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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 12, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER tonight) Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press 93 DAYS Wlnona Swfmtofnr Tool Act Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations OLUME 47, NO. 123 WINONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 12. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWELVE PAGES Two Shots Fired at Senator Bricker Bevin Heads Paris Conference Republican-Herald photo June lluchmunn, daughter of Mr. nnd Mrs, Louis Rueh- mann, 86-1 West Fifth street, who was chosen winner of the Junior Chamber of Commerce Queen of the Lake contest July 1, and will represent Wlnona at the Aquatcnnlal at Minneapolis next week, will leave next Thursday morning for that city. She Is pictured above at Lake park against a background of Wlnona hills in the bathing suit of lime green, a part of the wardrobe which she won-when she was named queen. Other Items in the wardrobe are a yellow taffeta formal, an aqua cotton frock, a white eyelet and blue cotton dress and a playsult in nqua. She Is five feet, flve Inches tall, brown-eyed, brawn-haired nnd 18 years old. She Is employed at the Bay Stato Milling Company office as a secretary. Senate Beats Down 8 Tax Bill Amendments Washington The Senate today rapidly swept aside eight attempts of Senator Morse to change the bill cnttlng income taxes and pushed on toward passage, probably in Greek Loyalists Gaining Ground On Guerrillas Br L. S, ChakalcH Alhrox Loyalist air artillery units were reported today by the Creek war ministry to be in JlictirjB heavy casualties and gain ing ground on guerrilla forces on Mount Grammes, where War Mln Jster George Strntos saicl the in sursents were- seeking to establish a communist state. Unconfirmed press dispatches salt an international brigade unit of 120 members had appeared In action on the guerrilla side in the Kozone region east o! Mount Grammos The communist press throughout Europe has been predicting the for- mation of such an outfit for some ume. Weather a few hours. In two overwhelming roll colls and six voice votes, the senators rejected the Morse amendments. Senator Wherry assistant majority leader, said the leadership will hold the Senate in session to- night If necessary to dispose of the bill. The G.O.P. leadership threatened to keep today's Senate session go- ing on Into the night If necessary to obtain passage of the tax cut bill. With approval of the measure conceded, main interest centered on tho size of the majority as a yardstick to show whether Presi- dent Truman's forthcoming second veto can be overridden. The no-quarter maneuvering by both sides to line up their forces "or that test went on grimly behind Pledges Full Resources Of Empire Survey on Needs, Resources First Task of Recovery By Tom William. Parlf Delegates of 16 na- lons began a 'conference today n European economic recovery with United States aid and were told Hat Britain and France' would give he Marshall plan firm backing. British Foreign Secretary -Ernest Bevln was elected president of the onfcrence and.immediately pledged n support of the plan the resources the whole British commonwealth f as we can In- uence it." Earlier, French Foreign Minister eorges Bldault In opening the ncctlng In the foreign ministry's grand dining hall said Britain and France would spare no effort to make the conference a success. Russia and eight other eastern nations were not represented. So- viet Foreign Minister V. M. Molo- tov had declined to join Bevin and Bldault in sponsoring the parley, and the other countries, following Russia's lead, had turned down In- vitations to the affair, The conference started with France seated at the head of the conference table. Bldault said the primary objective of the meeting would be to form an organization to determine Eur- ope's resources and needs as a pre- liminary to requesting United States financial assistance. Secretary of State George C. Marshall in a Harvard university speech June 5 offered TJ. B. support of a common Funeral Services for Repre- sentative J. J. Mansfield, Texas Democratic congressman who died in Washington today will be held In Columbus, Texas, with burial in Eagle Lake, Tex- as, Sam K, Seymour of Colum- bus, a friend of the family, re- ported, Mansfield, the oldest member of Congress, died at the Bethes- do, Md., Naval hospital. He was 86. Complications brought by age and various ailments caused him to be taken to the hospital 9. Truman to Ask Flood Control Plan for Midwest Tru- man will send to Congress next European reconstruction progrom. Bldault praised the .Initiative of the. TJ. 8. in offering financial aid for -the joint'-reconstruction pro- gram: In an early reference to the Bii- tlsh-Sovlet-Frehch conference of foreign ministers here two weeks ago, Bldault denied that economic cooperation constituted a threat to national sovereignty an objec- Six Convicts Killed Trying To Escape Seven Injured in Break From Georgia Prison Brunswick, and police shot