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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: May 31, 1947 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - May 31, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER lonlihll Jinil ciml N EWS PICTURES Best in tocal and Daily VOLUME 41, NO. 88 Full Leased Win: News Report of The Associated Press WINONA Member of the Audit Bureau of MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 31. 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES World Plane Disasters Take 174 Lives 116 Killed in Minneapolis Trio Other HolidayjArrested Here on Accidents Minnesota Counts Three Drownings, One Traffic Victim It? The Associated I'rcs Thf nation went into the second tiny o'. the rxtrnded Memorial day -i-.vr.a with a death toll of nt Ira.'.: Vl traffic deaths nnd 33 ilrown- Wi..conMn had n record of at r.'.nr clciith.1., and In Mlnne- M.-.U thi-rr wav. oiu1 tnUlc death nnd throe drowninffs. two Thursday and one Friday. Earlier, the National Safety coun- c..: cs-.lmated motor accidents would t the lives of 275 persons dur- ir.i: the extended holiday wri-kcnd. Thf creatcst tr.iflc toll WHS rc- :r. where 13 mo- torist..'; met death on the lilfrhway. IJI.M year'.-, four-day Mcmortnl clay resulted In 292 violent Inc.udlnv: KM traffic fatiill- Mlnnrsota A youth who was to have been Mi.u'.at'T.iin nf Ills AUlrn, Minn., school cln.vs drowned lit Albert Ix-n Friday, Herbert Hrnschr. student mnn- nKtr for Aidcn Hlch .school athletic 1 earns the past two drowned :r. Fountain lake when a canoe In which he was riding with Edgar Ar-.r.rrr.ann, 17, also of Aldcn, cap- .VearSy boaters rescued Ahncmann but Hcnicho was clcnd when his body was recovered 20 minutes later. Al- bert LTD. rlremen worked for nearly two hours in vain efortr, to revive victim. Ray Wcstra, 34, of Srboka, and Xenricth Blow. 3a, of Nimrod, drowned Thursday evening when their fishing boat capsized in Long near Hubbard. eight miles ioutheast of Park Rapids, Minn. Frederick COOK, 3C. of Red Lake WM injured fntnlly Friday when his car went out of control on the soft .'.nouldT of n highway a mllo wc.it qf Reel Lake and overturned. lie Sled an hour later of n. broken neck fractured skull. Thn boat's line became caught Rnd tho craft overturned when Westrii started the outboard motor. The boat was about 100 feet from Ahore. :n deep water at the lower end of thei lake. Bodies of the pair were recovered by Sheriff Runscll Ackerman. "Dr. Clifford Danlel.-.on. 40, of 4553 Harriet avenue, Minneapolis, und h'.s 13-year-old son, Jumcs, were brought to St. Joseph's hospital at Eral.nerd yesterday afternoon for treatment of Injuries suffered in an accident. Counterfeiting Charge World Joins U.S. Tribute To War Dead Il.v The Associated Press Men of all stations in the I'nitccl States and the far-dung places of the globe paid tribute .yesterday to America's solcliev ilcail. "We shall never forget said President Manuel KOXH.S of the Philippines in Manila, Hum- ming feelings of the thousands who gathered in the iiulet cemeteries from Anzio beach to Guam. Among those pausing in trib- ute at American graves In Kurope were Queen Yv'ilhel- mlna of the Netherlands. Prime minister IMcrro Uupong of Lux- embourg and Trench Premier 1'iuil Karoailler. In America speakers urged vigilance und preparedness. President Truman spent a ciulct day "catching up on his work" In the nation's capital and his wreatli was laid at the tomb of the unknown soldier In Arling- ton National cemetery an Aide. Friends and neighbors of the late President Roosevelt gather- ed at his grave for a service. Minutes after H was christened, Friday, the new Lake Mlnnetonka patrol speedboat went to the rescue of two University of Minnesota stu- dents whoso boat had tipped over, but othenvlse unharmed were Jack Watson, 20, Minneapolis, and Margaret Park. 25. Sanford hall. The dead In Wisconsin were: Coal Operators Reject Lewis' 55-Cent Demand Soft cool opera- tors representing 75 per cent of the bituminous Industry said today they have rejected John li. Lewis' de- mands for a 35 cents an hour wage Increase as1 "unreasonable." Negotiations between the opera- tors and Lewis for n new wage con- tract broke up suddenly after brief talks this morning, Just one. month before the government is sched- uled to return the mines to private ownership direction. Tho operators representing mines of the north and west told a news conference that they had countered Lewis' demands with an oiler to boost the miners' hourly wage rates, 15 cents from cents to cents. Cut in Work Day Lewis sought to cut the work day from nine hours to eight