .-nc." inasmuch as Hughes la- ter had accused him of offering to ciii: off the inquiry if Hughes would doneslan republicans had attackc a Dutch outpost near Socrnbaju East Java, and others had attempl e.d infiltrations elsewhere In Jav despite a cease-fire order whlc went into effect last Monday mid night. In addition, the Dutch declared the Indonesians were continuln; scorched earth tactics around Sc marang. on the north central coas of Java, where estates were re ported ablaze. Dutch patrols operating through out the D Iturcd and This necklace, investigators were told, had been brought him from hJs mother by the woman emissary During June, the young woman told authorities, she made another trip to Frankfurt to visit Hermlnc This time she said she brought back the valise filled with jewels which she took to Ferdinand. Ferdinand, she said, placed the gems In a large trunk given liftn by his American friend........ "He locked tho she said, 'and made certain that he always carried on his person the two keys that fit the lock. They were tied on a single string." Key Missing Shortly after this, investigators said, the prince thought he was be- ng shadowed by Russian agents To throw them oft the track he de- cided to change his residence fre- flvc sister, Mrs. William Counter, Disco, Wis., Mrs. Harold Rohrman, South St. Paul. Mrs. Wayne Evans, St. Paul, Mrs. Donald Page, South St. Paul and Mrs. Perl Grogan, Lake City and one brother, George, at home. The body was taken to the Wise undertaking parlors at Wabasha. Funeral services will be at St. Pat- rick's church at West Albany Mon- day at a .m. with burial at Lake City. "mounts destroyed considerable arms and ammunition the communique said, and put a stop to "looting and The Netherlands navy announced attempted that its losses, Including marines of the 15 days of fighting ended by Monday's truce, numbered 15 dead nine wounded and two missing. Todd County Death May Have to ii merger of his TWA air- hue with fan-American Airways. Transatlantic Radio Operators Strike Averted Prairie, Minn. ty Attorney Frank King today said there "were strong Indications" that Mrs. Frederick A. Zappc. 60, Brow- ervllle farm woman, believed vlc- (Im of (i slnycr, had committed suicide, Mrs. body found In Peat lake Tuesday with a sack, containing a length of steel rail, quently by making short visits with friends. Wherever he went he car- ried the treasure-laden trunk. Then, one day, upon returning to his lodgings, Ferdinand told police he discovered that most valuable parts of his treasure had disap- peared, along with relchs- marks (about Glancing at the string on which he always kept the keys he saw that one was missing. The prince sought his American friend for advice and the latter advised him to call the police. The investigators said that when they were called in they found the remaining Jewels partly in the over- turned trunk and partly in a small suitcase on the table in the prince's room. To keep them safe they took them into custody and they are now n a U. S.-guardcd repository at Frankfurt-on-Maln in the American 3 Missing After Plane Crashes in N. Y. East River New York Three airline employes were presumed today to have perished in the crash and sinking of an American airlines radar experimental plane which plunged into the East river while cfareTthe attempting an emergency landlngjln recognition of the nation's ef- takeofl from to break the economic crisis. Woman, 75, Wed To Stepson, on a flight around the first attempt of planes ot less than 575 horse-power to make the circuit. The 100-horsepower cub planes followed one another down the Teterboro airport runway, the first becoming airborne at a. m. and the second two min- utes later. The Truman, 39, of Los Angeles, a former army flight nstructor, and Clifford .V. Evans, 26, of Washington, D. C., who flew n the China-Burma-India theater during the yesterday they expected the trip to take 200 to 220 flying hours and from 30 to 45 days. The planes, which have a cruising speed of 100 miles per hour, are equipped to carry 138 gallons of gasoline, 100 more than the cub's normal Joad. First stop on their route is Goose Bay, Labrador, where they hope to land tonight. Other stops are planned in Greenland, Iceland, Eng- land, Europe, Egypt, India, Burma, Bombshell Skips Stop At Shanghai Pilot From Chicago Starting Point Tokyo William P. Odom. bidding for a new arouad-the- world Slight record, landed his con- verted A-26 Bombshell at Yokota Airfield. 