five Negro con- victs to death and wounded eight the convicts' mass attempt to escape yesterday from a prison camp near this south- east Georgia coastal city. The shooting melee began, War-: den W. G. Worthy said, when one of the convicts attacked and sought to disarm him. He said the police j officers had been called to the camp earlier to aid prison guards in quel- ling a disturbance. Major C. A. Williams, head of the state department of prisons, sent !two Investigators from Atlanta to ;makc an inquiry Into the shooting Warden Worthy said the officers land guards opened fire with shot- jguns and rifles when a group of 27 Negro convicts raced toward a 12- foot fence enclosing their prison camp. The gunfire Jelled J3. Five were killed by the blast. Eight were wounded, two critically, one of whom died late Friday night in a Bruns- wick hospital. Fourteen convicts, their hands raised high, surrendered. The warden said none of the men was armed either with firearms or knives, .but that several carried short iron bars and sticks. The convict who "incited" the break for freedom was identified by Farmer Near Chat field Fractures Skull in Fall Chat field, -Minn. Bert Sorenson, about 05, who suffered a skull fracture In a haying accident Friday about p. was reported to be in poor condition at noon today at St. Mary's hospital in Rochester. Sorenson was thrown from the load of hay on his wagon when his team, ran away. He was working in the Held on Ills farm six miles east of ChatfJeld. Taken by ambulance to the hospital, he was placed In. an oxygen tent. Rising Seas x Halt Swimmer's Channel Crossing Belfast Rising seas forced Tom Blower, 33-year-old English lone distance swimmer, to abandon his attempt today to be the first man to swim from Donaghadcc, northern Ireland, to Tort Patrick, Scotland. Buffeted by breakers, he w.is pulled out of the north channel after nearly five hours in the chill water. He had covered about 11 miles and was battling the most difficult stretch of the 23-mile course.to Scotland. Blower, who swam the Eng- lish channel in 1937, said he would try again before his vaca- tions ends July 18 and he has to return to Ills Job in Notting- ham. School Aid Heads Wisconsin Agenda For Next Week By Arthur Bystrom Madison, WIs. Wisconsin's legislators decided yesterday, .after a long, hot week of work, that they would come back Tuesday and try to Iron out differences on such mn- Police Hunt Disgruntled Job Seeker Ohioan Uninjured! in Senate Office Building Subway BULLETIN Washington Two wiM pistol shots n-cl-o fired at Sena- tor Bricker (K.-Ohloj in the Senate subway today and a few hours Liter officers arrested suspect they described ax a for- mer member of Cie Capitol po- lice lorcc. Senate Serjreant ,it Arau Ed- ward L. McGinnlx Identified the suspect .is William L. arrest was made by metro- politan police in the northwest part of the city. the warden as Willie Bell, whose as- ____ ___sault upon him was a prelude to the week a special message of gunfire. Bell was wounded Ing a comprehensive flood the leg. plan for the entire Middle West, the i The wounded convicts were taken tlon voiced Minister V. time. by Russian M. Molotov Foreign at that "The time has come to remake White House announced .today. 'The message ,1s expected to go t both, houses 'about" "'o the week. Press Secretary Charles G. Bos said the flood control proposal wl embrace not only the Missouri val ley where recent floods have don extensive damage but the whol area from the Kocldes to the Ap palachlans. Ross would not go into detail a to the cost or any other features o the plan at this time. He said "Ot he scenes. Determined to send the bill to directed against any state or group of .states." The Hags of Russia, Finland and. Albania were among those flying from the roof of the ministry build- ing on the banks of the Seine, though those three countries had refused to attend. The conference was the first ma- jor meetlng.on Europe's future since the war In which Russia was not .1 ._ J President Is working on the messag any WBy today and expects to spend more rw ttrnun ti __ ___ ...-V. ____ he White House quickly. Assistant represented. On-the Moscow radio, FEDERAL FORECASTS Wmona and vicinity Partly cloudy tonight and Sunday with oc- casional local showers tonight, cnd- ;ns Sunday forenoon. Cooler Sun- day. Low tonight G5; high Sun- day 82. Minnesota Clearing west nnd scattered thundershowers east por- tion early tonight. Partly cloudy arid somewhat cooler Sunday. Portly cloudy this afternoon with scattered thunder-1 showers northwest and extreme nofih. Local thundershowers most sections tonlpht or early Sunday. Clearing Sunday afternoon. Some what cooler Sundny. LOCAL 1VEATIIF.ll Olflclal observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 88; minimum, GO; noon. 84; precipitation, .05 of an inch; sun sets tonight at sun r.aes tomorrow nt TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pet. I Bernidji 82 03 Denver 92 58 DCS Molnts 7G 68 ,02 Duluth ............70 CO Los Angeles........ 81 CO Mpls.-Sl. Paul -----89 GD Phoenix ...........110 09 Majority Leader Wherry (R.