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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: June 4, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 4, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER tnnliht, Full Leased Wire News Report of The Associated Press N EWS PICTURES Best In Local md WJtephotos Daily VOLUME 47. NO. 91 WINONA. MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING, JUNE 4, 1947 Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulations FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES 12 Drown As Lake Superior Boat Sinks Vermont Dam Bursts; Evacuated Four Missing; Rutland Isolated by Flood Waters Kutl.ind, VI. Ar. four were of them' r this elly of 1H.OOO v.-ria.illy I.'.ol.'itcd today In tlif wnke ;i roarlni: flood that caused dam- estimated at more than 000 and left upwards of 500 persons largest In Ver- without water, gas and electricity. j thc worst appeared with rlcarmg weather, was' virtually ar ft standstill as everyone: pitched in to clear debt Is and help! homeless. i No casualties have been ofllclally. reported, but four persons are llst-i Workmcn Today Were Removing flood water debris from tho power station at Rutland, Vt., In an attempt to get power back to the city. Electricity has been oft since flood waters washed through town last night when a dam above the town gave away. Rutland lx the second largest city in Vermont and hundreds were homeless as the waters spread. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Bernard Cohen and one of children. Philip nine. Rifhjird Lavlctorre, about ten. Kviicuutrcl More than were r-. uruutcd ar. Hie Hood waters on this city after breaking t.'irouch the Kast Pltt.sford dam, five mlkv; to the north. j I'.oth water inaiiir. leadliu; from a1 riiv reservcilr burst, i 1'iitilir Work.-. CdiiiinlsMfiner WII-I Kallie estimated It would be! bri ween two arul .srveii rlny.s before etjuld bf re.'itorcd. .vctlfm of tho community were inundated, at. least BOO rcsl- friii Truman Expected to Act Soon on Tax-Cutting Bill and the Treasury looked to Presi- dent Truman today for quick action on the income tax cut bill. Tho chief executive has ten days, not counting Sundays, to ap- Cigarette Tax Hike in Wisconsin Draws Opposition Mndlnon. It the state s money for the Improvement prove or veto It. However, Presidential Secretary Charles G. Ross told newsmen to- day the President will not act on the bill before he KOCS to Kun.sn.s Armed Forces Merger Bill Advanced Separate Units Under Security Secretary Asked Washington The Senate irmcd .services committee today un- animously approved legislation to nil the nation's military and naval 'orces under a single secretary of lational security. The bill specifics that ihe army navy and a separate air force are to be under "unified direction" to pro- vide for their "authoritative co- but are. .not to be merged. Eisenhower Backs Measure When announcing the committee action, Chairman Gurney (R.-S.D.) made public a letter from General Dwifiht D. Eisenhower, army chief of staif, endorsing the unification bill. Eisenhower expressed belief that the "legislation in its present 'form presents a. thoroughly practicable organization of the armed services which will permit us with increased economy and efricicncy to do our, xirt In the preservation of the' Juaco and, If need be, prosecution' of war.'1 j President Truman has irged enactment of an armed scrv-i Shown Above Is The Canadian steamship Emperor which sank In Lake Superior early this morning with the loss of at least 12 lives. (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Emperor Goes Down With 35 on Board Two Missing From Crew of Canadian Freig-htcr crew members were reported drowned and two others were missing early today after the heavily ore-laden steamer, Emperor, struck a rock and sank, in fog-shrouded Lake Superior off lonely Isle Royale. Twenty-one survivors were taken to Fort Williams, Ont., a Lake Su- perior port a short distance north of the Minnesota boundary. The freighter, operated by the Canada Steamship lines, Ltd., struck a rock at a. m. about five hours after she sailed from Port Arthur, Ont, for Ashtabula, Oliio. Captain Norman Reoch of Mon- -real, operating manager of the line, Istcd Captain Eldon Walklnsraiwr of Collingwood. among the victims. He said the first mate. second engineer, three cooks nnd ive other crew members also drowned. cc unification measure. The Senate's Republican policy City Friday morning. He said hns docketed the. bill for] did not know whether Truman] action clurlni? this session of Con- would act before he leaves for Can- Krcss, probably next month, ada next Monday or not. Universal TraininK The bill on which the Senate completed congressional action yes- terday is designed to take cl'l'ect IV.