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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: June 3, 1947 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 3, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER tonljtht anil vMth N EWS PICTURES next In Loc.il and Wircphotos Daily Full Leaied Wire Newt Report of The Associated Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 90 WINONA; MINNESOTA. TUESDAY EVENING. JUNE 3, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY. FOURTEEN PAGES British Plan to Yield Authontyinjndia Natives to Decide on Dual State Senate Votes Cut in Taxes Taft Says Truman 'Can't Afford' to Veto Measure ooo-n-yi-ar income tax cut cleared t.'w todny nnd hearted for the House, where Us fate Is ur.frr-aln. vote wns 48 to 28- Taft of Ohio, the Repub- policy committee chairman, declared today that President Tru- irinr. can't afford to veto the ooc'ooo income cut Dill "because would put him definitely on the jude of high taxes and high ex- Taft declared In ft statement that "Ml the want to keep tho iax ref-ipt.i up to In order to maintain high standard of Kovernment spending." seemed to be firneral agree- tnat the Senate would sustain Kir! Truman if he chooser, to disap- prove tr-.e Republican-backed bill. the White HOUM: was silent, Tr-.e House by a 220 to 99 Vote; gave Its bk-sMng to the, eompromlse legislation which would' cu'i' taxes beginning July 1 by a w.a.le ranging from 30 per cent smallest taxable incomes to :o.S per cent on the larscst ones. Man Returning to Jail Voluntarily Promised Parole Flve-Ycar-Old Michael Abruslo, diploma tightly clutched in his hand dozes of! during kindergarten exercises at Madonna House In Philadelphia while fellow classmates appear to be interested in the ceremonies, (A.P. Wirephoto.) Clark Asks Antitrust Probe Of Railway Car Builders Washington Attorney General Tom Clark said today he has a.skccl 41 grand Jury to Investigate alleged violations of the untUru.it Jaws In the railway freight car building Industry. Clark said In a statement that "certain corporations and Indl- j-ffervm City. aTC alleged to have engagedt in_ restraints of trade and !ii'.hop -4. who rrtunird voluntar- 10 reformatory -rsrn which he rscnprd six years fctro, hnd thn promise todny of his rrfrdom soon as he gets a pay- Jr.r Job. Bishop cucnprd In 10-11 from the rr 1C month.i or a MT.'.rncr Tor tampering with un n.u- six years :ibr.cncc he mnrrifd and 'joined the navy. and his wife now have three children. I.iirv mor.th he quit his Job In Ila- worki-d his way to tho West on u freighter, hitchhiked to Mifirourl nnd told authorities he wHntfd to complete his sentence, the pnrolr board inter- Tlrwed Bishop and decided to parole rjrn as nx hr is assured of psyinp Job. __ _ Virginia Man Bound Over for Bribery Trial Building Rules May Block Rent ontrol Conferees Senator Buck said today n disagreement over restrictions on building may be the chief stumbling block to final congressional action on rent con- trol.i. Buck heads the Senate conferees who will attempt to resolve differ- ences between the bill th Senate passed yesterday nnd one approved earlier by the House. Both extend rent controls beyond Junn 30 without general increase In ceilings. There arc, however, a number of differences. The Senate shouted approval of Its own measure after hearing Chalr- Tobcy of the bank- country for many months. --The Justice department said that subpoenas ore being issued "for the. production for a District of Colum- bia grand Jury, of certain docu- ments and records of the freight car building companies, railway and car building trade sissooiations and others." "This Clark said, "is the result of Investigation by the Fed- eral Bureau of Investigation of com- aitt rr.nchlr.rs a.ter Frank substitute nro- rrr.e-.rr ended his preliminary anns yem-rclay and ordered him KoserrX'ier ended the hear- 'ler Duvid Tobcy voted for a substitute pro- posed by Senator Taylor (D-Idaho) which would have extended present controls without any modification through June 30, 1940. The Taylor "he Judrc. At the morning JudKr Rowm.'ler warned using profanity and in a debate j substitute was knocked down by D8 to 1C vote. Buck told a reporter he does nol know present House sentiment on violations or the antitrust laws but mentioned no names. His announcement comes after an Floods Rout 100 Families From Homes Waters Recede in Pennsylvania, Ohio; Train Derailed By The Associated Press Torrential spring rains brought flash floods to nearly a score of communities In northwestern Penn- sylvania and Ohio, forced well over 100 families from their homes and caused the derailment of a passen- ger train, injuring clsht persons. Fifty families were driven from their homes at Springvillc when water reached the second-floor win- dows, and other families were evac- uated at Conneautville. And in the Columbus zoo, some of the animals stood in two feet of water, and boxes were placed on cages of small animals to keep them high and dry. Streams swollen by heavy spring rains receded and leveled off in northwestern Pennsylvania after wrecking a New York-Chicago pas- senger train by washing out a sec- tion of the Erie railroad bed. Eight persons were injured when a Pullman car of the Erie Limited wtis derailed last night. Most residents of Mendville, a city of who had anxiously watch- ed French creek rise In the night, relaxed their fears when a 12-foot crest passed at 2 a., m. Debris Hiph A big cleanup Job was left at sub- urban Kerrtown, where the main highway, connecting Pittsburgh with Eric and Cleveland, was piled with debris as high as 18 Inches. TorrcnUiil rains which caused Mitchell's run to overflow its banks washed away a portion of roadbed noar Cambridge Springs shortly be- fore the Erie Limited was due. The locomotive and a number of other cars passed safely over the waver- acuta freight car shortage in the ing raus bUt; car was derailed, causing Injuries to eight persons, including two trainmen. Flood Crests Jn Ohio Streams swollen by torrential spring rains rose to flood crests in Ohio today, forcing at least 80 fam- ilies from their homes. Firemen aided by volunteers res- cued 30 families in boats north of Dayton in the Miami river valley. Two breaks in a levee stranded cot- tages in flood waters six to eight plaints that railway freight deep. building companies have entered Twenty families were moved Iiom .......their homes in Snydcrville In low- lands southwest of Springfield as Mad river overflowed a wide area. Flood control Installations built in the Miami valley a generation ago, however, were expected to thwart any major Hood. 'he courtroom I Me he predicted an agrec- a'terr.oon M-v.Ion, liorgt-n'mcnt can-be reached "without too d ft'- crosx-cxnmlna- much trouble." He said that Housing Expediter A: tr. t.-r.T.rr.e of a -witness by John C. Arco, .St. county attorney. Frank Creedon, who would admln- dispute with Judge! ister the law under the Senate bill .-r.eir.-. nown remarked, "Well, I vc- told you off." hud not previously made it clear that he wanted to retain some con- el. court for trial." Kettering Leaves General Motors the rase." Judge. ROKC- trol over building materials "to do declare this hrurlnK.n better Job." defendant bound TlirouKh February 29 The House-approved bill knocks out Creedon's office entirely antJ leaves the determination of the itiKi-ncy to administer rent control up jlo the president. I The Senate adopted a provision Nrw York--v-Inventor out most controls over T Gcrifrul Motors Cor-, iorut.'..r. :od.iv H-. he retired as C..., tv. in.e of the research The House bill provides an cx- through December 31 but Trie-YsVpriratinn hoard of dlrec-jf'Uthorlxes the President to proclaim -Hwa C'harl'-.n I. MeCuen, an adcllMonal  rrh dl- KetlerlnK. Polish Attempt to Halt Black Market M Tin- Poli.'.h [inrlln- America Deports 36 Germans Germany i.lltlMiKnuui K, I Thirty-slit acrnuitw doportcd by the nnd M.u K market up in price Uniu-cl Stnte.i the department called them "n cargo of human be freed in their n _ fatherland in the next few days. "We're giving them brick to the said an ofllclul at the repatriation center hero where they Dependents wcro convictcd Monthly Tho other 29 wcro dc- Veterans clurod by the Justice department ri f..iid It Is "loo dangerous to stay in the United n.Stritr.-." nnd Included Naxl sympn- S. Oermim-Amerlcan inllllnry1 (IniTt dodHer.1 nnd tho UkC. Most of them were interned In tho Unit- it is vet Statex during the war. To reporters, the group protested ;o living'today aguinst their deportation and fcTl'.Ooo dependents they had done nothing to dc- -A-.VI dependents It. Some wcro concerned T.v.rld War about the life of (Ui.itcrlty they wero Into agreements with each other to fix noncompctitive prices for freight cars built by them for railroads and otjier purchasers, and have allocat- ed prospective railway freight car manufacturing business among the various companies in the Industry according to percentage quotas as- signed to various members of the Industry. "From that Investigation It ap- pears that four freight car build- ing companies have in recent years secured approximately 80 per cent of the freight car building busi- ness." Congressional committees have conducted long Investigations of the shortage of freight cars. The testimony of railroad officials was to the effect that it was due largely to wartime suspension of building of new cars, and the heavy strain the war placed on railroad rolling stock. Structural Defect Possible Cause of Maryland Crash of the Civil Aeronautics board today worked on a theory that a "struc- tural failure" occurred in the tall assembly of an eastern airlines plane which carried 53 persons to Conscription Hearings Ordered Houso armed services committee today ordered public hearings on uni- versal training- after Karl T. Compton termed the Interna- tional situation "too serious to justify delay." Compton, who headed Presi- dent Truman's advisory com- mission which recommended universal training, telegraphed thr committee: "There is no certainly that intrigue backed with force has been abandoned as an instru- ment for national agjrrandize- nicnt and unhappily the pres- ent actual evidence in some quarters points otherwise." Chairman Andrews (R.