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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: July 24, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 24, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                EATHER Fmrlly rloudy nil mtlghtly tunlihl ind frliUr. Full Leaied Wire Newt Report of The Associated Press 105 DAYS Sinn Pool All Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47, NO. 133 WINONA, MINNESOTA. THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 24. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY About 175 Trained, Barer Rural Wlnona county youths were competing at the Masonic temple here today for the 30-odd spots at the Wlnona county fair and the ultimate, goal ot 12 trips to the Statft fair. The youngsters, representing 4-H units throughout the county, converged on Wlnona early this morning for the annual county 4-H Achievement day arid participated In demonstrations throughout the day. In the picture at the left Mrs. J. B. Enstad, 411 West Sanborn street, judge of the food and clothing exhibits, numbering about 150, another phase of Achievement day, examines muffins with Miss Adeline Rlchter Wlnona county 4-H club agent. One ot the early group of bread demonstrators were the youngsters at the right: Lois Qroth'; Houston, Pleasant Busy Bees- Republican-Beratd photos Betty Lou Theslng, Lewiston, Lewiston Rural Ramblers; Diane Habeck and Donna Habeck, Wilson Fireflies; Mary Alyce Wirt, Lewlston, Warren Warblers, and Mary Morcomb, Houston, Pleasant Busy Bees. Demonstrating seams and seam finishes (center picture) is Lucille Kryzer, Rushford, Happy Hart club. The 175-odd youngsters were performing on five platforms, each of which had its own judge and platform manager. Each, of them late this afternoon would receive either a blue, red or white ribbon and either 75 cents or 50 cents as a prize, do- nated by the agricultural committee of the Winona Association of Commerce. In addition about 30 would be selected for the- county fair competition. Congress Set to Adjourn on Saturday yoted by Senate for Commercial Harbor in Winona for Area Projects in Bill More than worth of river and harbor Improvements for the Upper UioiMippi river in the Wi- were, added by the .united Senate to the' and har- bors bill approved today and sent to a Senate-House conference com- mittee, according to on Associated Preia dispatch from Washington. improvements, previously eliminated by the House but restor- ed by the Senate, include an ap- propriation of for the de- velopment of a commercial and nnallboat harbor in Wlnona. Thlt project, pending in Congress for a number of yearn, Is the gov- ernment's share of the development of the commercial harbor located on the river east of the Mississippi Valley Public Service Company plant. The city council recently re- quested the renewal of this project from the War department. Some dredging baa already been done there by the government. Other area projects Included In the Senate bill are an appropriation of for the expansion of the Lake City sroallboat harbor, for the development ot a smallboat harbor at Wabasha, and for further work of the smallboat har- bor at Red Wing. No mention was made in the dispatch of money be- ing made available for a smallboat harbor at Alma. WIs. However, engineers are Inclined to be- lieve that this project Is also in- cluded. The Dispatch The detailed dispatch from Wash- ington follows: Russian Veto May Force Action In Balkan Crisis Outside U. N. By John A, Jr. Lake Snooem' -Certain United Nations expressed belief today that the future of the world organisation might hinge on between the United States Russia over tho Balkans. and Authoritative sources said that If Russia vetos a tr. S. proposal to set up an international watch'over the Balkan orders Britain, -the United States and other countries might feel forced to. take action suddenly removed diplomatic wraps outside The 'security council scheduled two meetings today 'on' the Balkan problem, but It .appeared that a the outcome of the showdown fight vote on tho U. 8. plan would not be Cached before next week. The seriousness of the situation, with'Its ultimate effect on the fu- ture, of the world organization, was reflected in yesterday's council ses- sion. At that time, the United States Yugoslavia, Albania and Bulgaria were a menace to international peace.: In some of the bluntest language ever used in a council session, Her- schel V. Johnson, U. S. deputy dele- gate, .demanded that the council warn the three Soviet satellites "to keep order in their own houses and leave other peoples' affairs alone." Russia Balks At Far East Peace Efforts Other May Go Ahead Despite Soviet Reactions By -John M. Hlfhtower WafUnrioa r new Grain-Buying For World Relief Planned Tru- man said today that a world trade organization to buy grain for dis- tribution under the Marshall Eur- opean recovery plarf is under con- sideration. The President made this state- ment at a news conference when questioned about Secretary of Ag- riculture Anderson's proposal for such an organization. Mr. Truman also said that he has no plans for domestic controls U. S. toTry New A tomic Bomb Tests By Elton C. Fay Washington A -world un over wheat und