Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: May 28, 1947 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - May 28, 1947, Winona, Minnesota                                w EATHER tonlflit llh fftln nd continued root. N EWS PICTURES Best In Eocal and Daily Full Leased Wire Newi Report of The Associated Press Member of the Audit Bureau of VOLUME 47. NO. 86 WINONA. MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING. MAY 28, 1947 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES VOLUME 47. NU. ____________________ _, V Car Rolls Off Highway, Winonan Killed Budget Asked For Wisconsin Committee Whacks From GoodlancTs Total By Arthur Bvstrom Madison. Ws. The Joint committee- on finance recommended fur pussiigc tn- clny a budget bill for l.'irncst appropriate proposal ;r .hr history, but about S7.000.000 Iras than the amount pro- by the late Governor Walter S G'rfxilnnt! to run the for the two years. rroommi-ndation, prepared lifter week.-, of study of the proposed appropriations submitted by Good- is about above the Mnt'-'s r.-.timatctl Income for the n'-x: two years. If the estimated vjrp'.us July 1, 19-n and the estl- rr.arec: income prove to be correct, there should be a balance :r> treasury at the end of the IWJ bicnntiim. Ineomr Kstlmatrs Budcet Director E. C. Glessel cs- '.he Income at Pay Hikes, Other Benefits Asked for Student Vets The House veterans committee has approv- ed a Mil raising government payments to married student veterans anil banning educa- tional assistance for communist former members of the armed forces. It also recommended late yes- terday passage of a bill to plve free cars to veterans of any war who have lost the USB of a leg or arm, arc paralyzed, blind or nearly blind. If Lin; House and Senate and President Truman po along with the committee, payments lo married student veterans would be raised from to J105 a month, plus S20 for one child and another for each addi- tional one. Thc SG5 sinnlc vet- erans receive would lie un- c banged. Michigan Boy Killer Baffles Parents, Doctor Lapccr. Mich. W) The fantastic story of a 10-year-old farm youth who admitted killing four play- mates "because I wondered what It would feel like to put a bullet through a human being" was sched- uled for court hearing today. Oliver Tcrpcnlng, Jr., a slim, Is charged with {.he murder Monday of 16- year-old Barbara Smith, his farm nlnncc expected stolid youth, Is ly l, 1047 from flower patch mu roxlmatcly year-old Barbar y LI "VIU -DUi Wtfci tin liitui -jv... neighbor at Imlay City, about 20 about half a dozen items.1 miles from here. f.oo.OOO. He revised previous of the b 10 bc or; hand July S'.C to approximately SOO.OOO or about more than he expected to be tn thc treasury whrn his compilations were made csirllrr this year. Goodland, In his budget mcssuRC :o the ipglKlnturo In February, -erorr mended appropriations of about more than thc cost of operating thc state 1.1 1945-47. The committee's bill did not in- o'udc provisions for continuance of of evading authorities, rast-of-llving bonuses and emcrg-l Complete bewilderment over the rncr salary Increases granted civil brutal slaying came yesterday from service employes by the legls- Home Building Permits to Be Lifted June 1 Veterans Priority Among Controls to Be Continued permits will not be required for construction of houses, effective June 1. Housing Expediter Frank R. Crcedon, announcing this today, also said he is lifting then the re- striction on number of bathroom fixtures that may be Installed in new homes; and is expending the area limitation- from square feet to square feet. Crcedon said controls which will bc continued include: Government authorization for nonhouslng construction: veterans preference, which provides a veteran first choice in buying or renting property not intended for the build- ers' own occupancy; rent ceilings on new .construction. Creedon said the permit system is being eliminated to "further simpli- fy thc few remaining restrictions" on homcbuildtng. He said Increased availability of bathroom fixtures makes possible the lifting of the one-bathroom limitation. Concerning the expansion of area limits, which were set up originally because of shortages of building materials, Creedon said: "There has been a marked im- provement in most of thc materials, although there is still a shortage Karl Hex Hammers new imperial potentate ol the Shrine from Pittsburgh, Pa., and former Imperial Potentate George H. Rowe or Buffalo, N. Y.. shake hands during the 73rd annual session at Atlantic City. N. J., of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. Hammers, 62-year-old food executive and a 33rd degree Mason was elected today succeeding Rowe, a New York state supreme court Justice. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) creeclon emphasized that the re- State Police Commissioner Donjmas.ning controls will be continued S. Leonard said the boy also admit- conditions permit further re- tcd killing Stanley Smith, her 14- year-okl brother and his best chum, and her sisters, Gladys, 12, and Janet, two. Captured In Toledo over (.he Ohio state border, the boy wns returned yesterday to Michigan after a night laturr. If these again they add from to OOoTooO lo thr cost of operating the f.nio. Alr.o there has been uppro- by thc present legislature the youth himself, his father, par- ents of tho victims and even the medical examiner who questioned Oliver at East Lansing before the boy was brought, LO thu Lapeer Jail. "I don't know; I Just don't know r.rarly for miscellaneous >cr s'.n'.e needs. fnr Ulcnnlum why I did Leonard quoted Ollv- snylng, and Dr. Lc Moyne state police medico-legal jsnycler, expert who questioned him could These two amounts would only his exclamation, "I wish 000 000 to the to God I knew what was wrong brinelng It to about him." the blcnnlum. As the anticipated in-j is and the surplus1 nbout. total of almost' there would be nboutj henorhc D47cnnim, r.o other appropriations were maclel Ul Exemptions by the late governor were approved; bv '.he committee. Wasliinpton A proposal, to rai.se the personal Income tax ex- Severn! other requests were slash- ;cmption t0 for single persons rt or cut out entirely. A ..-..i ti 500 for married couples was added to the veterans rehabilitation fund was Gcxxl'.arid'r. recommendations out of the bill. appropriation that was proposed 44.07 today by the Senate, bc added to the veterans' postwar] amendment was offered by fund was one of McCIellan (D.-Ark.) to thc cut. pending tax cut bill. Present cx- ___ eruptions arc each for the tnx- Thf university asked his spouse. !v for the blenntum, In-j also voted down 54 eluding fibout for 2o a proposal by Senator Mc- tr.-.-il C'.oodkirul tn recognize family part- tn'-ncicd SH.IM.OOO. iintl thc for rocicnU tax purposes. ,.....f.p went along with this recom-, Stout collects iisked about {Scientists Study Atomic "i-urc The cnmmlttt-e lidded, how- t J.L ot Death tir.d fliinlnntcd sums recommended: IJy nilon C. Fay and miscellaneous! to make up the dlf-1. Washington Scientists are thc possibility of explod- S'.out Institute and tnc .m bomb in thc midst In.'lUutf Technology.ot storm clouds to create a literal rain of death. The advantage of this technique, experts studying the plan told a nDOUl.rc'iiortpr today, is that a city far Inlimrl could be drenched with ra- M'-nomonlf also rrconnnrtuU'd tin: by totiil wuv. about and the in.stltutc fur the blennlurn. Tin- cnmruittec cut. out entirely without the necessity of ri-i-'.riimi'iidi-d nproprlatlcms by tin: u bomb under water, as ULVrrimr fur three functions In the Bikini experiments. of the.-ie S'.'J.i'.L'n annually fur u land i'rnnrimlr inventory. annual- for and fur crnding Swiss cheese. Cuts The Inrccst rut recommended byj rnrnmittrc VlftS.fiOO In old .inns the M-roiid year of :or ,1. The total recommcml- M-hc't durltu: l he blen- Blind persons cierri-ii.'.eti to to counties, how- 26 Morellite Guards Hanged U. S. army executioners hanged 2C more Elite guard administrators of in- famous Mauthausen concentration ramp today, completing thc execu- tion of of the camps' guards and foremen for war crimes. wen- Inerea.-.ed from, TwCIlty.lwo men WL.ro hanged to 'yesterday In two hours and 37 mln- No jirovl.'