-N. IT.) told reporters hearings will start in "a week or ten days" before the full committee, with Comp- ton as the first witness. Coup in Hungary May Spur Quick Action on Treaties fall under communist domination even as Italy was ridding her government Ihelr death. Meanwhile a Senate commerce subcommittee headed by Senator Brcwster (R.-Me.> reopened a series of hearings on nir safety with an Invitation for Lnndls and T. P. Wright, Civil Aeronautics adminis- trator, to testify whenever conven- ient. could obtain government contracts for clients. Action on the appeal from yes- terday's decision might not be token until August as the Supreme court plans to recess for the summer after June 10. Curlcy was elected to his fourth- term as mayor in 1945 while under Indictment on the mail fraud charges. N. Y. Banker, Former MJnneapolitan, Dead Glen Cove, N. H. McOee, 01, a native of Devils Lake, N, D., and longtime Minneapolis resident, died at -a hospital here Monday. He had been a vtcc-prcr.l- dnnt of Hankers Trust Company, Now York, which he joined in 1010 after serving as chief of staff or the 77th division in World War I. He was a graduate of West Point. Of Soviet ties pro- vldod Senator Ar- thur Vandenberg (R.-M1C11.) with ready ammuni- tion today in his battle to win ra- tification of peace treaties with those and two other former enemy na- tions. Vandenberg told a reporter he In- tended to discuss recent Interna- tional devclop- mcnts In urging approval of the pacts which some of his Republican colleagues are ex- pected to oppose vigorously during Senate debate opening today. Treaties "Cannot Walt" He told the Senate today that the United States "cannot wait too much longer" for Soviet cooperation to make peace v.'Ith Germany and es- tablish an "Integrated Europe." Urging speedy Senate ratification of peace treaties with Italy, Bulgar- ia, Hungary and Romania, the chairman of the Senate foreign re- lations committee asserted that any delay may hold up action on agree- ments with Germany and Austria. Some day we shall get these other if, unhappily, we are forced by circumstance to organize peace Jn our own zones he declared in a prepared address opening the treaty debate. "I further believe that we cannot I wait too much longer for Soviet co- operations and consents in stabiliz- ing western and central Europe, al- though common consents and co- operations are still infinitely pre- he said. Vnndenberg the Senate foreign relations committee and is Capitol Hill's chief exponent of bipartisan foreign policy. Russian Troops The Michigan senator is report- ed to hold the view that the recent communist coup in Hungary should speed this country's acceptance of the treaty terms In order to get _ _------------------- _ _ Russian troops out of cra of Caving blue-printed lor- policy being handed to us by the president to approve." He added that the Republican ma- jority on the House foreign aflairs committee believes Congress, not the President, should shape foreign policy. Smith, a committee member ,who voted against -President Truman's Greek-Turkish aid pro- gram, told a reporter: "In the past few years Congress has taken orders from the Presi- dent, That practice will now be re- His comments followed initiation of a new committee plan by Chair- man Eaton (R.-N. J.) of the foreign affairs committee. Under this, six subcommittees will deal with vari- ous world problems. Smith was named chairman of the subcommittee on International organizations and international law includes a study of United Nations activities as they relate to this country. Two DIewel-Drnwn Monon freight trains crashed hcndon near Battle Ground, Ind.. today resulting in the death of at 'cost two trainmen. A third Is missing. This airvlow shows plleup of engines and cars. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Curley to Appeal Supreme Court Refusal of Case Boston W) Mayor James M. Curley will appeal to the U. S. Su- preme court to reconsider its re- fusal to reverse his conviction on mail fraud charges. The 72-year-old former governor and congressman said last night his counsel would Hie the petition with- in 25 days and Indicated he had no intention of resigning even if ho iuyulll. had to run the city of Irom cupatlon troops except thosc_necd- Curley faces a six to 18 months jail term and fine. He was convicted as one of a group who al- Escaped Elephant Invades Lansing Tulip Gardens Lanslne, a performing elephant with Mills Brothers circus, escaped the big top today and staged an unscheduled performance on the lawns and In the gardens of Lansing's south side. A housewife gave of the elephant's escapade when she telephoned police: "An elephant is trampling my tulips." Then reports came from everywhere, A state trooper and two circus trainers caught up with Burma; found her tangled in a backyard clothes line. With hundreds of spectators at a safe distance, the trainers took Burma In tow and back to the circus grounds whence she had broken her chains and wandered off unnoticed. As they stand, the written for Bulgaria and would require withdrawal of all oc- cupation troops except those need- ed to maintain communication lines to the Soviet zones in Germany and Austria. It was said to be the feeling of legedly falsely represented they vandenbcrg and others that the (Continued on Va.ge 4, Column 5) '.UNGAIIY May Refused Compensation, Garsson Says (JP) Munitions Maker Henry Garsson said today that he tried to give Andrew J. New York Boy, 8, Hangs Self While Playing New York Eight-year-old ____ _ Clifford Scott accidentally hanged] testified before a federal "compensation" for business help when May wns wartime chair- mun ot the House military commit- tec -but. May refused It. himself lust night, police said, while showing two companions the pen- alty for violating the code of their 'secret society." Police said the boys had decided an offender must hang himself un- til he counted five. The Scott boy placed 11 nooso around hln neck and kicked'a box from under his feet. Frightened, his companions ran for aid but the boy was dead when help court jury trying him. his brother, Murray, and May on war bribe charges. He related that May had been doing so much work for him in managing a Gavsson-flnanccd lumber firm In Kentucky ho sug- gested to May that he .should get paid for it. The witness added that May re- fused to take any money, contend- ing he felt "a moral obligation" to manage the concern profitably be- cause he had recommended that the Garssons buy the Cumberland timber tract as u means of getting lumber for gun shell crates. Role of Congress In Foreign Policy Stressed by Smith Gray Market 'Empty Steel Man Says Washington Representative Lawrence Smith (R.-Wis.) said to- day he will do what he can to "end 35th Infantry Vets to Build French Hospital Kansas Veterans of the 35th infantry division, President Harry S. Truman among them, will Taft Charges Administration_____ With A bandoning Price Cuts RCA Head Paid Robert to other countries for the purchase Last I ear iirc Iji-neflt'i- lU Wiir I veU-rim.i. facing n.-i citizen.1; of a conquered day. I Taft (R.-Ohlo) today President Truman and the Democratic ad- ministration seem to have aban- doned their campaign to keep prices down in favor of "heavy spending abroad that will keep them up." The Ohio senator told a reporter the .Senate-House committee on the economic report may order public hearings on the price situation at meeting scheduled Inter In the aid It Is his view that lotiru. of goods here Increase the compe- tition on home markets for those goods and thus force prices up. Mr. Truman, who has been, trying to talk prices down for weeks, has said nothing on the subject since a May 15 news conference when he said the country could avoid a de- pression if it Just uses common sense and doesn't let greedy people get control. Ho reiterated his eon- Piiilaelclpui.-i Russian-born David SnrnolT, who took a job 41 years ago as messenger boy with the Commercial Cable Company, received last year as presi- dent of the Radio Corporation ot America and director of the Na- OUlia u for a French town thcy liberated In World War II. All the money they spend for fun In their flrst postwar reunion Is go- ing into a fund for a sew hospital for St. Lo the town recaptured by the 35th and the break-through point of the Allied drive out of the Norman peninsula after bloody Omaha beach. Racine Boy Drowns in Rescue Attempt Racine, Wieczor- W. drowned while on lUiA ill Id w tionnl Broadcasting Company, nnd picnic yesterday in Browns lake near Burlington as he leaped Into RCA Communications Inc. Snrnoll's gross .salary was dis- closed in the annual report ot his tentlon then that some prices aroicompany filed with tho Securities too high. Exchange commission. the water to rescue a classmate. The classmate wns able to return to chc boat .'in which they and cwo others Jiavd. been riding. Two Trainmen Killed in Indiana Wreck Buttle Ground, Ind. Two trainmen were killed In the collision of two Dlcael-powcrcd Monon rail- road freight trains a mile and tt half north of here today. A third Is missing. Bodies of K. Young. H5, ot Lafayette, Jlrcman on the north- bound train, and. J. K. Robinson of Lafayette, head brakeman on the southbound train, were recovered from the wreckage. The