-Neb.) >aid he planned a rare Saturday light session unless the Senate ac- eptcd during the day the bill al- eady rcpassed by the House to slash Income taxes 30 to 10.5 per cnt beginning January 1. Senator Barklcy the Demo- rat Jc leader, asked Wherry during ebatc late yesterday whether he roposed a Sunday session. "We'll cross that river when we ome to the Nebraskan snapped. A two-thirds majority, of both ouscs Is required to make the b. iw over Mr, Truman's objection uch a ratio appears likely In th where the bill passed 30 112. The division of sentimen n the Senate, however, admitted: s much closer. Supporters of the cut say they ca count at least 60 favorable votes. RIVEK BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-Hr. Stage Today Change .1 1 City....... 8.1 Reads 12 Dam 4. T.W. 6.5 Dam 5. T.W. 3.5 Diun 5A, T.W, 4.0 Wlnonn (C.P.J Dam 0. T.W. 5.4 Dakota iC.P.) 7.8 Dam 7, Pool D.G Dam T.W. 3.0 A La Crosse 12 5.8 Tributary Streams Chlppewa at Durand 2.1 .1 Zumbro nt Tnellman 2.3 Buffalo ubovc Alma 2.0 Trempcaleau at Dodcc .8 Black nt Nclll.si-lllc 2.B Black at Galosvllle 2.0 La Crosse at W, Salem at Houston .2 filVEK FORECAST (From Ilastlncs to GuttenberK The Mississippi will continue fall- at ail tallwater Kaugcs until normal low water elevations nrc reached. Lower pools will not ctmngc much. Czechs Sign Economic Treaty With Russia Prague Czecho-Slovakla communist premier, Klement Gott wald, announced today that a new five-year economic treaty has been signed with the Soviet union. "Among Its the pre mler wild in a radio address "Czecho-Slovakla Is to receive from Russia tons of 'wheat and 200.000 tons of fodder, presumably within the next 12 months. This will be in return for exports anc manufactured products of Czecho- slovak heavy and light Gottwald and Foreign Minister Masaryk returned by plane this morning from Moscow, where they negotiated the pact. Ruttia Directly From U. S. Soviet writ- ers asserted today In Pravda, communist party newspaper, that eastern European nations were interested in receiving American directly from the creditor and not through Britain and France, "There Is no wid the article by Mar- inln and Lcontlcv, "that for a speedy, raccessfnl fulfillment of the planned development of the Industry and agriculture of Po- land. Yugoslavia. Czecho-Slova- kla, Romania, Bulgaria, Ilun- and other countries, foreign credit! are required." Commentator Viktorov said it was "doomed to. failure." British-French Invitations to the meeting .went out to 22 nations a week ago last- Thursday. La Crosse Telephone Stock Issue Authorized Madison, Wto. The La Crosse Telephone Company was authorized by the state public service commission today to issue shares of 110 par value com- mon stock. time 'on It next week. The message will precede th< President's message based on the latest report from his economic ad- visers. The President told his news con- ference Thursday that he is still In support of legislation to establish a Missouri Valley Authority. He add- ed, however, that this would not meet present emergency flood con- a-ol needs on the Missouri, Ohio and Des Molnes rivers. Forest Fire Rages Along 25-Mile Front Near Anchorage Anchorage, A for- est fire shrouded in towering smoke clouds raced today along a 25-mile front toward the Kenai peninsula village of Kasllof, but swamps and cleared land in the lire's path-were believed sufficient to save the set- tlement. I to 'a Brunswick hospital, where two were released to Jail after first aid remained hospitalized', were under heavy guard. Worthy said the trouble began at the camp with the arrival yester- day of new prisoners who refused to work on the Jesup highway and were returned, to the prison camp about 4 p.'m. when the men refused to leave the trucks in which they had ridden back to camp, the war- den said he called fof aid from the Glynn county police. His account continued: Police Chief Russell B..Henderson of Glynn county told the prisoners ;o obey the .warden and "cut out that foolishness." When the Negroes left the trucks, they' were lined up in the prison en- closure and addressed by Henderson. At the end of the police chief's re- marks, the men broke and ran. Some to the barracks. Others, how- Early-Arriving Governors Discuss Presidential Race Salt Lake-Citr W) Talk of who's who in the 1848 presidential candidacy today among the advance guard of dele- gates to the governors' conference which Includes at least two likely prospects for the G.OP. nomina- tion. The "Solid South" Is solidly be- hind President Truman lor the Democratic nomination, Governor Millard F. Caldwell of Florida re- ported as Governor Thomas E. Dewey of New Vork and Qovernor EarJ Warren of California, both re- garded as strong contenders for the O.O.P. candidacy, headed toward this city. Warren and Dcwey were named as top prospects for the nomina- Washington (ff) Two shots were fired harmlessly at Senator Bricker to the Senate of- fice building subway today by a man described by Bricker as a dis- gruntled patronage seeker. Brickor was Hot Injured. He told control, additional funds for the state hospital, and a score or more of less important issues. All plans to adjourn or recess the 68th session of legislature this week went by the boards when the two houses ran into a Jam on the school old one or the most con- ;roverslal Issues that has been be- fore them In years. The school aid bill Is now back in the lap of the senate lor con- sideration by that body as a spe- cial order of business next Tuesday afternoon. The assembly sent the measure back to the senate yester- day after refusing to adopt the sen- ate amendment that would elimin- ate all new taxes to finance the ad- ditional aids. 20 Per Cent Surtax The measure that be -.con- sidered by the senate calls for a 20 per cent surtax on Income taxes to give elementary and high, schools more state aid. The bill as approved originally by the assembly late in June called for a 40 per cent surtax on income taxes which would provide about in additional school aids. The senate amended the measure Thursday night to do away with the debate was under way on the re- surtax feature and cut the addi- vlvcd Income tax cut ever, crawled under the building, which stands about two feet off the round, and then- ran toward the ence on the other side. This "break" coupled with Bell's .ttack on the warden, brought about he shooting-. 10 Injured in Political tioting in Budapest Some 50 persons ursed injuries today as a result of treat rioting yesterday in which fitnesses said, communists attempt- d to break up a Budapest meeting the Hungarian Freedom party. tlon by Republican Governor James L. McConaughty of Connecticut. The opening session Monday will be devoted to discussions of states' rights and responsibilities. Speakers will Include Governors tlonol aids to for the bicnnium. When the measure came back to the assembly yesterday that body decided to cut the surtax to 20 per snots were blank cartridges. Appnrently unperturbed incident, the Ohio senator and 1944 vice-presidential candidate continu- Scnator John W. Bricker ed on to the Senate chamber cent. Liquor Tax Bill Also confronting the senate next Thomas J. Herbert of Ohio and Beaufort H. Jester of Texas. TJ. S, Secretary of State George C. Mar- shall will address the gathering Monday night. More than 20 of the governors were due today, with the expected Sunday. others Two Winona Boy Scouts Set for Trip to World Jamboree in France Two Winona Boy Scouts, Rober McQueen and Thomas Clayton, bot members of troop six, Centra Methodist church, will join 30 othe Scouts from region ten on a tri to Prance where they will tak part in the sixth world jamboree o scouting. Eight Scouts from the Game laven Scout area of which Wlnona s a part, will take -part in th amboree. Region ten consists o Minnesota, North and South Da rota and partc .at Wisconsin and Montana. The Scouts will be at Camp Ton- cowa, Minneapolis, from July 15 to "uly IB and will then go to Camp Kilmer, N. J., where they will mee with other Scouts and leaders rom all over the United States. On July 24 the group will sail on n army transport and land at Belgium port. They will spend two ays touring historic places in that ountry and will then go to Mols- on, France, for the jamboree which '111 be held from August 0 to 21. 'he Scouts will return to tho nlted States September 1. In addition to Clayton and Mc- ;ueen, others from the Gamehaven rea who will go are Odel and ames Lee, Mabel; Peter Gentling, ex Nelson and Wlnchell M. Craig, r., Rochester, and Edward Ellis, Owatonna. Michael Galvln, -Jr. t. Paul, a former member of troop Winona, will also be among Minnesota Scouts at the jamboree. Clayton who Is 14-years-old Is IB son of Mr. and Mrs. R. 9. layton, 528 West Broadway. Mc- Queen, 16-years-old, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. K. A. McQueen, Gil- more avenue. Two Trainmen Killed in California Derailment Los Angeles Two trainmen men were killed but no others were injured when a westbound Southern Pacific freight train locomotive overturned and ten cars were de- railed last night at El Casco, Calif., five miles' cast of Redlands, rail- road officials announced here. Engineer S. Whitlock of Glen- dale, Calif., and Fireman M. L. Per- klns of Los Angeles were crushed to death underneath the engine when it turned over on its side. Southern Pacific officials said the souce of the accident had not been determined. week will be a bill that doubles taxes on liquor and beer and pro- vides for veterans' hous- ing. In a surprise move the as- sembly pulled that bill out of a committee, approved it, and sent it to the senate yesterday. Meanwhile, the assembly on Tues- day will have before it a bill ap- propriating from the general fund to build two wings to the Wisconsin General hospital. bill. Also before the assembly will be a measure providing for rent In- creases of 15 to 20 per cent lor apartments or homes and 25 per cent for hotel rooms upon expiration of federal controls. This measure was also approved by the senate yesterday and sent Immediately to the other house. Legislative action on an assembly- approved measure appropriating for additional state-oper- ated PM stations was concurred In by the senate 22 to 5 late yesterday and the bill now goes to Acting Gov- ernor Oscar Rennebohm, Thye Asks Time Limit on Sauk Rapids Bridge Washington Senator Ed- (R.-Minn.) Friday in- ward Thye troduced a bill to extend until October, 1949, the time limit for construction of a bridge across the Mississippi river at Sauk Rapids, Minn., and was co-author of one authorizing the agriculture commit- tee to make a study of pending farm legislation and future culture legislative needs. agri- Two Minot Men Killed in Light Plane Crash Esmond, Minot, N. D., railroad men were killed last night when the plane one of them owned and was piloting crashed into a nearby wheat flcld, The victims were identified as A. L. Laird, about 50, a Great North- ern railway engineer who was pi- loting the ship, nnd Clarence Carl- son, a fireman for the same road, his passenger. The two men had ended their run about 3 p. m. and told Minot air- port officials they Intended to fly to Devils Lake. Later Bricker risked that Cnpltol police begin a search for his as- sailant. Ex-U. S. John Eckler, administrative as- sistant to the senator, told report- ers the man who iired the shots had lost his job on the govern- ment payroll. Capitol police sold the weapon used apparently was a .22 caliber pistol. Empty shells of that type were found in the subway. "The man has talked -with Senator Bricker numerous times." Edtler said. "He complained that he had. lost some money in a building and loon association some years back. But tlie senator said he could do nothing about it." As Bricker went .down to the Senate office building basement about noon to ride the monorail un- derground car to the Capitol, Eckler sold, the man approached, drew a pistol and fired. Shots Believed Blanks "Senator Bricker told the car op- erator, "We better get out or here, I thick that man is Eckler recounted. A second shot was fired as car moved away and the man with the gun disappeared. Eckler said the theory the may have been blanks resulted Irora failure to find any traces of bullet marks. News of the incident spread about the Capitol and Bricker soon was surrounded by other senators on the floor. He laughed as he told about what had happened. U. S., British Showdown on Socialization oi Ruhr Seen Wuhinrton between the United A showdown States and Britain this month over socialize- William Draper, his economic ad- viser, will represent him at the Washington conference. Clay also .announced that, at a meeting- with tlon of the Kuhr coal mines in an agreement was reach- British zone of Germany was pre-Jed between Britain and tho United dieted by diplomatic officials today. States on a new level of Industry lor The occasion is the forthcoming their economically merged occupa- Anglo-American conference here on tlon zones in Germany, methods of boosting Ruhr coal pro- Terms of the pact will not be made] duction as an essential step in Eu-, public before next Wednesday. Republican-Herald photo Final Preparations for a trip to Europe, Wlnona Boy Scouts Robert McQueen, left, and Thomas Clayton check over their equipment. Scout Clayton's dog, Inkle, looks on with interest. ropean recovery. The meeting was announced late yesterday by the State department. Officials said it was hoped that the Announcement, of the conference on the eve ot the opening of the Paris meeting to draft a joint re- covery program for Europe was rc- talks would begin within ten days jgarded here as highly significant. and that General Lucius D. Clay might head the American delegation and Lieutenant General Sir Brian Robertson the British group. They ore commanders in zones of Germany. the respective In Berlin, Clay said Major General Economic authorities of the State department said that unless ar- rangements con be made to boost Ruhr coal output from around 000 tons daily to near tons any kind of real European recovery would be hard to put over. Unification Bill Passes Committee Washington A House ex- penditures subcommittee today ap- proved a. measure providing for uni- fication or tlie armed services but with soinc changes in tbc bill as it passed the Senate. Chairman Hoffman told reporters he will call the lull committee together on Monday to speed the measure to the House floor. Chief differences la the bill Irom the Senate version ore these: 1. The House bill would provide that the director of the office of central intelligence should be a civilian. Under the Senate bill, the director could be either a civilian or a military man. 2. The House bill would provide no police authority, no internal se- jCurlty powers and no subpoena, au- [thorlty for the office or central in- telligence. The Senate measure docs not Include these clauses. 3. The House bill would order preservation or at least the pres- ent size and Junctions ot the ma- rine corps. There is no similar tn tho Senate bill. the House follows the Generally, however, subcommittee measure lines of the bill passed Wednesday by the Senate.   

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