corn. A fund for civil functions of tho Wai department took a plnco on the Sen- ate's crowded schedule today. prcacljournmcnt Adding more than to House-approved bill, the blK money measure was oktiyecl by the appro- priations committed lust nltfht jn o hurried meeting to bent tho ad- journment deadline Saturday. Or the total fund, the commit- tee recommended for flood control, navigation, hydroelec- tric and related projects during tho fiscal year which began 23 days ago. Of this sum, S326.8C3.825 Is for flood control, for navigation construction and maintenance. By Increasing the Hood control appropriation by nearly over the House figure, the commit- tee met In part President Truman's request for an additional 000 to begin a ten-year program of controlling floods and utilizing the country's water resources. Flood Defense The bill carries for flood defense In the Lower Mis- sissippi river valley, an Increase of Committee members predicted the bill would be ready for the Presi- dent by Saturday, although some House members are expected to ob- ject strenuously to the increase. Engel who piloted the measure through the House, said the Senate commit- tee's action conflicted with the Re- publican economy program, But others recalled that the House passed the bill before this year's dis- astrous Hoods and prior to the Pres- ident's proposal to undertake the ten-year plan as quickly as possi- ble. The so-called first announced State Marshall. "Marshall by Secretary of is the United States' offer to help European na- tions get on their feet economically if they work out plans to do what they can on, their own. On the matter of domestic con- trols over grain, Mr. Truman said thoso mentioned in his recent eco- nomic message to Congress had to do with export and transportation controls which might bo necessary to get grains to port cities for shipment abroad. Negro Who Won Car to Get Check Ahoskle, N. c. Harvey Jones was "at home" to all callers today, but ns tho sun rose on his tiny farm this morning, he -was un- aware that fate held a made to his order. The check was earmarked for the 23-year-old Negro war veteran by tho Ahoskle Klwanls club In an ef- fort to make amends for Jones' failure to receive a automo- bile which ho won in the club's raffle recently. The automobile was denied him when club officials ruled Ineligible because Negroes were barred from of the draw- able to agree on International con- trol of atomic bombs was put on notice by the United States today that: 1. It Intendi to conduct more tests of atomic weapons In the Pacific. i 2. Top military In the field of nuclear finlon now head .a Joint army-navy agency devoted to of atomic weapons of all types." 3. "We mean to maintain and Increase the pre-eminence of the United States in atomic weapons until acceptable Inter- national agreements" are reach- ed and control machinery es- tablished. A report of the Atomic Energy commission to Congress contained the terse announcement of further experiments and the implied ac- ceptance of. any challenge to a world atomic armament race. There was immediate speculation: That the test' of a third atomic bomb against one exploded two or three thousanc feet under be forth- coming. Questions Unanswered That atom bombardiers want to know, by experiment, what the Order Restored After Riots Kill 5 in Costa Rica San Joke, Costa Na- tional police, reinforced by spe- cial deputies, today to have restored order in San Joae and other Costa Rlcan cities following a series of bitter political clashes and .treet fights in which at least five persons were killed and 58 wounded. Business and transportation In his capital city, however, remained 'Irtually paralyzed by a general trike called by opposition leaders which closed all banks and commer- lal establishments. (Reports from neighboring Gua- emala asserted that a state of open evolt actually existed in Costa Rica, ut .informed sources in Panama xpressed doubt that there had been ny attempt at an organized rebel- on.) Strike Denounced The strike was denounced by the osta Kican cabinet as n "subver- ve movement" headed by Otlllo late, newspaper publisher and lead- between i the -United -States- -an this time over -drafting o a Japanese peace threatens today to destroy what little unit remains between the great powers Another prospect is that it ma delay indefinitely work on a pcac settlement lor Japan. Up to this' week 'there had been considerable hope here that Wash Ington- and Moscow would be abl to devise some means, for fashion Ing the Japanese treaty which would eliminate many of the fric tlons that have beset peace maklni In Europe. Russia's rejection yesterday of American proposals along this line greatly dimmed, If -it did not kil off, these hopes. Some officials, said the major question now facing the American and other governments interested (Continued on Pace 10, Column 3) RUSSIA Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity Partly and slightly warmer tonight and Friday. Low tonight 64; high Fri- day 87. Minnesota Partly cloudy to- night and Friday. Warmer Friday and in extreme north portion to- night. Wisconsin Partly cloudy, with slowly rising temperatures, tonight and Friday. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 82; minimum, 62; Mrs. Julia Katona, 35, above, shown with her husband. Navy Lieutenant Frank Katona, 37, and their two children, Barry-Frank, left, and Bonny-Joy, was found strangled to death and left on the floor of their log cabin at Toll Timbers, clad only. In shoes and socks. Medical Examiner F. F. Qreenwell said the body of Mrs. Katona was found by her husband about 12 hours after she died. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Dutch Drive on Capital Halted, Indonesians Say Government Denies Offensive Stopped; Claim Key Port Balavia Indonesian repub- cans declared today they hod turn- d back a strong Dutch threat gainst their capital of Jogjakarta nd stemmed a determined Dutcl drive on Malang, republican strong- hold in East Central Java. noon, 82; precipitation, none; sun The Indonesian news agency An- tara reported that on the cast-ccn- sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max, Min. Pet. r of the opposition party, who has would do to a simulated steel-and-concrete city Revisions and additions to the bill included: Flood control: North Garrison reservoir, ing. A Klwanls club group was sched- uled to depart this morning for Jones' backwoods home in this heavily wooded northeastern North Carolina community. There, the check was to be presented him in a surprise ceremony. Fritz Kuhn Jailed; Faces Munich Trial Munich, Germany (f) Fritz Kuhn, former leader of the Ger- man-American Bund, was in a Mu- nich jail tonight facing possible trial as a "Nazi offender" by a court of his German'neighbors. weapon modern and whether it would produce a localized but highly destructive artificial earthquake if exploded below, ground. That atomic scientists believe they have produced bombs vastly more powerful than those used up to can't be 'sure unless some actual explosion tests are conducted. Where is the proving ground to be located? The commission was tight-lipped on this, although It is presumed Congress has been given some private inkling because of the probable necessity for legislation and appropriations. Bikini, because It was the locale for the only previous off-shore tests, held immediate attention in speculation. The atoll, from which natives were removed prior to the 1847 experiments, is still uninhabit- ed save for. a visiting crew of sci- entists studying radiological and other effects of the two test bombs. charged tho government with re- strictive. measures In. the current presidential campaign, in which he is a candidate. The cabinet gave a vote of confi- dence to President Teodoro Plcado, who said he would' maintain order at any. cost. (It was reported in Balboa, Pan- ama canal zone, that the Costa Rlcan government had Imposed mar- Chicago .......V..... 79 Kansas City..........85 Los Angeles...........81 Miami 80 Mlnneapolls-St. Paul. 70 New Orleans......... 87 New York 78 Phoenix .............109 Seattle 77 Washington 76 63 63 01 78 62 67 62 70 56 57 ,1: Red Wing RIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-Hr Stage Today Changr 14 2.3 .3 However, there have been recent reports that residual radioactivity is still a man-menacing factor in Bikini lagoon and that some mild traces persist on the Islands them- selves of the contaminated "rain1 cloud. tlal law, and Pan American Airways Lake City .___'.. 6.5 In Balboa said last night- that- all I Reads 12 3.4 its flights.out.of San Jose had 4 TW.i 41 5 canceled.) The disturbances here began last Saturday'with-'a'street battle be- tween opposing political factions and; Dam 6. Pool 9.7 mounted in violence when'Dam 6, T. W. oppositionists stones'through windows and fought with police Dam 5, T. W. 2.1 Dam 5A, T. W. 3.7 Wlnona 13 5.5 squads called out to disperse them, Situation Under Control .Sporadic violence, accompanied by bursts of shooting, continued in San Jose and other places until late yes- terday, when police seemed to have brought the situation under control. Only a little more than a year ago San Jose .was a scene of a gun battle between federal police and an La Crosse at W. armed band which seized a radio Root at Houston station in an alleged plot to over- throw the government. One person was slain and two wounded. Presi- dent Plcado, who was elected in 1944 for'a four-year term, is the leader of the national Republican party and is supported by the Vanguardia popular party, which formerly was which fell from the radioactive Oosta Rica's communist organize- Jrom Lynxvllle to Dam No. 10. Little Hon. Dakota Dam 7, Pool Dam 7, T. W....... La 4.5 7.5 9.4 2.1 12 4.7 Tributary Streams Chippewa at Durand. .2.1 Zumbro at Thellman.. Buffalo above Alma.. 1.8 Trempealeau at Dodge. 0.5 Black at Nelllsville ____ 2.5 Black at Galesvllle ____ 2.2 ;m 1.6 6.2 .2 .1 '.i .1 .4 '.i .2 RIVER FORECAST (From to Guttenbcrg) There. will be little gate operation :he next 36 hours from St. Paul to Genoa so the river will not change much In this section, hav- ing attained normal levels. There will be a further fall of .3 to .5 foot, tral front republican troops occu- pied Modjokerto this afternoon The town is about 30 miles south- west of the once-powerful Dutch na- val base of Soenibnjii. The Dutch, denying their drive on Jogjakarta had been halted, an- nounced the capture of Cherlbon, Important northwest Java port and birthplace of the Independence agreement. Dutch Marines Dutch marines, the communique said, have sheared off a square-mile segment or East Java. Antnra said Indonesian forces had whipped behind a Dutch spearhead nit Salatlga, north of Jogjakarta, and forced the armor-supported Dutch to abandon the burning town and retire ten miles north to Toen- tang. Premier Amir Sjarlfoeddln told a news conference in Jogjakarta that Masslllon. Ohio Tests in ;he Indonesian scorched earth pediatrics nursery of City hos- Ashes of C. N. W. Inspector Scattered From Speeding 400 wisp of irray powder settling along the road- bed In the wake of a speeding: passenger train fulfilled yester- day a former railroad! nwn'.y de- sire to remain close to the life he had loved. When Cliarlcs M. Faujicl, re- tired Inspector .special ajrcntK for Hie Chicago North West- ern, illcd July H, he made a pact to "have his liixly cremated iintl the distributed alone the roiul'N rlclit-of-vay bctwcrn Chlcnco Milwaukee. His llfclanfr friend, ChnrlcK Scliircliffc, retired superintend- ent of the road's dlninjr car de- partment, carried out the pact as the. North Western's Capitol 400 streamliner sped alone at more than CO an hour. Tests Clear Boy of Killing Two Babies icy is going well in the Mnlang area Lieutenant General Slem B. Spoor commanding the Dutch campaign! said the Indonesians for the most part were in flight. He denied that ..he Indonesians had retaken Sala- Iga, insisting Dutch troops remain- ed in the town, which is astride a mountain highway loading to Jog- akarta. Few Prisoners change -In the tributaries. Spoor said that "the republican army la mostly running." He re- ported few prisoners taken, but safd tirge quantities of rifles, machine- guns, ammunition and-supplies had een captured. He said his forces occupied Che- Ibon, key republican port on Java's north coast 130 miles east of this Dutch capital, without serious clashes. pital apparently cleared six-year- old Roger Guc of Navarre today of the killing of two baby girls last June fi. Dr. Lcmoyne Snyder Lansing, Mich., medico-legal director of the Michigan state police said It was "most unlikely" the ad- mitted the killings last Monday then changed his story on Tues- ever did remove a baby from a crib." The Michigan criminoloRist ran a series of tests with the Guc boy re-enacting his purported "acci- his right arm in a cost as it was at the time of the babies' deaths. Eight week old Diane Jean Brand and ten-wcek-old Rosemary Morton were found dying with crushed skulls In. their cribs. Subject to Recall by Party Heads Final Action on Army-Navy Merger Awaited Washington tfP) Republican congressional leaden decided today to adjourn the first ceislon of the 80th Congress orx.Baturday. July 36V_ subject to possible recall lay Republi- can leaders. The decision was made at meeting of Senate and House ers in tho office of Bouse Speak- er Martin. Under the proposal agreed on. Congress con bo recalled during fall adjournment period by the speaker and the Republican leader of the House and the president pro- tern and majority leader ot the Sen- ate. Without that proviso In the ad- journment resolution, only Presi- dent Truman could recall Concreu Into special session once It ad- journed. Announcement of the decision made by Senator Tart of Ohio, chairman of the Senate Republican policy committee. Plan Wind-Up Unless recalled before then, lawmakers will reassemble on Janu- ary 6. Plans for tho remaining days or the session provide lor consider- ation primarily ot stalemated ap- propriation bills, the army-navy unification measure and some rela- tively unimportant legislation. But party leaders said privately there are no present plans to com- plete action on any of these mea- sures on the "controversial" Hat: The administration's request to permit war-displaced foreigners to enter the United States. The Wagner-Ellcnder-Taft lonf- range housing bill. A bill to provide federal assistance to states for education. The administration's request for legislation setting up a system of Inter-American military aid and arms standardization. An Increase in the minimum for Interstate workers from 40 to 60 cents an hour. Universal mllltnry training, which Mr. Truman has urgently tuked for and which a House armed subcommittee has recommended. The Senate-passed Bulwlnkle bill to permit railroads to agreements, subject only to Inter- state Commerce commission ap- proval, The Reed bill blueprinting method by which railroads BOW Ja bankruptcy may be restored to their original stockholders. The House-passed bill maldng It (Continued on Pare 5, Coiamn 6) CONGRESS Stassen Re-elected to Presidency of World Church Group Des E. Stas- sen, former governor of Minnesota, loday was re-elected president of the International Council of Re- igious Education. The election came as the council- sponsored World Sunday School convention moved into its second day "with a. discussion of the rela- tionship between the home and the church. Injuries Fatal to Minn., Farmer Cha- rest, 95, pioneer Ossco farmer, died in St. Andrew's hospital in Minne- apolis Wednesday of injuries suf- fered a week ago When, trampled, by a horse.   

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