.ioii'. lire made In the'J J budget for capital In- educational or aids to Any such expeiullture.i have to remain within the Sfi.000.000 cushion IT.UM be levied. or new The budget, does not Include sev- million dollars that the state's hands pass from sources and which arc ear- for ni-grcKatcd funds or go revolving funds. Overell Jury Still Being Selected SanU Ana, Calif. OT) Thc process of selerting a Jury to try Overell ,-md her sweetheart, CVeyrKe Gol'.uin, on charges of mur- her parents was still In the U.ltial stage today. utes. executions of 20 men occupied three hours and 30 minutes. One man received a last-minute .stay of execution. He was Otto SLrlcccl, 32. the Mauthausen mess A final decision Is expected from U, S. army headquarters with- in 24 hours. When Informed of the reprieve, Strlcgel defiantly demanded to know why he was not being hanged with Ills comrades. Weighmaster at La Crosse Dead La Cro.isc, Wal- ker, 72, La Crosse city sealer of weights nnd measures and wclgh- mristiT since 1D24, died at a hospital here last night after a short Illness. Ho underwent an operation recently. laxatlon or unless Congress directs their removal before Nicaraguan Army Leader Promises Free Election By neiflnald L. Wood IVIanairiiii, Nicaraffua Gen- eral Anastaslo Somoxa, head of the army and former president, has promised the Nlcaraguan peor1-" that a new election will be held soon to choose a successor to President Leonardo Arguello, who was forced out of office Monday In a bloodless early mourning coup. Somoza acknowledged his leader- ship of the stroke In on interview last night and blamed the coup d'etat on a plot, to oust him from his post as Jcfe director (director In chief) of the national guard. He said ho had been marked for death. Arguello, who has been given dip- lomatic asylum in the Mexican em- bassy was elected with Somoza'B in balloting February 2 and had held his office only 26 days. He succeeded Somoza, who had been chief of state for ten years. Congress, at a special session Mon- day night, declared Arguello "unfit" for the presidency and named the first presidential alternate, 60-year- old Benjamin Lacayo Sacasa acting president. Cruel by Nature, Prosecutor Declares there were an- other war, "The Japanese would bc just as cruel. It's born in them. They do it to their own people." That is the conclusion of Alva C. Carpenter, who for 17 months has been prosecuting Japanese whose prison camp atrocities horrified thc world. Carpenter said he has tried 1G6 cases involving 380 defendants. Five men have been hanged for their atrocities. There still arc 500 diers, civilian guards and Inter- trial on similar charges. Carpenter said he had set December 31 of this year as a "tar- get date" for completion of all their trials. Fuel Oil, Gasoline Shipments Increasing St. Sixteen per cent more fuel oil and 21 per cent more gasoline was'shipped into Minnesota during last March than in thc same month of 1946. The stale tax department re- ported today that the fuel oil total was gallons compared with a year ago. Thc gasoline total was gallons as against in March of 134G. Tractor fuel receipts dropped from gallons to Mother Better, President Plans Return to Capital Grandview, Mo. President Truman is planning an early return to Washington In view of thc amazing Improvement of his mother in the past few days. Presidential Press Secretary Charles G. Boss said Mrs. Martha E. Truman's improvement has reach- ed such a point that If there is no setback today, "The President may safely consider an early return" to the White House.' Ross made his observation at a news conference a few hours after the President said his mother had the best night" lost night since General Marshall Urges Seaway As Aid to Defense Washington Secretary of State George d Marshall testified today that completion of the St. Lawrence seaway would aid "im- measurably" !n U. S.