-vtcr Jturlrs Vehicles Many evacuees were taken out in yesterday. Proponents of n senate had police and per were challenged to nnd a solu- the water hit the city. reported that the water r.-imr in so fast that ft vrjjiclra attrniptlnj: to run burled ahead "Are stale Institutions -only "the responsibility of cigarette Nick Novaslc of Milwaukee, a vend- ing machine operator asked. Senator Schlnbnch Crosse) one of the bill's authors, said he "wasn't particular what tax was reached this, Just so long as the money writ that the town of 1'roctor, west raised of this community, also had been The Damage war. estimated unofficial- ly al hundreds of thousands of dol- hit hard. The reports could not bf fonflrmfd Immediately ar, tele- phone rommunlcntJonj were out. Russ Newsman Barred From Southern Korea Lieutenant General Hodge today refused to The neglect of Institutions of the state In the past 50 years has been criminal, Senator Buchen (R.-She- Srool John R. t.n enter .southern Korea until Russians agree to allow all Ameri- can correspondents in Seoul to cn- fr Soviet-occupied northern Korea later. The joint Swirl-American com- ir.iision .-.Peking to set up a pro- visional KovcrnrneiH for all tit Korea eurrrn: i.-. meeting in Seoul. a co-author, said, adding that "people don't care about their pennies when buying cigarettes." Labor union representatives, In a hearing before the senate's labor and management committee, urged news c ,rresm nd Ull! recommend that correspond- (h hnnse rnnnpxr. inrinf- Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS and vicinity Cloudy, local showers tonight. Thursday, partly cloudy: no Important tctnpcr- Bture chance. Low tonight 58; high Thursday 74. Minnesota: Partly cloudy sollth- the upper house request an inite postponement of a labor bill which has won the approval of the assembly. Acting Governor Oscar Renne- bohrn signed Into law yesterday a pension consolidation measure which hud been Introduced by a Icgl.ikitlve Interim committee. The bill consolidates pcnson plans for i state employes, the municipal re- I tlremcnt system, conservation war- dens and police and firemen of sec- ond and third cJos.'; cities. July 1. That thousands of means hundreds of revised withholding tax instructions and forms will have, to go out to employers all over the country in the next three weeks if the bill becomes law. Most with- holdings would be cut 20 or 30 per cent the first of next month, Decision Thin Week Secretary of the Treasury John W. Snyder Indicated a decision might be reached ut a special cab- inet meeting Thursday. The President is due to leave Fri- day on a week's trip that will take him to City and Ottawa. One Dei official on cnpi- tol hill toll, oportcrs last night that mless Mr. 'inmn has a last-min- ute change mind, he will veto the bill. But speculation continued rife Effective July 1 The schedule of cuts: On net Income, after exemptions deductions, of or less. 15 per cent In 1947, 30 per cent in 1948 ,nd subsequent years. From to uts of ten to 15 per cent this year, 0 to 30 per cent thereafter. Meanwhile President Truman nsk- cd Congress today to give "early con- sideration" to tho subject of uni- versal training. He made the request In sending to the legislators the report of his advisory commission on universal! would retain no bases whatever Tpnnrt: it __ Britain to Retain No Bases in India, Mountbatten Says New Viscount Mount- fatten, viceroy of India, promisee the Indian people today that Britain training. The report, public by the White House earlier thlb week, recommended universal train- Ing and said the United States musl strengthen its defenses or invite 'extermination" In atomic warfare Jackson Man Missing After Leaving Hawaii Jackson, ,A. Tordscn said last night he had west and occasional showers north .started a search for Reuben G H. Prom JMOO to per cnt off this year, 20 per cent there- after. From to per cent oft this year, 15 per cent there- after. All taxable Income above per cent off this ycnr, 10.5 per cent thereafter. within the subcontinent when in de- Is a- Action Asked on Extension of Some War Powers Tru- man asked congressional leaders of both parties today to speed action on his requests for extension of cer- tain powers due to expire June 30. would be indepcn- Mr. Truman called on them to clent both of British and each other complete pcndence chlcved under the new British plan. "I think It would be most Improper for any foreign power to have bases1 in the viceroy told a news conference. He made it plain that under thc plan, announced yesterday, Hindu- stan (Hindu In- dia) and Pakistan (Moslem India) Success in Argentine Bid For U. S. Arms Predicted By John M.Hifhtower Washington Diplomats look today for Argentina to be successful in its loner bid to get United States arms, now that but. national park At Windsor. officials of the line the Emperor carried a crew of but no passengers. The scene of the sinking WHS off Jsliimi Llyhj, whore n wide but rock-studded channel connects upper Lake Superior with Thunder I buy. The area Is near I.