trains were bound from Chicago and Indianapo- lis. Two other trainmen were Injured. They are Ray B. Tully, engineer of tho southbound train, and Hnydcn E. Meeker, engineer of the north- bound freight. Both are from Lafa- yette. Tully suffered only a dislo- cated shoulder but Meekcr's Injuries were described as critical. Both were taken to St. Elizabeth's hospital In Lafayette. Each train had a crew of five men. The wreck piled up about 25 cars. The cause of the wreck was not determined Immediately. L. Block of the Inland Steel Company in Chicago said today that reports of large sales of steel in a so-colled gray market arc "empty talk." Block, Inland's executive vice- president Jn charge of sales, told a Senate small business subcommit- tee, however, that "much to my surprise" several carloads of Inland steel were sold several months ago on the domestic market "at prices as much as three times their mill value." Block testified: "Many efforts have been made to locate the fantastic tonnages of- fered, but It has long been appar- ent that most of this Is Just empty talk engaged in by speculators and charlatans. "However, some steel actually shows up now nnd then." Block said tho steel which sold at treble value was rollci under ft conversion arrangement with the David L. Wilkoff Company, Pitts- burgh exporters, which supplied in- gots. He said Inland understood that the steel was to be exported. The committee hns heard previ- ous testimony that at least two air- loads of the steel were sold at a ton, compared to a normal mill price of about Dominion Status Offered Until Final Withdrawal in '48 British govern- ment announced today that It will transfer power In India to the In- dians almost immediately and leave It to the Indian people to decide whether there shall be one or wo governments. The announcement was made si- multaneously by Prime Minister AUlee in the House ot Commons; by Uie viceroy, Lord Mountbattcn, In iv broadcast to the Indian people, and by thn British government In a. white paper. Legislation will be Introduced during the present session of Par- liament for the transfer of power To Divide Country New Indian leaders advised the viceroy to- day they would divide the vast country between Moslems and non-Moslems and take over power from the Hritish peacefully as they knew how. This would mem the creation of two nations, each amonc the largest in the world in popula- tion. But in resources, it meant the creation of one relatively powerful nation composed most- ly of Hindus anil far powerful nation containing vant hulk of the Moslem pop- ulnllon of Jhidia. this a dominion status ba- one or two Indian govern- ments, depcndiHK on which system the Indian people subscribe to. Dominion Statux Thus until the absolute with- drawal of the British, scheduled for July of 1848. India will be composed of one or two self-govcrnlnK coun- tries which will belong U> the Brit- ish commonwealth of nations. A spirit of optimism seemed to pervade official circles in London nnd New Delhi, but authorities in India made It plainly apparent that they were ready to put down dis- orders with a hnrsh hand. Nevertheless, feeling continued to run high nnd an armed mob at- tacked .1 small village only four (Continued on TaRe 4, Column 4) INDIA Engineers From India to Inspect .U. S. Highways bureau ot public ronds announced yesterday a series of Inspection tours through- out the United States i'or 21 high- way engineers from India who havo been studying American construc- tion methods In Washington April. They will visit Wisconsin. Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS Wlnona and Vicinity Mostly cloudy and warmer tonight and Wednesday with local showers be- ginning Jntn tonight or Wednesday forenoon. Low tonight 55; high. Wednesday near 80. and -warmer tonight with scattered thunder showers. Wednesday partly cloudy with early morning showers. Some- what warmer cast portion. and wanner tonight with showers beginning along Mississippi river Jatc tonight and spreading to eastern portions by Wednesday afternoon or eve- ning Warmer Wednesday. LOCAL WEATHKR Official observations for the 24 hours ending nt 32 m, todny: Maximum. 70; minimum, 40; noon, C9; precipitation, none; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at TEMPERATURES Denver ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pet. 80 Duluth............. 55 Los Angeles .......73 49 41 55 Miami ..83 .02 Paul tiS New Orloims 9 Germans Die As Building Collapses Germans, in- cluding six women, were killed yes- terday when part of the former Belch's economic ministry collapsed while they were helping to clear the "building of rubble. The building is situated in. the Soviet zone. Red Wirg Lnkc City Rends Dam 4. T. W... Dam 5, T.W. Dam 5A. T.W. Wlnona (C.PO Dam G. Pool Dam 6, T.W... Dakota 
                            

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