add- ing 20 cents to the miners' pay that wtly_and boosting the basic rate another 15 cents for ft total in- crease of 35 cents hourly. The operators said Lewis' wage Two Men, Woman Await Extradition to Montana Three Minneapolis residents, cap- tured at and near a Winona en- graving plant, are in a St. Paul jail today awaiting extradition to Mon- tana on a charge of attempting to counterfeit stamps. Montana state tax Truman Signs Relief Bill Marshall Given Broad Authority in Administration Tru- man today signed the bill for relief of war-devastated countries in. Europe and Asia. Presidential Secretary Charles G. Ross announced Mr, Truman's ap- proval of the measure, along with inritirt issuance of an executive order dele- dcnartment broad authority in adminis- m I-HP snoctacCfar of the relief program to cooperated in tne spcctacujdr cap- ture at the Winona of State George c. Mar pany plant, East Second street, about G p. m. Thursday when two of the three persons were taken, at the point of ftuns. The third, a woman, was captured in tho trio's car parked near the plant, Participating in the capture were Chief of Police A. J. Bingokl and Detectives Anton Knmla and Ever- ett Laak. of the Winona police de- partment: Norman Suderbm-K, Wl- norm, of the alcohol tax unit of the bureau of Internal rovciiue, and William P. Bennyhotr, of Lho Min- nesota bureau of criminal appre- hension. Guns Drawn gave final approval May 21 to the foreign relief measure which permits expenditure of funds in Italy, Greece. Hungary, Austria, Poland. China nnd Trieste. Of the a minimum of 000 is earmarked for the United Nations children's emergency fund. (The bill is entirely distinct from thu S400.000.000 program to bolster Greece and Turkey against com- Mr. Truman has yet to nominate administrators who actually will di- rect disposition of both funds. Rich- ard P. Allen, Red Cross vice-presi- dent, has been reported slated to get the job handling the relief Fire Engulfs A United Airlines plane a few minutes after it crashed as it was taking off from La -ei billow The officers secreted themselves _._ In the engraving plant before the I funds, in the bill approved by the Mill City men came and overheard president today. the completion of the transaction and delivery of the engraving plates before stepping out with drawn guns. The alleged counterfeiters protested their arrest, saying, "We haven't done anything but of- fered no resistance. Members of the alleged counter- feiting ring are Paul N. Brown, 32; Harry E. Goldle, 4G, who Sudcrburg said has been at Lcavcnworlh after conviction on a conspiracy charge, and Mrs. Jean Ann Meyers, 32. Sudcrburg said that the trio hod billow p re ngus Guardia airport, New York, Tail of the plane Js at the riRht foreground. Clouds of from the burning gasoline. Picture was made by an amateur photographer about two mtoutia after the plane crashed. (A.P. Wirephoto.) n- John demands alone would add C5 to 75 Just month before the government Is scheduled to return the mines to the owners. Southern Conferences There was no indication as to what the next move will be to get the operators togetner with Lewis, president of the United Mine Work- ers, and othur union representa- 20, Evansville: Alvln n (Continued nn Tare Column 5.) ACCIDENTS Ely, Minn., Fire Loss Elr. nnd Conferences for the other 25 per tnr 'owners of the property today cent of the industry. Involving tho survrvi-d debris left by a fire which'Southern Coal Producers nssocla- caUM'd r.n estimated S100.000 which requested separate ncBO- use in a two-story building in Ely's! tlatlons. were started with the clown, own section. I miners last The fire broke out Friday.! After two days of discussions, the Ely's volunteer Jlrrmcn battled ncgotlonas were recessed blaze for more than four hours be-'for the holiday weekend and are fo-c pu-'lr.R out The firemen os-jscheduled to resume next Tuesday they pnured 500.000 gallons I morning. water Into the burning of the uiimitKi- resulted from f.moke and water, John Alnlcy, pub- li.'.her of the Ely Miner, newspaper, .'.iiici. MOM of the clnmiiKc to the; t'Uilclini.: was clone In the false ccll- over the Mores on the tlrst Exact of the blaze has not been determined yet. The bulkllm: housed n drugstore, n meat and grocery store, a laundry t "ice and n department store. Sec ond-floor span: wa-s occupied by nri attorney, a beauty and a leivslng office for mln- rornpanles. St. Paul Grill Cook Shot by Patron St. Semrau, 57. cool: at a downtown cafe, was :n cri'.lcal condition today, victim of a Memorial clay shooting which resulted in the Jailing of n suspect. Semrnu was wounded by a bullet f'.rcd from the sidewalk throuch it jilatr claw, window of the cafe after h" had cjretecj a patron. Witnesses ifie patron refused to U-aVo i.fter told the cafe was clos- of Poliec Charles Tlerney j.aic; :.K.a: Cecil James Gray was be- held without eh.'trKc. When po- tooi: Into Tlcr- saltl, hi- told the otllceir. he kr-.ew what they wanted him for -Ahere to find a KUII. "Tl-.c fc-un you nrr looking for is at 2j E-.i.'