30 miles west of Tokyo, at- a. m. Sunday. p. m., Sat- urday 48 hours and 35 ninutes out of Chicago. His route will take him next to Alaska. Odom and his Hying Bombshell plane passed over Shanghai with- out slopping and headed for Tokyo at p. m. tonight, a. m. at an altitude of 1S.OOO feet. Odom was expected to reach To- kyo in about two hours and 45 min- utes. When he passed over Shanghai he was 44 hours and 50 minutes out of Chicago, where he had taken oS at p. m. C.D.T., Thursday in an effort to halve the old solo around-tho-world record of Uic late Wiley Post. Odom's decision to fly direct from Calcutta to Tokyo without stop- ping at Shaighni was not known until he swept over this city in a stnrry but moonless sky. Since early afternoon lie had been awaited at Lunghwa airdrome on the western outskirts of the city. As lie drew r.car, the runway was outlined with Hares, and lunch for the filer and fuel for his plane were ready, but Odom reported by radio .hat he would not land. There was Rood wc.at.hrr nil tho vay to Tokyo, with :i favoring wind. Forecasts said Hying conditionj icross the Pacific were excellent. China, Japan and the Aleutians. They said they planned to fly to- gether so that "If one of us goes down the other can either radio or fly to the nearest stop and report his position." MacArthur Thanked for Emergency Food Release Tetsu Kata- yamn thanked General MacArthur ;oday for an emergency release of mported food for distribution to cities short of rations. Calling up- on the Japanese to Join him in expressing thanks, Katayama de- Gasolinc In A Bulk Storage tank at Frazee, Minn., js consumed In a fire which was still under guard today. Firemen from four com- munities battled the blaze, which was ignited yesterday after a car ran Into a gasoline pump. (A.P. Wlrephoto.) Frazee Firemen Stay on Guard; Wind Saves Town iuardla Field. Airline spokesmen said two mem- bers -of the five-man crew were by a police launch shortly before the plane settled in about 40 feet of water last night. All the rew were New York residents. occupation zone to await disposi- tion of Hermlnc's estate. Urowd Cheers As 7atally Injured Auto Racer Walks cheer of relic: vent up from a stadium crowd o: ,000 spectators last night when Tank Staubcr, 32, climbed from he wreckage of his midget auto and took 40 paces to an nmbu- ince. They didn't rcallxe it, but they crc watching a dying man walk. Staubcr's car had crashed through Toronto Lifeguards Threaten Strike Toronto's 54 city Ifcguards threatened to strike today or a 20 per cent wage increase. Pay for lifeguards now ranges from S105 to a month. They want pay equality with the super- visors of playgrounds in city paries. Trade Pact London The ministry of food announced today conclusion of a three-year trade agreement with Hungary under which the Hungar- ians will supply some of the im- ports of bacon, eggs and lard that Britain formerly bought from the United States. Frazce, were standing guard early today to pre- vent renewal of a raging fire which yesterday consumed gallons of gasoline when freakishly touched off by an automobile backed into a pump. Damage l.o a bulk tank where the gasoline was the pump and a small 'Nobody Like Gable' Britons Bewail Film Ban Soviet Honors Jet Designer Moscow Andrei N. Tupolev. Soviet plane designer whose newest jet aircraft were featured in last Sunday's air show, has been given the rank of lieutenant general Jn the aviation engineering .service. Russian newspapers today print- ed six separate orders and decrees honoring Tupolev and members