-Jc Royale, a Mountbatlcn hurry enactment of bills, now pend- ing. 1. Extend Uio Maritime commis- sion's authority to charter oil tank- ers. Speaker Martin said the Presi- dent asked this especially to avoid a possible oil shortage In eastern states this winter. The commission now operates more than 200 tank- rs. 2. Extend for one year the ex- port-control act. This would apply to certain articles still In short sup- ply. Extension legislation has been On another angle of the tax front I approved by the House armed serv- portions tonight. Thurs-l a ways and means subcommittee voted yesterday to freeze the social security tax for two more years at the present rate of one per cent each on, employers and employes. Mines Derail Two Trains in Palestine Jerusalem British authori- day generally fair south, and cloudy from since late February when he scattered light showers north, supposedly left Honolulu for the change In temperature. bedside of his wife, seriously ill here. uAtiieui laritisn auinon- who has not been announced today that two trains and slightly cooler north, I.Of'AI, O.'fi'-i.i: observations for thc ciidlnc lit 12 rn. today: Max.mum. Tl; minimum. 55: noon. .IJfl; sun sets to- ,-it sun rises tomorrow i i Max. Mln. Pet.! were derailed on the Palestine coastal plain this morning by mines apparently planted by the Jewish underground. A fireman aboard one train was reported injured, but there was no other immediate information concerning casualties. ices committee and nlso is before the Senate judiciary committee. 3. Extend certain allocation and priority controls under the second and that neither could control the other on the question of remaining within the British commonwealth. Both will have dominion status for the transitional period. Native Slates The native (princely) states two countries have quit Blaring at one another. They say that sale of American military equipment to the Buenos Aires government is one of three major developments likely to follow yesterday's White House con- ference re-establishing formal good relations. Defense Treaty The turn came when Prcsideni Truman Indicated to Argentine Ambassador Oscar Ivanlssevich this country's willingness to sit down with Argentina -and the other American republics to draft n mu- tual defense treaty. Besides the arms sales, diplomatic authorities also predict: 1. Holding of the Inter-Amer- ican defense conference at Rio do Janeiro, Brazil, in July or August U arrangements can be made in time. 2. A re-estimate of the poli- tical situation in South America as a result of the changed re- lationship between Buenos Aires and Washington. Some of the small nations around Other Nations Oppose Russia on Global Police Lake-Succewi The World's other major powers lined up Russia In the United Nations Secur- ity council today as delegates pre- pare to open general debate on the long-delayed organization of a glo- bal police force. The United States, scheduled to speak early In the meeting, was ready to support solidly the basic report of the military staff commit-1 from which the Soviet Union hns dissented on more than a third of the basic principles. Other members of the committee miles out in Lake Superior from Michigan's northernmost Up. The Emperor went down In about 64 feet of water. Details of the I sinking were meager. Coast Guard Search A coast'guard picket boat from Harbor, Mich., and a plane from Traverse City. Mich., set out In search of the missing crrw members. At the time of the sinking, the temperature In. tJio area stood to the mid-thirty degrees, the coldest June 4 rending in Michigan's hls- The Emperor, a steel freighter 525 feet lonpr, built In ColUrur- wood in JS10 aiid is among about 75 vessels operated by Canada, Steamship. She cleared Port Arthur. Ont, at 11 p. ni. Tuesday southbound for Ashtabula with a load of iron ore. She was to have reached Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., tonight. Hull Hipped Survivors said the Emperor struck Argentina which have been fearful ot President Juan D. Peron's dy- get their own Independence from Britain's paramount authority as soon as power is transferred In the rest of India, Mountbatten said, and will be free to choose whether they will be independent or will join Hin- dustan or Pakistan. The viceroy made it clear that leaders of the major Indian parties wanted no provisions in the plan which would have permitted "Bal- canization of India." He said It war powers act. This applies .to probably would be a matter of geo- foods, fertilizers and other scarce graphy which section of India the commodities. Bills are before the judiciary committee of both houses. The House committee has sched- uled hearings for Friday and the Senate group next Wednesday. U. S. and Argentina Nations May Be Friendly Again, Patch Up Dispute nivrt: Paul 70 OR "i By Norman Carijfnan, T A.P. Fbreifi-ii News Analyst The United States and Argentina are going to be friends again but Just how friendly? This Is thc question that remains paramount In the wake of President Trjman's patchlnR up ot U. S. differences with thc Peron government yesterday. TW Tributary at Du.