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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: July 30, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 30, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER fooler rhl and 111 DAYS tfol Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations VOLUME 47, NO. 138 WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 30, 194 7 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGjff F.D.R. Pushed Hughes Contract, Claim Attlee to Cut Occupation Army, Report Party Backing Given Prime Minister in Economy Drive My Arthur Ouvjihon London A Socialist source nftlfl Prime Minister Attlcc told La- bor legislators today that Britnin clash her milltiiry commit- ments In Germany, Italy uncl Greece nlmo.it immediately bccnusc of the nation's looming economic crisis. Attlee won a vlrtutil votn of con- fidence from Labor member of par- liament after explaining to them the "broad lines" of his plan tor meet- ing the crisis. The Socialist source, who is con- nected closely with Labor members of parliament, wild Attlee promised quick and complete troops with- drawals from the Vcnczln Glulla .sector of northeast Italy and from Greece and substantial reduction.-, In the British occupation forces In Germany. Demanded Left wing Labor pnrty members have been demanding reductions In the armed forces, which totaled men July 1. A well-informed source said Attlee also had decided to iisk miners, now on a five-day week In the re- cently socialize con) pits, to work tn extra hour a day to Increase production of critically needed coal, the mainstay of the British economic structure. About After Attlee told the labor M.P.'s of plans for troop reductions, the noclalist source said there were cries of "What about The Informant said Attlee did not reply. It is estimated British sol- In that mandate. Hanging of 2 In Palestine Reported Officials Unable to Find Bodies After Reprisal Execution By Edward Curtis The Irgun Zval Leuml, Jewish underground agency, asserted today It had hanged two kidnaped British sergeants in re- Iprlsal for the execution of three of ,its members. An extensive search by Welsh guards. Palestine police and a group of reporters for two hours along the coastal plains disclosed no trade Truman Reduced Army Appropriation Bill army's appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1948 was signed today by President Tru- man. It Is below the President's budget estimates. Truman alao signed a 000 appropriation bill to finance a score of miscellaneous gov- ernment corporations during the current fiscal year. of the bodies. Police, the military and Jewish sources said had no clue as to the whereabouts of the sergeants. An Irgun "communique" had asserted that the bodies would be found within two and a half miles of Na- tanya, where the kidnaped July 12. Shortly after the hostages were "communique" Eat Through the explosion-torn root of the P. W. Berk Chemical Corporation and throw a spectacular pillar of smoke against the sky In Wood-Ridge, N. J. Three blasts and the flre left only the walls of tho factory standing. The flre was brought under control early today, firemen announced. L, A. Hahn, building superintend- ent, said the flre was caused by spontaneous combustion and spread rapidly. (A.P. Wlrephoto.) Forces In Germany were estimat- ed by A weU-lnformrd source yes- terday at between 200.000 nnd 000. The British disclosed recently they would ask the United States to 20 par cunt of the cost of feeding nnd administering tho eco- nomically merged American and British occupation zones, A bulletin iMUtt) iiftrr the meet- Ing wild tho members had "complete satisfaction of the party" with the prime minister's Attire faced the IrglMntorn, many of whom had bct-n critical of his leadership, at a strictly private cau- cus. St. Paul Mayor Will Not Run St. John J, Mc- Donough of St. I'uul announced last night that, because of ill health, hr would .not be a candidate for re- flrctlon next year. MeDonough hiw held l.hc office xlnro In Junuury. while in Washington, he suffered iitrokc ivnd hiw not complete health since, he suld. Ten Women Killed in Blast At Beauty Shop in Virginia By James J. Geary Harrisonburg, Va. A terrific explosion originating in a one-story combination beauty shop and school snuffed out the lives of ten women here yesterday, injured at least 30 other per- sons, shattered glass in a