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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: August 5, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - August 5, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER ClfHtdj and i-oolrf with l lorfnoom. Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations 117 DAYS Iwimmlmr EukllBf VOLUME 47, NO. 143 W1NONA, MINNESOTA. TUESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 5, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES U.S. Allots City For Airport Ford Plant Walkout Averted Contract to Be Worked Out Over Period of Year Detroit The Ford Moto Company and C.I.O. Unite Auto Workers, nvrrtlnw n strike the IHh hour, ncrcrcl tocliiy to tr to work out their dispute uncle the Titft-Hurtley Iiiw if It takes year's time. The agreement, announced 1 detail nt it. m., .staved off walkout of production work rrs which had been nchcdulcd to noon. Further, n Joint compnny-unlon statement said, the union will no be Hable for breach of contract "be cause of any utrlko or work stop- pace" during this year's period. "The company." said the stntC' ment, "will not Institute any sul1 iiRalnst the union, Its and members In such event." In addition, the U.A.W.-C.I.O was Riven the "rtuht to strike" on ihe is.sue If no solution were forth- rorninff after "a year of deliberation and neKOtintions." The year's grace to the union from damrtKe'suH under the new law will be dated from the date of the ForcI-U.A.W. contract sr ill to be drawn. NeRotlatlons on other contract including the reported OOO.OOO-a-year workers' pension plan, will resume Thursday, both sides said. The Ford-TJ.A.W. statement ex- pressed the "confidence" of com- pany and union officials that the remaining Issues could be solved "wlihln 11 relatively short time." Immunity IMMIC A strike aRaln.sl Ford had been threatened In ari effort, to enforce I he union's demand for a con- tractual clause KlvtnK It Immunity from the Taft-Harllcy penalty provisions. The law permits an employer to tut a union tor In event of a violation of Its contract with manftKement. This the U.A.W. has souKht to avoid by private contract in all current negotiations. Press headquarters was Riven the joint statement a full ten hours nrter n "verbal" compnny-unlon ncrecment, accordinK to sources on both sides, had been reached the iiicht before. CalllnK the agreement over the Taft-Hiirtley dispute n "compro- mise." the stntemen1; set It forth In a series of eight points. Summarized, these call for the following procedure: A four-mini from the union, two from tho company will he named to "work out n solu- tion to the question Ot the liability the union, its officers and mem- bers, for damages by suit for breach of contract." Chcxwr Fifth Member If the committee Is unable to arrive jit mi fifrrcpment within thre? months from (he "date of it will choose u fifth member and "continue Its efforts for an additional three-month per- iod If necessary." If It takes still longer the com- mittee may continue on a majority of Its five members. The fifth member fihnll be the umpire under the Ford-U.A.W. contract If the. committee has been unable to agrcci on another party. Any committee solution must be unanimous. It will be binding upon both company and union. If the committee falls to aftree, ihf U.A.W. is permitted to icopcn direct negotiations on the Issue but the "total time" spent in delibera- tions and neKotlatlons "shall exceed one year in all." Council Asks Prairie Island Road Bids Plans for New Airport Dike Approved Bids for the construction of a Tel Aviv Mayor, 3 Others Taken in British Raids Political Leaders Taken in Arrests In Palestine By Carter Davidson Jerusalem British author- tics arrested dozens of Jewish po- ell. Tel Aviv, Ramat Gan Pctnk 'in voting to advertise for bids for Jlkvahand a series of Republican-Herald photos It HIM Often Been Said that the best way to keep cool is not to talk about the heat. The Wlnona youngsters In the photos above have discovered nn even better way to beat the heat. Filling one's stomach with cold ice cream while sitting near the cold Kprny from n fountain In Central park IB one of the ways Dennis Johnson, top picture, has of keeping cool. A lack of clothes also helps. Dennis IH the year-nnd-a-half-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley John.ion. 7514 West Third street. If one doesn't have a fountain and pool handy, a garden hose with a spray attachment makes a nice, though slightly cold, shower. While Cheryl Miller, left in the lower photo, appears quite happy about the cold spray on her, Jimmy Ounn is not quite certain whether he likes to be cooled so abruptly. Cheryl is the daughter of Mrs. Ruth Miller, West End cabins, and Jimmy is the son of Mr. and .Mrs. Irvln Ounn, 1010 West Fifth iilrcct. .his project Monday night the coun- cil took the flrst concrete action to- ward securing the three civic im- provements for which bond issues were approved by the people at 'the election last April. Plans for the new road, which were approved by the council last night, call for construction of an all-weather road giving year-around access to a residential and recrea- tional