-and Z'jazro a1. Theilman above Alma T.-err.pralriiu at Dodge Ulark ar Nclllsvlllc Bluri: a: Galesvllle L-i Cros.se a: W. Salem The.se troubles centered around .itiiirr 2'1-Itr I Argentine to clean house ol .itv-Tciday NIIV.I Influences there. The White House Indicated It Is satis fled with Argentina's perform- ance but wants to talk It over with the Latin American governments before saying so publicly, Diplomats say It Is a cinch that i when thc formalities are over this TJ. problem will have been removed. 0.0! What they are concerned about o.l now are these I. The long-range U. S. policy toward Argentina. fundamcntal Ideas on U. S. Latin American Policy. Oversimplified, thc problem Is: Southern Coal Negotiations Break Down nego- tiations between John L. Lewis United Mine Workers and southern coal operators broke down today. Ten minutes before tho talks were scheduled to resume, the TJ.M.W. representatives notified operators they would not attend because the mine owners yesterday had made public their wage proposals. These princely states would join; To Maintain Peace Mountbatten emphasized that he had no intention of imposing Bri- tish will upon the Indians on any question. "Will you please believe he said. "I am quite sincere. You must Braden Retigm Washington President Truman today announced the Tcsiimation of Spruillc Braden as assistant secretary or state. Braden is a fortner ambassa- dor to Argentina and long was at the center of controversy within the administration over United States-Argentine rela- tions. There have been reports that he wanted to leave the depart- ment but was waiting until the outcome of the differences with Argentina. of admirals and Canoo Rocks, a mile and a half States, Britain, Prnnce and were in general agreement. Viewing the international force as the core of the whole XT. N. se- curity system, a spokesman for Hcr- schel V. Johnson said the American deputy delegate would appeal for full and open debate on the Issue within the council and for early establishment of the International army, navy and air force. mmic policies may want to know now how far the United States will ontinue to support their resistance o any pressures from Peron to decide these questions for your-1 bring them into an Argentine orbit. selves. You can't always run to Bri- tain to settle all your problems." Moreover, Mountbatten declared that the full force of Indian military strength would be used, if necessary, to maintain peace during the tran- sition period. included an offer ot an 85 cents daily pay increase 121 return tor abandonment of portal-to-portnl pay time for underground travel in the mines Military Mission Arrives in Turkey Istanbul, Turk- ish government dropped a veil of secrecy today around the move- on "its "anti-Axis'promises'.' Ivanlssevich reviewed steps by the Pcron administration to rid Argen- tina of Axis agents and interests and Mr. Truman told him in re- sponse that the United States is willing to renew its consultations with other governments concern- ing the Rio conference. Blocked Conference The United States had blocked ;his conference for more than a year on the ground that it was un- willing to take part with Argentina until that country had made good ments or the TJ. S. military com- mission now studying the needs of ;he Turkish army under President Truman's aid program. The commission arrived here yes- terday and In conformity with a Laurence E. Ticrney, Jr., order no Turkish newspaper man of tho negotiating conference, told reporters that tho union rep- Shall the United States under thci ''csentatlves hud warned the oper- good neighbor .policy treat all tnoy "WCI'C not coming back" d.'.i 2. The fundamental American pol- 0.0 i Icy toward all the Latin-American i countries. O.ot Eoth tic In together because they 0.1: seem to be recurrent. It Is well established now that l.K FOKE'OAST 'From Hastings to CJuttenborK') The Mississippi will eontlnue fall- this district the re- wri'k v.'Jth nvt-rnce of .2 fool at taihvatL-r 0.1 
                            

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