or his designing bureau, which Is ob- serving its 25'Ji anniversary. The bureau was decorated with the order of Lenin, and Tupolev's oilier assistant, A. A. Arkliangelski, was made a hero of socialist la- bor. Tupolev and several other nembers of the bureau were made lonored workers in science and technics of the Soviet republic. Tupolev figured in the news it decade ago when two planes he de- signed flew over the Arctic from tho Soviet union to California, During ,he war TupoJev's bombers wero used by the Soviet air forces. plus cost or the gasoline itself, was! New consternation esimated at more than S3.000 byi both movle.goers and lead- I Normal Ponto. manager of of Murnhvsboro III The Elevator Company Mtirpnysboro, in. ine owncci the property. n._ mrth husband of 75-vear-old Jn Ulc New York- radio of cijM'rulfirs Amcncun ovrrscas airlines planes w.i.'. iivi-rtcci when an agreement was early on procedures for (letennuiiiiK the i.sstie under J'.Ut Tlir members of fliitii: communications officers as- an affiliate of the A.F.L. Commercia; Telegraphers union, threatened to strike against a com- par.y decision to use only one In- j.'.ead of f.vo radio men on its nights. The union .-.aid that Us members tied to her body with an Ironing! a canvas retaining wall in the Han- jcord. Her husband and a 20-year- j .son park stadium, and a stout rope j rtimci.tnrmfl i. i __ 4 _ L. by authorities. him across the throat, break- iiouic; not u-orl: requiring 11 M.'iKlc operator to work more than 1- houi'.s, N. D. Wheat Harvest Slated Next Week I'argn. N. of King said an Investigation by hlmfii'lf. Sheriff Ralph Kamphcnkcl and state crime bureau agents, late yesterday unearthed two attempt: within the tho last few weeks by Mrs, Zappc to take her own life. "Pathological findings sustain the conclusion that Mrs. Zappe died of heart King said, ac- counting for the lack of water found In her lungs. A coroner's Jury previously found Mrs. Zappc was beaten to dcnth. Strike Threatens Goodrich Rubber Akron, Ohio Representatives of Ruboer Dakota's bumper wheat cropj Workers today threatened to str. be K'-ne.ral In state durliiR: August 19 at seven nation-w: coming Week, Mate production and marketing ad- director, said today. According to reports from County strike wide John Rasper.) plants of the B. F. Goodrich Com- AAA chairman, cutting of feud creases! pany unless the firm agrees to bar- gain upon a company-wide uniform working contract and wage in- wlll be complete another iveek or ten days If htimv.t weather prevails. The walkout actually would begin August 14 and be completed August 19 at the final date of expiration of of this week ranged'the. union's current working agrcc- jing his neck nnd virtually shutting off his breathing. He elide in the nimtlancc after gasping, "I can liai'clly breathe." An attending physician, said the oxygen in Slaubcr's lungs and blood stream probably enabled him to walk to the ambulance, with the aid of attendants. Stauber. a Chicago machinist, ts fourth husband of 75-year-old Mrs. Mabel Genevleve Pitts ts a 39-year-old stepson by her third marriage. The slight little bride and Vic- tor Robert Pitts were honey- mooning today in a two-room frame cottage after their mar- riage Thursday in the parson- age of the First Lutheran church. "All my other husbands died, so I thought I'd get me a young man this she said. Mrs. Pitts said that her new husky, six-foot husband was presently unemployed and that she hoped to obtain work to sup- plement her monthly old age pension. Her third husband died two years ago. Weather FEDERAL FORCASTS For Winona and vicinity: Partly ivlnd dustry's decision to suspend 1m- loudy to cloudy witli occasional )o- the export of nil feature cal showers tonight and film industry on both .tlnntic followed today _ of the American in- Only a fortunate southeast wind] kept the giant blowtorch from raz-jmcamlciv lnc n 01 nll ing the entire town, located ten "and short subjects to Bri- Continued warm and rather humid. miles southwest of Detroit