area besides fulfilling its pri- mary function: A dike for the new municipal airport. The location of the road will be approximately the same, except that after the left turn near the cottages it would run slightly farther south and parallel to Straight slough. It will be between dawn raids today climaxing two weeks of Jewish underground, vio- lence in the Holy Land. An official statement said the raids were "part of the campaign against terrorism." Among those arrested were most members of the Tel Aviv municipal council and many leaders of the Rcvionist by the Pal- estine government last year of be- .ng the forerunner of Irgun Zvai Deuml, Jewish extremist organiza- ;ion. 60 Slated For Arrest A government spokesman, who said the arrests were made under 'defense emergency declared that "approximately GO" persons had been marked down !or detention but that "some may Legation Official Rescues American Jailed in Hungary By Jack Guinn Budapest An American for criticizing Hungarian in U. S. custody today after cscap- ins from three political policemen with the aid of an American legation official while his captors were transferring him from one 400 and 600 feet from the slough. !nave got wind of it and taken Parking Areas 'cover." The call for bids includes con- A complete list of those detained struction of three parking areas be- was not Immediately available, but tween the road and Straight slough, it WBs reported to include a number In the election last April a bondiof members of Hagana who have Issue of for the Prairie opposed that organization's recent Island road was authorized, and It stand against the terrorist tactics Is tho plan of the council to open'of Irgun Zvai Leuml and the Stern bids August 22 but to delay a ward-i gang Hirohito Visits Coal Mine, Asks More Production Yumoto, Japan Per- spiring freely. Emperor Hirohito descended feet into the hot workings of the Joban coal mine today and exhorted the miners to greater output. The miners usually wear only G-strlngs while laboring in the intensely hot shafts but today they donned shorts in deference to their imperial visitor. It was the flrst time a Jap- anese ruler had entered a mine shaft. Hirohito trudged around for nearly 30 minutes, inspect- ing the ore and encouraging the miners. His swcat-sogged white linen suit clung to his body as he left the mine. jail to another. American officials identified the American as Stephen Thuransky, 54, formerly a farmer near Colum- bus, Ohio, and a naturalized Ameri- can. They said his escape took place lost Saturday outside the Marko jail when Thuransky made a break for freedom. In the melee Thuransky was reported to have knocked down one of his three guards, while his wife grabbed a second. The third (knocked Thuransky unconscious and he fell into the rear1 scat of an American legation car parked in front of the jail. Stood and Stared A U. S. official who had been waiting to see the prisoner, pushed Asphalt Mat On Runway Now Assured Relief From Heat Promts In Area Tonight, Wednesday ing of the bids until after the sale of the bond issue, which will probably be early in September The contract award cannot be made until funds arc available. The road will be conslxuctcd to n evel of 001 feet, approximately two feet above tho recorded high water mark, and would run from the crossing at the Wcstlield Golf club o the dam 5A dike, afc o point where the dike turns to the north. Quantity estimates include: cubic, yards of flllc for the road, 'Which will a 30-foot top; cubic yards of shouldering, employ- Ing dirt purposes; Wo square yards of "blactf top-'for the road; cubic yards of fill for three parking lots; i'180 cubic yards of shouldering- for parking Mfoorhead Motorist, Stalled on Tracks, Gets Push From Train Moorhcud, Minn. D. W. King, an off-duty Great Northern railway fireman, was in a qunndrny yesterday after- noon when he accidentally backed his auto off the edge of a raised crossing, stalling the ma- chine In the path of a fast mall train. Thlnklne fust, King waved down the train and asked the engineer to nudge his car loose with the engine. The locomotive cased ahead, pushed King's car off the tracks uncl proceeded on its way, five minutes behind schedule. not State Roads Need Hoffman Says St. mllo trunk highway system will re- quire the expenditure of over a period of ten years merely to bring It up to par. Highway Com- missioner M, J. Hoffmann declared Monday. Such a procrnm, he told members of the IcKlslutlvc interim highway committee, could be financed out of present revenues. He added that current low interest rates might mtiko bond tounnce seem attractive unite men were killed nenr but said increased construction hrre at dnwn today when u would counterbalance any in- terest saving. The bond Issue proposal was ad- vanced by Representative B. G. Novnk, St. Paul, who suggested the proceeds be used to hard'service the 3.300 miles of the trunk system that nre now only gravelled. Hoffmann said there ore Insistent Relief from -the three-day heat wave which broke R two-year rec- ord in Wlnona Monday afternoon when the mercury reached 99 and a fraction and which threatened to go even higher today, is due here late tonight, said the government weather bureau. The' official prediction for the Wlnona area is partly cloudy to- night and Wednesday, scattered local showers late tonight or Wed- Announcement of the dawn raids followed days of speculation that! the British might take drastic ac- tion to curb underground violence which reached a new peak losl week when Irgun Zvai Leuml hanged two kidnaped British ser- (Contlnucd on Pace 10, Column 8) BRITISH RAIDS Phone Company To Submit Brief s On Rate Increase Duluth.