.- Ti-r.ih strti-t. room Lewstcr McCauliffe ant! Burs, quoted him us saying. A waitress has Identified Gray as man who fired the shot that Semrau. Tlcrney said. In an executive order, Mr. Tru- man also authorized the assignment of government employes to Greece and Turkey in furtherance of the aid program, to those countries. Tho order authorizes that any civilian employe who is serving I under an appointment of not less than one year may be transferred to the staffs of the American mis- sions to be sent to. the Mediter- ranean nations. Mr. Truman ruled that such over- will be governed by which apply to the tho p and had offered down and of Bovernmont workers to on delivery of the engraving plates, the United Nations or other inter- Purpose of the plates, Suderbiirs said, was to print stamps to be af- fixed to punch boards, which were legalized recently in Montana. Each of two plate's the trio had in its possession when captured was designed to print 32 stamps in de- nominations of S2.25, S3 and I'lckup Arranged After the trio had come to the engraving plant Wednesday, the tip was received by law enforcement; officials and the pickup was ar- ranged. After the capture, tho trio was national orgnnixations. Truman to Visit Canada June 9 on Good Will Tour Tru- man will make an address in Kan- sas City next Saturday and leave for a good will visit in Canada the following Monday, the White House .announced today. taken to Rochester by prcss Secretary Charles G. Ross Bennyhoff, Kamla and Lank and tolcl rcportcrs Mr. Truman has "definitely decided" against mak- ing a trip to Alaska this summer. were turned over to Elmer Stovern, chief of the bureau of criminal ap- prehension. Today they arc in the Ramsey county Jail, and a Montana sheriff was expected in St. Paul today or Sunday to ask extradition to Mon- tana. The sheriff's office for Lewis and Clark counties, Helena, Mont., said that a fourth person, also charged with attempting to counterfeit Mon- tana tax stamps, was arrested three days ago and is being held at Glas- gow, Mont. Ross said the President "has no plan now for any vacation trip." The President will leave here by plane Friday morning for Kansas City. He will speak the next day before tho memorial reunion of the 35th division, his World War I Outfit, at the municipal -auditorium. On Monday, June 9, Mr. Truman will leave Washington by train for Ottawa, Canada, where it Is expect- ed he will parliament. 53 Dead in DC-4 Crash In Maryland La Guardia Field Accident Takes of 40 By The Associated Press The two worst disasters Sn the na- tion's commercial aviation history killed 03 persons within 24 hours and six other plane accidents around the Japan, Eng- land, Colombia, Iceland, the Neth- erlands and boosted the total number of dead to at least; 174. Three persons were missing and 31 suffered injuries in the nine plane mishaps. The most disastrous of the crashes occurred yesterday Memorial day Port Deposit. Md., when an Eastern Airlines DC-4 transport: cracked Mp, killing all 53 persons passengers and four crew members. Less than 24 hours before the Me- morial day crash in Maryland, 40 persons lost their lives when an- other DC-4, a United Airlines trans- port, crash-Landed .it New York's La Guardia Field. In other plane mishaps the world Thursday: Forty were killed in Japan; 25 in Iceland; 12 in the Netherlands and three were missing: In Alaska. Four persons were killed and an- other seriously injured in three plane crashes in Argentina since Thursday. At Bogota, Colombia, 12 were hurt; Colombian army air force transport plane crash-landed after hitting a buzzard Friday. At Uchfield. England four civil- inns were hurt when Royal Air forca Liberator bomber blew up on an air- port runway Friday. 