Lakes.I, h Low tonight 72; high Sunday 90. Ponto said the fire started when u ,___ ,__ WEATHER FORECASTS Marvin Mindcrman, 18, of Frazee accidentally backed his car into the pump, breaking off the supply pipe. Gasoline under great pressure spurted up and apparently was ig- nited by a short circuit in the in in The bnn is in retaliation for the new British t.ax which the industry estimates would take away 75 pci cent of UK earnings of American films shown in British theaters. The suspension, was announced electrical wiring of the pump. Mindcrman said the car instant- ly "was full of flame" so dense he was unable to see a companion, Walter Winslow, 19, of Spokane, Wash., seated beside him. Win- slow's loot was burned as the two yesterday by Eric A. Johnston, president of the Motion Picture Association of America, after a three-hour closed meeting here of 50 leaders of the industry. The tax was announced by Great Britain as a means of helping com- umpcd from the flaming machine.'bnt' thnt The car, an old model, was badly nl-d described by Johnston in .damaged. Rain Gives Temporary Crop Relief; New Heat Wave Moving Into Area This moniliiR's driving rainstorm 1.35 Inches in Winona only short-lived relief to crops and humans. A new, sparing icat wave was moving into the irea curly this afternoon. The rain, which continued here rom C to 8 a. m., was widespread n the immediate area but did not bring sufficient relief to crops, said :ounty agents. The rainfall in Winona proper survived by his wife and four chil- was heavier than in neighboring dren. Convict Escapes From Still water; State Alerted Stlllwatcr, Minn. (IP) Charles Ray Farrell, 28, serving a grand larceny term, walked away from ;he Minnesota state prison farm 'ast night, officials reported. Farrell had 18 months left of a seven-year sentence, imposed on him n Ramsey county district court De- cember 1C, 1942, for the burglary of music store In that city. His ad- dress at that time was St. Paul. Prison officials said his absence was discovered about p. m. I areas of Southern Minnesota and Western Wisconsin, and was ac- companied by electrical disturb- ance's, Rain full In Winona, Wabasha, JTrempcalcau, Buffalo, Houston, Ipcpin and Flllmorc counties. There was no rain In Preston, but light- ning struck a barn near Mabel, Minn. The mercury reached a maximum 91 Friday afternoon, dropped to but was back tn iju.'.ln'In per ncrc with D. F, Goodrich a state-wide alarm was broad- In seven states, the International least. Ho was described as six feet, policy committee of Goodrich three inches tall and weighing Hoth were of to ex- quality. U.R.W.A. locals reported. "Mabout_lflO pounds. ,a statement as a measure which "in i effect strangles American film shipments to England." "If the British do not want American pictures. that's one thing." Johnston said. "If they do, they .shouldn't expect lo Kot a dol- lar's worth of films for a In London, harried theater man-: tigers predicted that hundreds of icinenm houses pi'obablv would close A recent trip by Mr. Mlndrum quality corn sold at a higher prici ot Uic snortnKe of pictures. Minnesota: Partly cloudy. Scat- tered showers or thundcrshowers north tonight and over most of state Sunday. Warmer extreme east and cooler northwest Sunday. Wisconsin: Partly cloudy '.onisht with scattered showers or thunder- showers north. Warmer west. Sun- day fair and warmer followed by local thundcrshowers northwest '.ate Sunday afternoon or niizht. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 91; minimum. 