-Canadian de- fense of the North American con- tinent, Marshall appeared with Former President Herbert Hoover and oth- ers before a Senate foreign rela- tions subcommittee considering new legislation providing for thc au- thorization of thc inter- national development. Marshall said four advantages of the project would: "1. Enable us to build ocean- going war .vessels in the relative security of inland waters; "2, Create a vital new line to thc Industrial heart of the United States and Canada: "3, Create a tremendous source of electric power in an area that does not have enough and would be comparable to that generated by TVA, and in the Columbia and Colorado river systems: "4. Provide this nation, with over-all economic advantages." Herbert Hoover, testifying brief ly. said that were thc seaway now avail- he Hew here May 17. Brigadier General Wallace H. C. F. Schrock Crash Victim Near Lamoille Ben Stansfield, Driver, Slightly Injured Charles F. Sclirock, 74, retired North Western shops painter, was killed about p. m. Tues- day when the car in which he was a passenger rolled off hifih- way Cl near Lamoille. Drivcr of the car was Benja- min P. Stansfield, 57, 1070 Gil- more avenue, who suffered only minor injuries when his 1937 conch rolled over seven or eight times. It is believed that Mr. Schrock, who died of a broken neck, was .killed almost Instantly. A passing I motorist, Raymond Carpcriicr, Pick- stopped at thc scene shor-Jy ;after the accident and he later told Sheriff George Fort that "cr.c man was lying very still." No Inquest County Coroner Dr. Robert B. I Tweedy, who investigated, ruled the accidental and said there was a patch ,would bc no i-orrnnj Inquest. The report of freshly spaded soil today at one-j Thc accldcnt occurred when Mr. l The fuU committee "intensify its ly Lakeview cemetery, where three !Swnsflcld Mld Mr. schrock, who l. ineiuucui _ ,_ _ LTrnvo tm Ulcir Mechanic street, were White House Instigated Red Films, Report Subcommittee Urges Thorough Hollywood Probe subcommittee reported to the House un-American activities committee today that 'Some of the most flagrant Com- munist propaganda films were pro- duced as a result of White House pressure." The report did not say who occu- pied the White House at the time ;he films were produced. The report was based on an in- vestigation recently completed in Hollywood by Chairman J. ParneU Thomas (B.-N. J.) and Representa- tive McDowell The subcommittee reported, also, that "The National labor relations board has given great aid to the Communists in their efforts to in- filtrate and control the motion pic- ture industry." The report did not say who in the White House or labor board was re- sponsible for helping communism in the movie capital, nor did it say when such assistance was given. Thc report recommended that: Gag Imposed As Labor Conferees Near Agreement Washington Senators and House members drafting compromise labor legislation dc- siirned to curb strikes and many union practices headed into the home stretch today. Senator Robert Taft Obio) expressed confidence that a final agreement could be reached by nightfall. Taft, chief of the Senate con- ferees, said the ten voted unanimously to hold no more news conferences until the final version is completed. And each conferee agreed to make no separate statement, Thc Ohioan said the purpose of the rule Is to "avoid con- fusion." Other conferees said privately that iwme members of the committee had protested that' certain of their colleagues were "talking too much" In ad- vance of final decisions. Strikers Protest As Three Dig Mother's Grave investigation of Communist in- fluences In the motion picture in- dustry" with a view to public hear- ings here at the earliest possible date. 2. The committee subpoena com- munist actors, writers, directors and producers and "confront them in public session with the testimony and evidence "against them." In addition, the report proposed an :returning from Milwaukee. Sheriff sons grimly dug a grave for 72-year-old mother. _ And It was thc first new grave off "the there in six weeks, for during nbou., a naif north of time A.P.L. union gravcdiKgcrs have namollle. ncilr George Ruden been on strike. This one, said the I men who spaded It yesterday, wasj He iTaCte indicated that made over the protests of somejthc drjvcr fjm to thc pickets. striking a water break. Then the The task of burying the turaed to lnc ]Pf. o; Ora Estella sjippcd ox the roadway, struct responsibility fluence and Graham, the President's physician, said that thc 94-year-old patient's temperature "is now normal." that her respiration "is _ excellent" arid ner pulse "Is good." Thc