number of business establishments and homes and kept rescue workers toil- was issued from Toil Aviv, a police source there reported that the bodies of the two soldiers had been found. Official government sources, how- ever, were not immediately able to confirm that the Martin and Nervin been slain. Trial' The underground Jewish organi- zation asserted the Britons, seized at Natanya, were tried by a "mili- tary court" and convicted on charges of "illegal entry into Palestine, be- ing members of an illegal British Firemen Fight Fire At Fond du Lac Fond du Lac, Wis. gutted the Hills Brothers Depart- ment store and the Ames shop in the heart of Fond du Xac today and Flre Chief Harry L. Glaser said the which continue to rage, had done damage. With emergency units from Osh kosh, Neenah and Appleton calle In to help, firemen wearing respir ators against heavy black fought desperately to blaze before It spread drug -store and photo studio wen In its immediate path. Flames already had broken through the roof of the Hill store one of the city's largest depart- ment stores, embers into Hot Enough for You? Jesse Jones Cooler Weather Ahead Testifies in After Sweltering Night Senate Probe terrorist organization the British occupation Mrs. Ingalls Ordered to Pay Negro Maid Sun Dlcgo, federal Judge's mercy spared Mrs. Alfred Wesley Ingalls going to prison to- day but the 02-year-old club-woman must pay to her former Negro maid, Dora Jones, for nearly 40 enslavement. Ing far into the night. The weary rescue men. using power machinery and working in dust' and'smoke, coased.their, search of the debris at 11 p. m. last night but planned to resume today in. an effort to ascertain if more bodies might be hidden in the ruins of the beauty shop and a Jewelry store which adjoined it on one side. Nine Killed Instantly Nine of the women apparently were killed Instantly while Miss Dorothy Gall Bowman, of Mount Jackson, getting a permanent wave tin a 20th birthday present, from jhcr parents, died of injuries shortly criminal known as force In Palestine, which is respon- sible for the suppression of Jewish rights in Palestine and for the de- portation of Jewish citizens from their home land." Hagana, another Jewish under- ground agency of less violent lean- ings, was reported to have con- ducted an all night search for the sergeants despite the British cur- few. The Irgunists hanged by the Brit- ish were Meir Naknr, Absolom Hablb and Yacoub Weiss. They had been .condemned-for the shooting, bombing jail delivery at Acre prison May 4 in which 251 convicts were set Sobbing, Mm. Ingalls at Rocklngham Memorial with bowed head yesterday n.s Judge Hospital. All were nearby residents. Jacob Weinberger suspended a! The blast was felt as" far away thrcc-ycnr prison sentence, "Tho defendant Is no hardcnc he said. Jan four miles. Stained glass win- dows In a nearby Methodist church Weather FKDKKAL FOKKCASTS For Winona and vicinity: Fair tonight and Thursday. Cooler. Low tonight 62: high Thursday 84. Minnesota tonight and Thursday. Cooler tonight and in southeast portion Thursday. Wisconsin Fulr and cooler tc- nlghc and LOCAL WKATHKU Official observations for t.he 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, fi2: minimum, 78; noon. 80: precipitation, none; sun.they had accidentally" started "the srls tonight (it sun rises to-if ire which did damage to morrow at TKMI'KKATUKKS KLSKWIIKHF. Together with tho cash retribution for Dora Jones, the court dictate other terms as the price of freedom Tor the defendant who was convict pd of forcing her maid into slavery because of nn affair nearly 40 year UKO with Mrs. Ingalls' first husband Walter Harman of Washington D. C, She was flnod placed un- der "rt'hubllltatlon" treatment of a phy.slclan-p.sychlatrlst; and ordercc to avoid any act of retaliation against witnesses In her four-week trial. The court was advised that the settlement was acceptable to tho 58-year-old Dora Jones, now liv- ing with a brother In St. Louis, Mo CO 77 (ill H'J 111 (III 70 711 14 la Miix. Mln. Pet. BcmldJI lir> Chicago fl-I 7L' Denver !M Mfilnc.r IIKI Duluth (12 Kun.'m.', Clly Id.'i Miumi MinnrnjMili.i-st. I'mil New F'hrx-nlx Kin Sent tic 77 .15 ICIVKIl UlILLKTIM Flood .Singe 24-I-Ir StiiKi! Totluy Changf Tlr-d WinK Ljtkc City Diim 4, T.W Dum 5. T.W Dam 5A, T.W Wlnona Dam C. Pool Dum C. T.W Dakota Dam 7. Pool 7, T.W Lit Crossc !'_' Tributary Chlppfwa nt Duranci 2.8 Zumbro at Theilman.. 1.0 ButTalo above Alma.... 5.0 Black at XelHsi-illc ____ 2.H La Crowe nt W. Suli-m l.D Koot nt Houston C.I KIVKIt KOUKCAST Ila-sliiiffs, to Guttenhcnc) Further gute adjustments were ntcessiiry to maintain lower pool levels but ar. normal pool elevations have now been reached there will be Hi tic change In the stitgcs above t.hp various ilum.s nnd only slight further falls (it tullwnter gauges. All tributaries will fall slowly. 5 Boys Admit Starting St. Paul Fire St. Tnul Five boys, rang- ing In age from four to eight years admitted to firemen last.night that a food store and two apartments ubovu It, nt 750 Capitol Heights while they were playing with mutchc.H Tuesday. King of Give Formal Consent to Marriage George VI l.t to give formal public consent to the irrlnKc of Princess Elizabeth to Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten at a privy council meeting tomorrow under procedure required by the 175-year-old royal marriages act. were blown out as were those in several homes and business estab- lishments: Chief of Police Julius F, Ritchie said he looked out of his window and saw heavy black smoke all over the business arcn of this Shcnandoah valley town of persons. Cau.se Unknown The cause of the explosion was undetermined. An early theory, that a boiler had exploded PWOS dis- counted last night. Coal was being unloaded Into the basement at the time of the explosion, 2 p. m. yester- day, and rescue workers said they distinctly smelled gas in .the debris. Nineteen of the 30 persons injured remained in the hospital for treat- ment. One was termed critically hurt while the injuries of six others were considered serious. Six of the 19 were men, three of these Negroes. One witness said the beauty shop cnown as Pauline's Beauty college 'looked like a bomb hit it." Serious damage was also done to Rhodes Jewelry store, next door, and silver and Jewelry were s'cattered into the street. The wall of a building on the other side of the jewelry store, which was being renovated, was also damaged by the terrific force of the blast. free and 16 persons were killed. Acre Head Suspended It was confirmed officially that G. E: G. Charlton, superintendent of Acre prison, had buun suspended for refusing "for personal reasons" to attend the executions of the three Irgunists. Charlton, 25 years in Palestine government jobs, was suc- ceeded by Andrew Clowe, who super- vised the hangings. An inquiry was In progress. The dusk-to-dawn qurfew imposed about two weeks ago on the Jews In Haifa was lifted today. A British constable, wounded by underground gunfire in Haifa July 19, died 'during the night. and sent showers 01 the nlr. Two block, of streets were barricaded, bu hundreds of spectators gathered in the area. Fire Chief Leo L. Girent of Oshkosh also dispatched a 1.000 gallon truck to aid in soaking near- by buildings. The north wall of Hills, on Forest avenue, showed signs of weakening during the height of the conflagra- tion. Firemen, who had just returned to stations after a minor blaze when the big alarm broke at dawn, reached the mezzanine level of Hills through a smashed window and rescued the store's documents. Businessmen hurried to their of- fices in the Haber building, just behind Hills, to while the flames threat to that structure. remove papers posed an early Texan Killed in Freak 3itchfork Accident Bollovuc, Texan 3. Walter Graham, 57-yeur-old farmer, was killed in a freak accident near here yesterday. His pitchfork was caught n a drive belt conveyor, causing me of the prongs to pierce his heart. Loss in Merrill, Wis., School Fire Merrill, 45-yenr-olti section of the Merrill Hfgh school was destroyed in a flre early today. Flre Chief Walter N. Johnson and school olllcials estimated the damages, adding that heat, smoke and water damage to the new sec- tion of the building probably would run into thousands of dollars. The flre was discovered by a passerby .at n. m. The school's library and workshop were de- stroyed. Johnson said the wide corridor leading to the new structure burn- ed, igniting soundproofing and woodwork The fire charring building, discovered about fallen plaster in the new school. in the new chief said he of of three inches the hallway Dutch Regret rv Downing of Medical Plane Uatavla, Juvn The Dutch army said today it Would be a cause of "great regret" to the Nether- lands government should it develop that a plane