25 Bodies Found The scries or plane crackups in the last two days Increased to 424 the total number of persons killed in the world sinco January 1 In IS major commercial and military crackups. The bodies of 25 persons were found by searchers in the wreckagft of an Icelandic airways DC-3 which smashed up on a rocky moun- tainside Thursday. There were ten women nnd four children .omonp the passengers, nil Icelanders nnd Norwegians. The crnckup of a C-54 army courier plane southwest of Tokyo cost the lives of 28 enlisted men, eight officers and four civilians. The bodies of all were reported lyurned beyond recognition. Three members of a crew of B-29 which crashed shortly after a. (Continued on Page 2, Column PLANE CRASHES Navv Rcscuo Workers carry a body from the wreckage of the Eastern Airlines plane which carried 53 pereons to their deaths at Port Deposit. Md., last night. Other sheet-covered bodies lie In the fore- ground. CA.P. Wircphoto to The Republican-Herald.) address the Dominion New Italian Cabinet Shaped Without Leftists Rome Premier Designate Alcide de Gasperl finished shaping Two Suffocate in Frazee, Minn., Jail Frazcc, Minn. Sheriff D. A. Wennerstrom of Becker county said last night an inquest into the deaths of two prisoners who suf- focated in the here Friday ule aro tentative. The trip is de- scribed as n good-will visit. Two Killed in Denver Blast Denver Police Captain L, C. Morton reported at least two persons were killed and six or more Injured today in an explosion that The sheriff said bedding used wrecked nil apartment building at by the two men had West Dakota avenue. would be held Monday at 2 p. m. Victims were Arthur" C. Mattson, 40, Minneapolis, and Alvln E, Knut- son. 31. Fertile, Minn., both incm- jers of a nearby railroad construc- tion crew. He will remain until the evening up his fourth straight: cabinet today and for the flrst time in three years Italy will have a government with- socialist or communist; i of June 12, but details of his sched- Minneapolis Boy, Accidentally Shot, in Critical Condition Minneapolis Donald Park- er, four, remained in critical con- dition at General hospital today alter having been accidentally shot with a small caliber rifle by his cousin, Robert Kilberry, seven, while the two were playing "cops and robbers" Thursday. been ignited by a lighted cigarette. Mrs. Ernest Thiclkc whose son was killed while he was In service, got a preview of one of the signs to be placed on a street in Appleton, Minn., named after him. Mayor P. Miller (right) and First Lieutenant Eugene R. Whyte of the 100th National Guard fighter group look on. All streets in the town will be renamed for men who lost their lives in Wjrld War II. (AF. Photo.) "K Firemen and police dug Into the debris to determine whether other occupants were trapped. The two-story brick structure was wrecked, with most of the walls blown out. It was situated in south Denver about one block from Broadway. CupUUri Morton said It was be- lieved gas caused the explosion. The building had 17 apartments. Christian Century Editor Warns of 'Strangling Russia' Madison, Wis. America should "avoid any policy of putting a strangling halter around Russia If. war is to be Dr. Paul Hutchison, editor of the Christian Century magazine, said in outlining a peace plan before the Mad Council of Churches last .night. Minnesota Short Nurses out any members. The new cabinet, which was ap- 1 proved last night by President En-; rico de Nicola, Ls composed solely of Christian Democrats and Indepen- dents. It awaits only the accep- tance of two dcsiguecs to become official. Christian Democrat aides, conced- ing that Do Gaspcri's decision to freeze out the left placed him in a precarious position, maintained that he had no alternative. Combine Inefficient When the Italian leader resigned as premier May 13, they said, he found the Christian Dcmocrat-Com- munist-Sociallst combine so con- stantly at cross purposes that it was unmanageable and inefficient. The government of national unity that he sought proved unattainable, and the small, left-of-center parties had denied him thuir help, except on terms that would have hamstrung him. To this the left, fuming over bc- iiE excluded, reported that De Gus- pcrl had planned things that way; that the lure of American dollars for Italy had led him to maneuver the communists out and that he aimed at virtual dictatorship. In drawing up a ministry con- taining ten or 11 Christian Demo- crats and four or five independent imKazjlie, atuu 111 plan before the Madison ministers, De Gasperl admittedly ran grave political risks. Immediate ones, neutral observers Taul Disclosing that Minnesota Is currently short nearly nurses. Governor Luther YouiiEClahl said he planned to pro- claim a Nursing week in June to focus attention of the situation and recruits for the profession. Youngdahl Proclaims G.A.R. Farewell Day St. raul (ff) Governor Luther Youngdahl has issued a proclama- tion designating "Grand Army of the Republii Farewell day" June 4, when the Minnesota G.A.R. sur- renders its charter organization. to its. national said, were: 1. The 175 Communist-Socialist deputies and the 00 deputies of four smaller leftist parties fell only 13' short of totaling the 278 required to vote the government down in its first test of strength in the 555-man constituent assembly. 2. Even though De Gasperi won In the assembly, the left held a ma- jor threat In the shape of unchal- lenged control of organized labor. 100 Fliers Expected at Waseca Flight Breakfast Waseca, Minn. Cham- ber of Commerce said today it had prepared to feed 100 fliers from a 300-mile radius of Waseca Sunday morning on the occasion of the sec- ond annual breakfast plane flight. Four U. of W. Board of Regents Bills to Be Heard Madison, Wis. Four legis- lative measures relating to the Uni- versity of Wisconsin board of regents will be heard before the senate edu- cation and public welfare commit- tee next Wednesday. Two of the proposals are conflict- ing assembly bills on which the senate will be asked to make a choice. One. sponsored by Republican Floorleadcr Thomson of Klcliland Center, would abolish present gov- erning boards of the state university, teachers' colleges. Stout institute and 1.hc Wisconsin Institute of Technology and combine these in- stitutions under a single board of higher education. Wiley Proposal The other assembly measure, of- fered by G. M, Wiley would create a state council of high- er education to bo composed of members of present governing boards of the state schools. The council, Wiley said, would determine means of coordinating activities of the institutions. Two other bills would increase Ule university board of regents from nine to 12 members and require that appointments to the faculty be made by the university president. Other JVtcasurcs Other measures scheduled for leg- islative hearings next week would: Revise structure of bonuses and promotions to state employes. Repeal the state highway segrega- tion fund. Increase cigarette tax from two to three cents per package, with revenues earmarked for postwar im- provement and construction proj- ects. Guarantee union members demo- cratic procedure at labor meetings, including secret balloting and avail- ability cjf financial reports. U. of M. Psychology Professor Resigns Minneapolis Dr. Theodora Brameld, professor of educational psychology nt University of Min- nesota. Friday announced Ills; res- ignation effective July 23 to accept T. similar post at New York uni- versity. Weather Communists Name New Hungarian Cabinet Leader By Jack Quinn Budapest The Hungarian cabinet announced today that Lajos Dinnyes, 40-year-old minister of war, hud been chosen premier to succeed Fcrncc Nagy, who resigned two days ago while on vacation in Switzerland. The cabinet also announced that Istvan Kcrtesz, recently named min- ister to Rome, had been appointed j to replace Forcijrn Minister and in northwest "and Gyongyosi whose pro-Western views.extreme north portion Sunday, have been opposed by parties. It said that new national elections be held in September. Pressure On President Reports circulated meanwhile, that the communists, having forced Nairy from office, had turned the pressure FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and cloudiness tonight: low 52. Gcneral- fair Sunday and rather cool; lRh 70. Minnesota: Partly cloudy tonight, cooler north and central portions. Considerable cloudiness Sunday with scattered showers south por- tion. Cooler extreme south portion ;unday afternoon. Wisconsin: Partly cloudy tonight Sunday. Coolcr ,1Orthwcst por- _______ on President Zoltan TJldy in con- sun tinuation of what some informants srtid was a determined drive to turn Hungary into a police slate. Appointment of Dinnyes tt> the premiership surprised parliamentary circles. Persons close t.o Olllcia! observations for the hours ending at 12 m. Friday: Maximum, 74; minimum, 51: noon, 7-1. Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, G2; minimum, 38: noon, 62; precipitation, none: sun sets to- tomorrow TEMPERATURES KLSEWHERE Max. Mill. Pet. Chicago Denver cabinet; Mlam, Washington G7 50 8 Escape As Brainerd Farm Home Burns Brainerd, Minn. Mrs. Ev- erct Edwards and her seven chil- dren escaped unhurt last evening when fire destroyed their farm home two and a half miles south of Brainerd. Mrs. Edwards carried the youngest of her children to safety. The fire was discovered as Lake City RIVER IJULUiTIN Flood Stage 2-i-Hr. St.ige Today Change members said that up to this Paul hi IIIR Imrc Oltvanyl, former of the national bonk, hnd been the New yorjt Cii) 50 communist choice for the post: and phOonjz............ 
                            

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