- The Northwestern Bell Telephone Company was or- lots, and square" yards of black! dered to submit briefs within 20 top for parking lots. In addition, days as hearings ended here Mon- ti reinforced concrete bridge will be day on its application for nn nvcr- constructcd across Crooked slough, age 27 per cent boost in rates In slightly north of its present several culverts will be laid, After the firm's briefs in sup- riprapping will be done and several acres of land will be cleared. Gates In Bridge, The bridge will include gates, nec- essary to prevent back-watering ol the Mississippi during high stages. The advertisement calls for per unit price bids except on the bridge !or which lump sum bids are asked. Contractors are given the privilege of bidding only, on the nil, clearing nesday forenoon. Cooler tonight !and culverts, or on the bridge or on and Wednesday. The low tonight'the bituminous work. They may will be 72, said the forecast, and bid on the entire job, too. 19 Texans Killed In Truck Crash Nlne- 17 Negroes find two :n which they were riding collided n gasoline truck nnd burned. Ambulances from Waxnhnchle und made runs to the scone, bodies of the victims to a temporary morcuc nt n Necro then IT here. Officers Mild they did nnt know immediately how many were in jurrd. Truffle on f.hr hlchtvity to Dnllnn, 30 miles to the north, hud to be rerouted. Child at Injured Fntnlly by Car the high Wednesday 82. Last night also was the hottest here this season with the mercury going no lower than 79. Late Monday afternoon It reach- id 99.3 and at noon today it was degree lower than noon Monday. Hottest weather last year oc- curred August 17 when the maxi- mum was 96 and the minimum a cool 63. Monday's record heat was he highest here since the three- day hot spell in September, 1945. At that time the maximum Sep- tember 6 was 99 and the minimum 75, On September 7 it reached a high of 08 and low of 69 while on September 8 the high was 07 and tho low 72. By the fourth day the high was 81 and at night the tem- perature dropped to 59. Minnesota nnd the Dakotns start- ed off another work day today with high early morning temperatures nnd n promise of heat equalling record temperatures of yesterdny. New Ulm recorded the state's high Monday with 105, Park Ra- pids, St. Cloud and Campbell each had 103. Duluth was the only cool spot in the stnte yesterday, the Weather bureau reporting a high of 09 yes- terday and a 7 a. m. reading today of a cool 57. Two Rivers, on Lake Michigan, enjoyed an off-lake breeze which held the temperature to a maximum of 76 yesterday. Milwaukee, which The flrst of the three parking lots will be located just north of tlie small pavilion, the second will be half way to the dike and the third will be near the levee. About feet will separate each of the park- ing .areas, and_ 'these intervening spaces would be suitable for play- grounds. Each of the parking lots would be 150 feet wide, sufficient to accommodate four rows of cars parked at right angles. One would be 590 feet long, another 510 feet and the third 290. Egypt Appeals to U.N. for British Troop Withdrawal pealed to the United Nations se curlty council today to free her from "the orbit of British imperial power" by ordering the immediate withdrawal of all British troops from Egyptian soil. The appeal was made personally by Egyptian Premier Nokrashy Pasha as. .the council began con- sideration of Egypt's complaint that continued presence of British forces in Egypt was a "potential peril" to peace in the Middle East. "We are Nokrashy Pnslm declared, "to challenge the basic assumptions of 19th century Im- perialism." In his speech, the Egyptian premier informed the council that his government no Mrs. Thuransky into the car behind her husband nnd drove away. Later the official said the three Hungarian policemen "just stood there and stared" when he made olf with their prisoner.. The Hungarian ministry of the in- terior issued a press statement say- ng that was na- turalized in 1930 and said he re- jrescntcd the International Harves- ter Company in being taken to the national defense de- partment "for a hearing" when "two unknown men and one woman grabbed him and shoved him into port of its evidence are in, city at- torneys for Minneapolis, St. Paullionger considered Itself bound by and Duluth, opposing the Increase, the Anglo-Egyptian treaty of 1936, will be given ten days to flic re- under which British farces are sta- buttal briefs. N. J. Holmberg, railroad and warehouse commission chairman who presided over hearings here and in St. Paul, said he and his fellow commissioners Frank W. Matson and Ray P. Chase would then tato the case under advise- ment. tioned in this strategic Mediterran- ean country. The council late yesterday re- jected by a vote of nine to two a Soviet resolution proposing to or- der all foreign troops out of Greece and to create an ll-natlon com- mission to supervise foreign eco- nomic aid to Greece. Elected Legion Boys Forum Head a waiting vehicle bearing American license plates." Arrested Friday The ministry's statement was is' sued shortly after U. S. Minister Selden Chapln had protested to acting Foreign Minister Erno Ml- halyfl about Thuransky's arrest. 'The foreign- minister's answer was said at the American legation to have been unsatisfactory. Thuransky was arrested Friday night at Balassagyarmat on charges of making "undemocratic utter- remarks about :he Communist party and its leader, Deputy Premier Matyas Rakosi. On his arrival in American cus- tody Thuransky said he had been >caten by the Hungarian police and threatened with shootins. Farmer Held In Indiana Triple Slaying State to Add to Fund for The city of Wlnona today has available an "outside" fund of lor putting its new air- port in operating shape. The federal Civil Aeronautics administration Monday night announced a grant of to Winona, supplementing a. 000 griant made by the Minnesota, legislative advisory early in June, This fund, according to present plans, will be employed in a de- velopment estimated to cost about In addition to the work now under contract. Included la that plan is placing an asphalt mat on the northwest- southeast runway; stabilizing the other two runways, the north-south runway and the foot northeast-southwest runway; paving of the runway apron; light- ing of the longer runway; disposal equipment; securing or a water supply and pumphouse; fenc- ing; parking lot and miscellaneous electrical work. City Engineer Carl W. Frank. In- formed of the CAA allocation of commented, "We were In- formed last May that the CAA would probably raise to ts temporary grant made early this year. However, we as yet not even made official appli- cation for the grant KS required by the CAA, and this grant is some- what of a surprise. However, CAA has unofficially already ap- provcd the plans." To Approval He said that the plans were to go to CAA this week for official approval, and that advertising for bids on the work would undoubtedly await the official approval by CAA and the Minnesota department of aeronautics. The grant made by state curly this year earlier state grants, cf being expended under a with the Walter W. Magee Com- pany, St. Paul, engaged In trading and draining the site, lo- (Contlnued on Pace 12, Column 3) AIRPORT Weather Paraguayan Rebels in Capital, Brazil Paper Says Buenos newspaper Noticias Graficas said in dispatch last night from the Paraguayan border that rebel troops had enter- ed Paraguay's capital city of Asun- cion and were fighting government forces in the streets. (In earlier reports from Rio de Janeiro, the rebel radio said thatj insurgents had captured a number of Important ports in their advance down the Paraguay river to Asun- cion.) Frank Russell, .U. S. demands from many communities'has grown smug In lake shore cool-' Air Leader, Dead for more main trunk routes and ness for years, was smote wlthi the continued maintenance of old routes. Although Ihu highway .system stole, since the was .started in 1021, has spent on con- struction and J154.000.000 on main- tenance, Hoffmann thurc arc Milwaukee Linda Toonan. itlll morn thim 700 miles of ob- onr-yrar-old diiughtcr of Mr, unt John Toornin. Wmiwjitosii, Injured fatally yesterday when run over by u cm', which ap- parently was started while she was playing undernenth it. Doves Fly at Hiroihima In A-Bomb Obtervance Iflrojhlma. Japnti Doves heeled and fluttered over the of the world's first atom- bombed city todny. us .survivors be- Riin 11 thrce-diiy .second observance, Shi.vso Ilrnrml led a prayer that peoples In the world Join In iT.'iunclntlon of war us symbolic dows vrre released. The ntotnlc bomb wax dcton- fctca here August C, IMS. solute 18-foot pavement in the lay- out, The committee named Representa- tives Roy E. Dunn, Pollcan Rapids, Miller, Houklns, as a subcommittee to recommend a part time research director and set August 14 for its next meeting U. N. Gets Assets of League of Nations of Na- tions assets amounting to Swiss francs (about have been transfer- red, for the moat pnrt to tho United Nations nnd the Inter- national Jubor office, It was unnouuccd today. 4 the sweltering high Green Bay suffered an unkind vagary also. The temperature climbed to 91 In' the afternoon, then n shift of wind dropped the reading to 81, Just as everyone leaned back to enjoy twilight, the wind shifted again nnd the temperature smoked up to 98. Other hot spots Included Wau- suu 98, and La Crosse 96. Yesterday's official high in Wls- i l> U14JI J 111M11 ill VYIO and Novak with Senator Archie COnsin, 104 at Eau Claire, was with- in two degrees of the top August reading in the state since 18D4, when It was 106 at Prairie du Chlcn, Mrs. Bessie Eastman, Political, Social Figure, Dies at 73 Philadelphia 
                            

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