reported downed by Dutch fighters near Jogjakarta was Indeed an unarmed transport car- rying medical supplies from India Shooting down of the plane as it came in for a landing was announc- ed yesterday by the Indonesian gov- ernment radio nt Jogjnknrta, which said nine persons were killed Jn the crash. Commenting upon the Indonesian broadcast, an official statement from Netherlands nrmy headquar- ters said that two Dutch fighter pilots yesterday had reported In- tercepting a plane which they be- lieved to be a former Japanese "Bet- ty Bomber" and seeing the plane crash near Jogjakarta after warn- Ing bursts from their guns. The statement declared, however, that the Identity of the plane was 'not clearly The Dutch said they had no ad- vance notice that any plane bearing medical supplies was en route to Jogjakarta. (At Singapore, two American im- port-export traders said today that worth of sulfa drugs, bandages and cotton donated by them Was, aboard an Indian-owned Dakota! transport plane which the Indone- Sought Combine, Martin Tells Jonca .Ifled todny that the Inte President Roosevelt ordered that work con- Inue on a flying bout irdercd during the war from How- ard Hughes. Jones, former secretary of com- nercc, said he talked with. Mr. Roosevelt following a cabinet meet- ng in February, 1944, and that the xccutlvc said he did not believv money already spent on the project hould be thrown away. At that time, the government had pent approximately on IB 200-ton flying boat which ot yet been flown. Some govern- ment production officials wanted to rop the project. Jones told his version of the story i a Senate war investigating ommlttee inquiring Into the award Cool As A you've wondered about that expression, take a good look at this cute cuke grown by R. K. Hoy of CJoodviejv and brought to The Republican-Herald's Ain't Nature Wonderful editor. When the mercury Jet-propelled itself to 92 yesterday and the hot sun was beating down on a perspiring populace, Mr. Hoy found this coy number. The cucumber had grown itself special umbrella-like leaf to shield oil the hot sun and beat the heat. If you believe an old Polish saying, "From St. Anne's day we expect cool you can continue to take heart. St. Anne's day was July 26 when temperatures boiled up to a summer high of 95 here. But you probably won't be- lieve any adage after sweltering all last night. Tuesday night was the hottest this season with thermometers refusing to budge below 78 after a humid high of 02 degrees during the day. Warmest night for sleeping previously was 73 on July 3. The thundcrsbowers forecast for last night didn't materialize, and the hoped-for cooling at 11 p. m. turned- cut- to be hot blasts. However, things were looking better today, unless you're an ice salesman. At noon the tem- perature was 80, ten precious de- grees below the noon reading yesterday. Furthermore, the weatherman's forecast says cool- er tonight In Minnesota nnd Thursday In the southeast por- tion. Wisconsin can expect fair and cooler also. The St. Charles urea a heavy rain this morning but only iv few drops fell in Winona. The entire Upper Mississippi valley and the central plains sweltered under some high tem- peratures. The temperatures in 10 states was above 100 degrees yesterday. The hot spot wns Yuma, Ariz., topping the list with a 110. Corn In Iowa was growing like mad, DCS Molnes reporting 100-depree weather. Phoenix Jind 109 for runner-up honors to Yunin, while Kansas City was a torrid 105. Peter Wiiichnliittis. 42, of North Mankato, collapsed anil died at his home last night. the first Mankato fatality In the current heat w.ive. Clcnn Martin, Baltimore Aircraft manufacturer, testifies today at Washington, D. C., be- fore a Senate war investigating subcommittee. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republican-Herald.) slan republic reported shot down by the Dutch yesterday at Jogjakarta.) (At Jogjakarta, the Indonesian republic gave a military funeral to- Chicagoan Vegetarians' Candidate New York White-bearded Dr. John Maxwell of Chicago, who says he hasn't "tasted meat, fish or fowl in 45 is the presi- dential candidate of the American Vegetarian party. Vegetarians from over the na- I tlon organized the party and named the 84-year-old Chlcagodn last night at a hotel dinner from which meat was missing. day to nine British, four Indonesians and one Indian killed in the plane crash.) Meanwhile, the Netherlands forces, engaged since July 20 Veterans, One an Amputee, Win in Michigan Primary Saultc Sic. Marie, 'wo former servicemen, one a leg- ess veteran with little political cx- lerlcnce, squared off today in the ght for Michigan's vacant scat in ic United States Congress. Thirty-slx-ycar-old Charles Pot- er of Sheboygan, political unknown lost his legs In Normandy, and Jarold D. Beaton, 41, of St. Ignace, ormer Mackinac county prosecutor nd Pacific veteran, won in yester- rvy's special llth district primary. The Republican nomination went to Potter in a decisive four-three ledge over Victor A. Knox, speaker jot the house In Michigan's legisla- jture. Beaton defeated Mrs. Violet Patterson of Perkins for the Dcmo- St. Paul Governor Young- jcratic nomination by a near two- dahl's office announced today margin. chief executive will speak at seven I, Voters of the district will choose Youngdahl to Speak at Fair to Bible Washington W) Senator Brewtler (R.-Me.) cited mlah's biblical account of bow Sanballat "thought to do mtachief" today ax rrply to Howard Hughei' contention that a Senate Invalidation of bin war contracts in an effort to force mercer of two BrewEter told "I simply refer anyone OTtod to chapter six In the book of Nehemlah." BrewKtcr cited DO veraes. An edition publfcbed by the Amer- ican bible aociety the chapter ID theae "SanbalUt practiwth by craft, by rumorx, by hired propheetei. to terrify NehemUh. The work is flnlihed. to the terror of the enemlcK." county fairs and the Minnesotajbetwtcn the two in an election state fair. Included is the Wlnona to flu the vacancy left in county fair, St. Charles, August 17. ition by the recent death of Bepre- Eleva Phone Company Authorized Rate Hike Madison, IVis. The slate against the Indonesian republic, to- public service commission announc- 'scntative Fred A. Bradley, Rogers craft. ot about worth of war- ime plane contracts to Hughes and Henry J. Kaiser. Jones said he had signed original contract on. direct Instruc- lons from the war prodncttaa and without knowing project was opposed by the and navy. Combine Propoied He took the stand after Olenn L, :arttn, Baltimore plane builder, had testified that Kaiser ap- proached him in July. 1942. wltb iroposal to form a omblnc to build 500 large ilancs on a government order Caiscr said he alone could (tet. Kaiser acknowledged. Martin .tald. hat the proposal was "at vnrlAnce" with the approved army-navy pUnn roduction program, taut ould get it okayed by appealing o "high places." It was some time later, Martin .Id, that Kaiser obtained a ROV- rnment contract Jointly with How- rd Hughes to build three 400-ton argo planes. As the hearings wore resumed, ith Martin in. the witness chair, lughcs, Hollywood film producer nd airplane designer. Issued latcnient in California awertlnv iat the investigation is an attempt o "coerce" him into agreeing to a icrgcr of Trans World Airlines witfc uan Trlppc's, Pan American Air- ays. Hughes' has an extensive in- terest in TWA. Brewsler Offer Hughes declared that Senator Brewster chairman of the Senate group, once offered to "call off" the investigation it Hughes would agree to the merger. Martin, whose engineers designed the 140-ton- Mars flying boat, laid that five years ago yesterday Kai- ser came to his Baltimore plant and said he was interested in forming a company to build 500 of these City Republican. Two Claim Money day reported a new amph'lbloux op-jcd today it had granted n. rate SftUK CdltfC cratlon aimed near the northern endjcrease to the EJeva Farmers' Tele-! of Sumatra, big island northwest ofjphonc Company. Java. 'county. Accepting the nomination he and his adherents invited anti-vivisec- tlonists, anti-nicotinists, prohibi- tionists and "all people of similar high moral principles" to join their campaign. THIS NIW CRAFT, shown in an architect's sketch, has been proposed for use by the Coast Guard for rescue work in high sens. It is a helicopter- glider that can be launched almost vertically from land nnd water. It has two thrcc-bladed rotors, each revolving in the opposite direction, which would overcome serious balance problems. The amphibious craft, which would be towed behind plane and released-at tho scene of a disaster. Is designed to carry a crew of three nnd n good number ol the survivors of a shipwreck. Coast Guard photo. Man Drowns in Lake Near Fergus Falls Fergus Falls John Hild. 37, drowned Tuesday when he jump- ed from a rubber raft and failed to come back to the surf ace. at nearby Star lake. The body was recovered Australia to Ask U.N. Intervention in Java Canberra Prime Minister J. B. Chiefley annouced today that Australia had directed her repre- sentative in the United Nation's se- Hibbing Calls for Bids on Paving Program Ribbing The village coun- cil Tuesday called for bids on a palvng program, the im- provements to be financed from the postwar fund, according to Becorder J. J. Taveggia. v India Asks Action Lake Success India de- manded formally today that the United Nations security council act to settle the fighting be- tween Dutch and Indonesian forces. The Indian complaint was handed to Dr. Oscar Lange of Poland, president of the coun- cil, and Adrian Pelt, acting sec- retary -Keneral' of the U.N. by Sen, Indian representative. existence of any threat to the peace. breach of peace or act of aggres- St. Paul Elmer Stovern Minnesota crime bureau chief, re- vealed last night that two persons have made claims for the that figured in the Sauk Centre bribe disc, recently dismissed by Judge Rol E, Barron at St. Cloud. Mayor Walter Ottcson of Sauk Centre claimed he had been paid the money as a bribe to get him to halt a campaign for a municipal curity council to draw the council's sion, and shall make recommenda- tions or decide what measures shall j. be taken to maintain or restore international peace and security." Chiefley expressed hope that the council would act swiftly to bring an end to hostilities between the Netherlands and the Indonesian re- public. (In New Delhi, the interim gov- ernment of India today appealed to the council to intervene in the Dutch-Indonesian fighting and bring it to an end as a menace to the peace of the world.) "This Is the first time in the his- tory of the council that this arti- cle (39) has been the Aus- tralian prime minister said, "and it is the hope of the government In attention to the Indonesian situa-1 taking this action that not only will tlon under article 39 of the U.N.'hostilities cease but that the secur- charter. ity council will prove its worth in Article 39 provides that the se- dealing quickly .and effectively with curity council "shall determine the la situation ol this kind." liquor store. Stovern, whose agents :harge of the money as evi- said Otteson now seeks Its return on the grounds that it was merely loaned pending determina- tion of the court case. Accused by Otteson in the since dismissed action were Peter Do- ran and Jesse Rose. Attorneys for Rose, Stovern declared, have writ- ten him asking return of the because it was allegedly obtained from Rose "through fraud and mis- representation." St. Paulite Named to Pan-American Board Washington Secretary of State George Marshall Tuesday an- nounced the appointment of Wil- liam Dawson of St. Paul, former ambassador to Uruguay, as TJ. S. special z'cpresentativc, with the rank of ambassador, on the Pan Ameri- can union's governing board. Kaiser, a ship builder, with no previous experience in the aircraft fleld. suggested that flvc of the largest companies, including Mar- tin's, combine to furnish nnd capital for a venture he would direct, the witness said. "He said there would be a good profit in Martin commented, adding that his company at that time was interested primarily in fulfilling contracts for the army and navy for other type ships and sought only a "reasonable profit." Senator Ferguson pre- siding over current hearings as sub- committee chairman, said Jesse H. Jones, former secretary of com- merce and head of wartime govern- ment loan agencies, will be asked to tell what he knows about tha contract Hughes for a 200-ton flying boat. Leahy Involved The committee already has heard from Kaiser that Admiral William D. Leahy, presidential chief of staff and the late President Roosevelt's adviser on military matters, had a hand in the negotiations. Kaiser and his aide. Chad P. Cal- loun, testified yesterday that they went to the White House at suggestion of Donald Nelson, then, war production board chief. There they conferred with Leahy who -sras 'very much for the Calhoun said. He added that a letter promising Jie contract for three flying boats was written six days later. This ettcr was amended to call for only one flying boat. Ferguson said Hughes may testify tomorrow.   

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