amazing progress of the: elderly woman from a severe set- back last Saturday night Is regard- ed by White House aides "as almost miraculous." Had Abandoned Hope Virtually every' one around tem- porary White House headquarters had abandoned hope for her when her condition reached a low point Saturday night. She rallied Sunday, and making steady progress Sunday night. Even a slight chill which led the President to say she had "a bad night" Monday night failed to re- tard her comeback. If the President goes home In'i the next day or two, he plans to cte to be _ fly back out here next week for the U.L1U of government agencies or officials in the production of flagrant com- munist propaganda films." Boy Finds Suicide Note; Saves Self And His Mother Portland, Maine Because David Cross, 12, of Brooklyn, N. Y., found a note In time, he and his mother were alive today. Police Captain Harold K. Magulre said that Mrs. Mabel Cross, .about 40 gave the boy and hcrsnir over- doses of sleeping tablets in a Port- Lowell, Mass.; Blackburn, Moss. j Mr. Slansfleld told the sheriff Thc sons completed thc Job he was by Ule ,i t.hcv reared earlier, nny m-iol nn oncoming car. terferencc from pickets, members Of the A.F.L. Arborists and Land- union. bciiijcia uie .sncrlii saia, MIC mouir pan. The..entire Incident wns termed towiml tnc highway by Mnrtln E. Vnndenverf. union I nd lhe badc cnd was :il representative, "one of those things the Tric mailbox, which had land hotel room, Monday. apparently late reunion of the 35th division with and Colorado whtoh he served in World War One. ana 0010 acn opportunity to keep his long standing date to Address that reunion and check up 'on his mother's condition. able, the United States would be able to move its "full volume" of sur- plus food for the benefit of starv- ing peoples abroad "at a time when we are trying to prevent starva- tlon." "As things now the for- mer president said, "we are able to move to Atlantic coast ports only a maximum of tons of food a month." In answering railroad critics of the seaway, Hoover said he thought "they are unnecessarily alarmed." "I 'he said, "that con- struction of the seaway would have more than a five per cent effect on cast-west railroad traffic." Youngdahl Endorses Minneapolis Tax St. Governor Luther Youngdahl today endorsed the one per cent tax on earned Income which Minneapolis voters will pass upon In thc June 9 municipal election. "I give my full endorsement to the proposed one per cent tax on earned Youngdahl said in a statement. "We cannot evade the, grim reality that additional funds' arc required lo operate the schools of, Minneapolis and that, unless Imms-i diatc steps arc taken to raise thc! necessary money, the doors of our. tried to revive Weather FEDERAL FORECASTS WInona and to- night and Thursday with occasional rain. Continued unseasonably cool. his semiconscious mother and. find- ing the note, ran to the hotel clerk, who called police. Magulre said the note read, In "I have given my son and myself an overdose of sleeping medicine. -I came here because I don't want anyone in. Brooklyn to know about this. have do this, but there is no other way mill, WtJIi Low tonight 42; high Thursday 52. j out. awalled improvement of cloudy north Maguire B.VHUW.U cloudy south with rain or snow ex I Mrs Cross to try to ascertain a Maine General hos- C1OUUY fiUUUJl lmrtHTrr> flip treme north was fair s good. aturcs frost north portion to- schools may be forced to close. Nation-WTde Strike in France Averted last-minute govern- ment-labor compromise averted to- day a 21-hour nation-wide "token" strike of French gas and elec- tric workers seeking wage increases. night. Continued cold Thursday. few scattered snow flurries extreme north portion to- night. Rain remainder of state, be- coming moderate to heavy south portion tonight and ending late Thursday forenoon. Partly cloudy Thursday afternoon. Continued oold with freezing temperatures and scattered frost extreme north por- tion tonight. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 49; minimum, 44; noon, 44; precipitation, .05; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow nl TEMl'KKATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Pet. _4G 25 58 48 .05 .08 .35 .15 .07 Miami Pau New Orleans New York 50 84 5G 85 76 32 74 37 72 (il Ballot Vault Burglarized, Kansas City Board Reports Kansas city board of election commissioners reported today that its vault had been bur- glarized and thc ballot boxes carried away, less than 12 hours after a grand jury had recommended con- tinuation of a probe Into alleged fraud in the 1948 primary election. Ludwlck Graves, chairman of the board, was not Immediately avail- able for a statement, but members of the office stall said the door, of the vault had been forced and the ballot boxes and poll books stolen. The which handles elec- tions and registrations for the city precincts is located on the first of the Jackson county courthouse, across the street from the city hall. Police department officials said they had sent a number of detec- tives to Investigate. RIVER BULLETIN Red Wing 14 Lnko City Reads 12 Dam 4, T.W..... Dam 5, T.W..... Diim 5A, T.W. Winoivi CC.P.) 33 (1, Pool Dam B, T.W..... Dakota (C.P.) Dam 7, Pool Dam 7, T.W..... La Crosse 12 Flood Singe 24-Hr. Stage Today Change 7.3 10.4 (j.8 7.5 5.9 7.0 7.7 7.11 7.3 8.G 3.5 C.G 8.2 Tributary Streams Chippcwa at Durand 5.0 Zumbro at Theilnmn 3.5 Buffalo above Alma 2.5 A county grand Jury report Dodge 1.2 turned last night said that the jury1 believed Roger C. Slaughter was deprived of the Democratic nom- ination for congressman in Mis- souri's fifth district in the primary last August. The extent of the theft was not immediately determined. Members of the election board staff said that no inventory was being made, pend- ing the arrival of Federal Bureau of Investigation offlcers. 4.2 3.9 La Crosse at W. Salem 1.8 Root at Houston Black at Neillsville Black at Galesville .2 .1 .1 .3 .2 _ 2. .3 6.5 RIVER FORECAST (From Hastings to Guttcnbcru) The Mississippi in this district will continue falling but at a more rapid rate since gate operation has begun at several of the locks and dams. Larger tributaries will not change much. Gilkey Farms at Owatonna Sold Owatonna H. S. Gilkey Minneapolis, said last night he had sold the 320-acre farm he acquired near here in 1935 to Leonard Gab- bert, Moorhead. for about The Gilkey farms has been recog- nized as a leading breeder of Hoi- stein cattle, 91 of which were In- cluded in the sale along with all buildings, machineryMeed and seed, Gilkey said, Gabbert will take im- mediate possession of the property. Duluth Man Drowns After Boat Tips Grand Marais, Minn. George Bolach, Duluth, twice- wounded veteran of World War II, was drowned and a companion sav- ed himself by clinging to their boat when a sudden squall overturned it while the pair were fishing on Pine lake, 30 miles north of Hov- lund, late Monday. Jerome A. Coll.ird, 31, said he and Balach were fishing when the flash gale tipped the boat. Both man- aged to regain it and cling to thc sides. After holding to the craft for about an hour, Balach said he was going to swim to shore, Collard re- ported. In his weakened condition, he failed to make the several yard swim, the survivor said. Dionne Quintuplets Mark 13th Birthday Callandcr, Di- onne quintuplets celebrated their 13th birthdays today, and their father said he was wor- ried because they hadn't yet learned to swim. Oliva Dionne added that he was thinking about buildlnp a private swimming pool an his farm for daughters, Annette, Cccilc, Marie, Yvonne and Emi- lie. The girls took a holiday from school to admire their including; watches and neck- laces .burn their parents. bum. 30. feet beyond off the bank, rolled IUVKI- ui eight times and came Wallace M. ElacK- to a stop> whecls upt 90 rcct beyond of Detroit, 42, of and Harold the point where it had lilt thc mall- out, as they feared earlier, nny Position of Car When the car came to a. stop. the sheriff said, the motor part you wish hadn't-happened." Told of a complaint to the ceme- tery by Dr. Blackburn that certain Dlckets had threatened him, Van- lerwerf declared: "I don't know who this could have been. I tried to do the best I can. If anybody did it It wasn't with my sanction. If I had been there and had known about it I'd have had our men go In and dig the grave for thc Blackbums