65; noon, 83; precipitation. J.35; sun sets to- light at sun rises tomorrow U, to 83 at noon today. revealed corn in this area to be Jn better shape than in bordering Minnesota areas nnd northern Iowa counties. Mr. Mlndrum believes the ralnfal also aided the potato crop anc the new legume scedings planted this spring. Further evidence corn in this area is in better shape than else- where was provided by Congress- man August H. Andresen, just re- turned from Washington, who has Just completed a tour in this scc- ;lon. He says corn here looks better ;han that in the fields between ;hc capital" and Minnesota. He :ound corn in some fields in Ohio, [ndlana and Illinois was not yet ,n tassel. A new heat wave now covering Montana and the Southern plains states is scheduled to spread over entire area between the Mis- river and the Rocky Moun- ,taln region this afternoon and ex- The weather will continue hot eastward tomorrow. humid tonight and Sunday, the government forecast said today, with occasional thundcrshowers tonight Temperatures are expected to soar above the 100 mark in many localities, bringing new corn-wither- than wheat. Corn soared much as cents 11 bushel, the limit permitted in a single session, marking up new set ot all-time records. Wheat and oats were nlso very strong. The September corn contract, sole at up eight cents, a all-time high for any corn future In the cash market, yellow corn brought as much as a bushel more than ten cents higher than the August, 1917, record, which had stood until yesterday. In the last 24 hours, fair weather continued over most of the nation, except for a few showers and thun- dershowers. The hoc weather which developed yesterday in Montana and in the irca from South Dakota and south- ern Arkansas southward to the iulf of Mexico forced many tem- peratures to 100 degrees or higher n that region. High readings included 108 at Mc- Alester, Okla.; 107 at Pierre, S. D.; Dallas, Texas, and Ponca City, Okla.; 06 at Shrcveport, La., and 105 at Miles City, Mont. Bemidji Chicago Denver 96 Des Moines 95 Duluth GS Max. IVt. 70 ci.'t .Sfi M Kansas City Los Angeles Paul New Orleans Phoenix Scnulo Britain produces only -15 films a year. Somo Britons, nlrendy short on, food, beer nnd other consumers Roods, were irate to hear that they; were (.o be deprived altogether of Hollywood films. "This is the last said an electrical engineer's wife. "GoinglRcd Wing to the films is the only recreation lLake City I if they take away! Reads 97 3! ii5 9fi 102 7-1 R8 S8 .01 .50 ray American films, well, I'm patriotic nnd all that, but there's nobody like Clark Gnble in British pic- KIVKR BIJU.KTIN Flood Stage 2-1-Hr. Stage Todny Change 2.5 .1 (i.O .1 32 -s.l 2.4 Dam -I, T.W. Dam 5. T.W. Dam 5A, T.W. Winona On the oilier hand, some critics. Dam 6, Poo] who accuse Hollywood ind some parents and teachers, who charge U. S. films with pro- Dnm ii, T.W. Dakota Dam 7. Pool niotinc juvenile delinquency and Dam 7. T.W. >oor English, were happy over the j La Crosse. Lake Delavan Yields Body Delavan. Wis. The body of John H. Nolan. 24, of Chicago. Readings of .is high .as lio weroja passenger aboard one of the two and Sunday. Low tonight will be 72 weather to the Midwest, just and high Sunday, 90. Norman C. Mlndrum, Winona county extension agent. Lcwiston, said the rain helped both corn and pastures but that much more is needed to mature the com fully. recovering from a four-day hot spell. orccast for South afternoon. Dakota thisLspecdboats which collided on Delavan Wednesday night was rc-j .S.-i 10.1 7. 9.-I 3.7 Tributary SI reams Chippewa ut 2.1 .1 Zumbro at Theilman.. 1.8 Buffalo above Alma___ 2.2 Black at Neillsville.... 2.4. Black at Gnlesville 2.1 .1 La Crosse at W. Salem 1.4 Root at Houston ......5.9 IUVKR FORKCAST (From St. Paul to Lock Ten) Moderate rains in the central Relief from the hot weather morrow will be mostly confined to niRht by Wnlworth portion of this district will cause Corn was bringing new and western North Da- high prices on the Chicago Board of Trade because of this prolonged dry, hot weather. Yesterday, best kota. Sunny and dry weather will be the rule in the central portion of the country. county deputy sheriffs who had some adjustments of gates with been drugging the lake since early Thursday. Still missing was Mrs. Ruth Kal- Icnbach. 19, also of Chicago. slight rises at failwater gauges from Trempenleau to Genoa. Elsewhere there will be little change the next 48 hours.   

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