for nothing." Believed May Man of Integrity, Marshall Says -Washinirlon Secretary of tate George Marshall testified to- day that thc army was making "very leavy cutbacks" in ammunition or- ders In year the govcrn- ncnt charges Ex-Congressman An- drew J. May protested a reduction in a shall contract held by thc Garsson munitions combine. Marshall, former army chief of staff, told the jury he knew noth- ing about May's dealings with thc Garssons and that he accepted thc Kentucky Democrat as a "man of Integrity." Several of May's former congressional colleagues also testi- fied that he enjoyed a good reputa- tion while serving in the House. Wisconsin Farm Work Progressing By Thc Associated Press Despite unseasonably cool weath- er and frequent showers, farm work made fairly good progress' In Wis- consin during thc lost week, thc U. S. weather bureau in Milwaukee reported today. Much corn was planted, particu- larly in the southern and west cen- tral sections, but much remains'to be planted, according lo reports reaching the bureau. Some early corn Is up. Oats seeding practically Js com- pleted. Thc bureau reported thnt pros- pects were excellent for a good hay :rop with mcnclows nnd pastures generally in good condition pres- ently. been hit, was carried nJong: parj of the cor were strewn along the tumbling route it took, and a traveling bag. which was In the car, was found about 30 feet away from the car. When Sheriff Fort arrived at thc scene both men were lying on the inside of the roof of the car and towards the rear. Thc position of the two men had changed, trtth Mr. Schrock lying on the driver's side. Thc sheriff said Mr. Schrock was dead when he arrived. Truck Drivcr Helps Carpenter, who was the first to arrive, arranged to call the sheriS. Carpenter said he had difficulty in persuading anyone to stop. Flnaay a truck stopped, and thc driver of- fered to help. Both of the victims were taken to thc WInona General hospital by ambulance. Mr. StansficM had a bruised back. X-rays were taken and he was released. Mr. Schrock. who lived trtth his sister, Mrs. Martha Krings, WInona, was bom Germany August 27 3372, and came to America when he was 11 years old. Surviving arc one daughter. Bcr- nlcc, St. Paul; five sisters. Mrs. Mrs. Olga Beatty and Miss Manoa Elizabeth Aldrlcli, Chicago: Schrock, Los Angeles. Calif Mrs. Martha Krings and and Mrs. Gussie Morse. Winona, and two brothers. Max, Missoula, Mont., and Paul, Saginaw, Mich. Mr. Schrock's wife died about four years ago. Funeral services will bc Satur- day at 2 p. m. at thc Breitlow fu- neral home. Burial will bc Woodlawn cemetery. Friends may call nt the funeral home Friday from 7 to 9 p. m. Tn line wtli thc general sus- pension of business on Memorial Day, Thc Republican-Herald Kill omit publication on Friday this week. ir Advertisers desiring space in the issue of Saturday, May 3J, arc requested to have their copy in thc hands oj thc advertising department on Thursday, before noon if possible. Lion Attacks Trainer During Circus Show Dccatur. Ernest Er.ger. 57-year-old animal trainer of Springfield Gardens, N1. Y.. received several severe bites on the hips arid legs last night when attacked by a lion during a performance of the Hippodrome Thrill circus. EnKcr, who lost an ,inn when at- tacked by a lion .several years ago. received emergency treatment at .1 hospital nnd returned to the circus to take his bow. Thc trainer was attacked imme- diately after entering the cage. Cir- cus attendants, iirnu-d with heavy i poles, beat the lion off while others entered the cage and carried Engcr out. Monsanto to Quit Atom Bomb Plant Operation Washington The Monsanto Chemical Company, which has op- erated thc atomic energy project at Oak Ridge, Tcnn., for the last two years, will terminate its contract with the atomic energy commis- sion. A joint statement by the com- mission and the company today dis- closed that a difference between the two over the company's pro- posal to transfer some research to company laboratories at St. Louis. Dayton and Springfield. Ohio, was the major reason for the decision not to renew thc contract expiring next June 30.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication